From a Donga Ilbo editorial

“Some talk about the rise of “alpha girls” but those alpha girls are held back by these discriminative policies at work. They seem to still have a long way to struggle.”

“Ms. Lee, who works at a public agency under a municipal government, filed a complaint to the National Human Rights Commission after being refused of application for family allowance to support her mother. Her workplace had a policy of granting allowance to first sons who do not live parents but only to first daughters in the same situation who had no siblings. Ms. Lee was supporting her family and a younger brother in school. The commission saw the case as “violation of equal rights” and advised the agency to revise the policy. They saw it as a clear discrimination against women based on conventional perception of sex, which puts all burden of supporting immediate ascendants to men’s shoulders.”

Regarding this, Ms Lee’s employer stated that most Korea government agencies favour Korean men.

Donga Ilbo 6 July 2016

Posted by Errol, filed under Culture, finger chopping wacky, K-girls, Law, Politics. Date: July 6, 2016, 12:49 am | No Comments »

Culture critic Lee said hwabyeong has its roots in the feudal Korean kingdom that lasted from 1392 to 1897, as its strict class hierarchy and patriarchy offered no social mobility.

“For those who belonged to the lower caste, there really was no way for them to fight injustice if they were abused by those who belonged to the higher class,” he said. “The only way was to just endure it. And we also have to remind ourselves that the slavery system from the Joseon kingdom did not completely disappear in Korea until the 1940s.”

Koreans becoming more prone to rage, Korea Times, 30 March 2016

A U.S. citizen, who was  then 17 years old, said she was raped by a Korean man in Seoul in 2014 when she was on an exchange program at a high school. Unlike Mattner, she decided to stay silent and not tell anyone of her “shameful” experience.

“He was Korean and I am (a) foreigner, so I was scared that I might not win the case. I didn’t want to go through the pain of facing the Korean court system and exposing my rape to my friends and family, for the chance that he might go to jail,” she told The Korea Herald. “I learned that the hard way, but Korea needs to develop better resources when dealing with rape.”

Kim Bo-hwa, a senior researcher from the Korea Sexual Violence Relief Center, said that the ordeal is equally felt among Korean victims due to lack of awareness of sexual crimes here.

“Rape victims here suffer from insensitivity toward them among government officials, lawyers, their families,” she told The Korea Herald.

Korea’s justice system fails foreign victims of rape, Korea Times, 30 March 2016

One of the victims listed in the Korea Times article has a gofundme page.

https://www.gofundme.com/justiceforairdre

 

 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, Law. Date: March 31, 2016, 4:17 am | No Comments »

7:13 p.m.: Cho was sexually molested by a family friend from age five to 12. “I had a very long-term relationship with this abuser, which is a horrible thing to say. I didn’t even understand it was abuse, because I was too young to know,” she says. “I endured it so many times, especially because I was alone a lot.” At 14, she was raped by another acquaintance. “I was raped continuously through my teenage years, and I didn’t know how to stop it. It was also an era where young girls were being sexualized. For me, I think I had been sexually abused so much in my life that it was hard for me to let go of anger, forgive or understand what happened.”

7:14 p.m.: She looks over at Moraga, who is texting on his cell phone. “I guess we can play that song now,” she says to him. “I hope I can remember the lyrics.”

7:15 p.m.: The song, entitled “I Want to Kill My Rapist,” is from her new album. Cho starts singing: “I want to kill my rapist, I want to kill my rapist,” repeatedly to me while Andy strums an acoustic guitar. The rest of the lyrics elaborate on this theme and are occasionally funny, but it comes from a real and dark place. She continues, “I thought I forgave you, but I’d mistake you. I’ll shake you and I’ll bake you. You better run now while I’m having fun now. Here comes the sun now, and you’ll be done now. I see clearly and sincerely, you’ll pay dearly…”

7:22 p.m.: Cho admits that her abuser is still alive and her family knows about it. She says that sexual molestation is an excusable offense in her traditional Korean family’s eyes, which she thinks is insane. Her family believes that people shouldn’t make a fuss about things that have happened to them in the past. “They don’t really want to talk about it, because that would make it real somehow. I think Asian culture often is in denial about such things. Like, if they don’t talk about it, it doesn’t exist. So it makes me unwelcome in some ways,” she says. “But all I have is ownership of my own suffering. I can take that and explain it in a way that helps resolve it. But I often think, ‘How do I have sanity? How do I bring justice?’ I kind of save myself through it. ”

 

Danielle Bacher , Billboard, 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, K-girls. Date: September 7, 2015, 2:45 am | No Comments »

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Jay expected fried chicken – what he got was an avalanche of lawyers’ letters.

Then in the midst of all this, a less-than-enthusiastic review of Jinjuu by Fay Maschler, veteran critic for the London Evening Standard, is removed from the paper’s website. As a restaurant critic of some years’ standing, I can say that’s unusual. I am told that Joo wrote a letter of complaint about the review, which was forwarded to the Evening Standard. Will Gore, deputy managing editor of the Evening Standard, said the review had been taken down while Joo’s complaint was investigated. “I’ve now gone back to her to try and find a final resolution to the debate,” Gore said.

As I understand it, the letter is basically a long complaint that Maschler doesn’t appear to understand Korean food; that, for example, Korean fried chicken is meant to have a hard batter coating like hers does. Perhaps. It seems to me that this merely proves “authentic” really is not the same as “good”.

Jay Rayner, Observer Magazine, Sunday 26 April 2015

 

Posted by Errol, filed under Culture, finger chopping wacky, Funny, K-girls, Law. Date: May 3, 2015, 5:12 am | 1 Comment »

貨物船に浸水、14人救助 能登半島沖の日本海

Helicopter Rescue (Sankei photo)

A relatively restrained Japanese commentator observes:

Actually, there is nothing exceptional about this incident. It was rather routine really. A Cambodian freight ship sprang a leak and called for assistance. Some soldiers stationed on a isolated island outpost got the distress code and relayed the message to neighboring countries where upon a naval helicopter was dispatched and saved all the crew members transporting them to safety. In all fairness, this was standard operating procedure.
So why the headlines? Firstly, the military outpost that got the SOS was the disputed Takeshima Islands/Liancourt Rocks and the soldiers stationed there were Korean military. Secondly, the naval helicopter that rushed to the rescue was of the Japanese Maritime Defense Force. Adding insult to injury, the winter winds that blow from west to east would have meant that it would have been easier for a Korean helicopter to reach the sinking ship than a Japanese helicopter flying against the 20m/sec wind.
Nice to know all the crew members survived. Bad day for Koreans though. Japanese reactionaries are not going easy on an opportunity to laugh their heads off.

Regardless of the funny side of the the incident, any helicopter pilot would tell you that it is sometimes better to fly upwind while empty (and therefore downwind with the rescued passengers) than the opposite.

Posted by Dokdodevil, filed under diplomacy. Date: March 15, 2015, 11:21 pm | No Comments »

South Korea’s Constitutional Court threw out a decades-old anti-adultery law on Thursday, reflecting a growing importance of personal choice over marital order in a traditionally group-oriented society.

In a 7-2 decision, the nine-member bench ruled that Article 241 of the criminal code was unconstitutional.

“The anti-cheating law has been traditionally aimed at punishing women, but those days are long gone now,” Song Jae-ryong, a sociology professor at Kyung Hee University, said.

Others said the law was practically non-existent, as it had lost its effectiveness in preventing infidelity.

“The anti-adultery law is no longer achieving its purpose,” Kim Jeong-beom, a law professor at Hangyang University, said. “Penalties have become extremely light and don’t have the preventative effect they’re supposed to have.”

Kim Min-soo, an office worker, said. “It’s not like the ruling would make people feel freer to cheat than before.”

Love cheats are already rampant and adultery is institutionalised in a country where people don’t marry for romantic love but for jeong.

Park Sojung, Yonhap News, 26 February 2015

 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, Economics, K-girls, Law. Date: February 26, 2015, 4:38 pm | No Comments »

You know that you are getting old when ….

The Korean girl stays beside you in the street.

You know the feeling – you are walking along the lonely beach with your young friend, there is nobody in sight and she is beside you, about a foot away, about an inch away, about minus one inch away, she’s holding your hand, she’s … Shortly you are off the dry sand onto the wet sand, now your shoes are getting wet. So you guide her back to a parallel course and the process repeats and repeats again. Repeats, that is, until anyone comes into view. That distant figure might be a Korean man who could rebuke her for degrading herself with a foreigner. In an instant she is back in her place two metres behind. The same walking a girl home at night: she stays so close that you feel about to fall off the kerb, but if anyone appears then back two metres. She does not want to be seen as the mistress of a blue-eyed monster.

Well the other day I was taking a friendly young Korean university student to her first day at a language school in the city. Walking down George Street I felt that something was out of place. There she was: giggling and smiling beside me, not in the standard Korean girl’s public following position. The thought that other Koreans might take her for my mistress had not occurred to her.

Perhaps I am now old enough to be safe.

Posted by Dokdodevil, filed under K-girls, Rants. Date: February 25, 2015, 3:46 am | 1 Comment »

 

Kim’s label Oscar Entertainment released a statement on Friday saying that the singer was irritated before boarding a Korean Air flight.

“Kim drank some wine on the flight after he got distressed by Korean Air,” the agency said. According to Kim’s agency, Kim thinks he is always entitled to upgrade his economy class seat to a business class seat as he is a male Korean celebrity but Korean Air failed to do so by mistake.

“He does not exactly remember what mistakes he made,” it added.

The mistakes Bobby Kim made were forcibly cuddling a flight attendant, touching her arms and then loudly and aggressively verbally abusing her for about an hour.

Ock Hyun-ju, 9 January 2015, The Korea Herald

Stories of entitled minor Korean celebrities taking out their frustrations on hapless flight attendants are now less likely to be hushed up after the Nut Rage Incident of 2014. The soju defence is a common theme of these incidents. Is this the beginning of the end of the Modern Era of Yangban?

Even though Korean Air flight attendants are hosts and hostesses, an aircraft cabin is not a host or hostess bar for inebriated ajumma and ajeossi.

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, finger chopping wacky, Law, Scams, Science. Date: January 10, 2015, 4:00 am | No Comments »

In 2014, at least 30 000 of the 240 000 Korean teenagers working in Korea stated that they were not paid at all, according to a report released by the Korean Gender Equality Ministry.

25 000 stated that they were sexually or verbally harassed.

190 000 Korean teenagers stated that they worked without written contracts.

37 000 stated that they were not paid for extra work.

Currently, the minimum wage in Korea is 5,580 won (USD 5.06) an hour.

Claire Lee, Korea Herald, 7 January 2015

Posted by Errol, filed under Culture, Economics, Scams. Date: January 7, 2015, 6:32 am | No Comments »

 

An aide to Kim Kwang-jin, one of 10 lawmakers who sponsored a bill asking for more than $1.2 million and an official apology from the Korean government for 122 former prostitutes, said police and health centers told the women they were conducting “patriotic acts” with U.S. troops.

The former sex workers who have sued the South Korean government, claimed it encouraged them to become prostitutes after the Korean War. They will have their first court hearing on 18 December 2014.

The 122 elderly women are asking for more than $1.2 million, an official apology from the government and an investigation into the South Korean Government’s overseering of their work.

“This bill is to let people know that the women are victims and the state needs to take responsibility for them,” he said.

Lee Na-young, a sociology professor at Chung-Ang University in Seoul, said Seoul is unlikely to concede that it encouraged prostitution. “South Korea achieved its national security by using women’s bodies and sex,” she said.

Ashley Rowland and Yoo Kyong Chang
Stars and Stripes
Published: December 18, 2014

Park Chung-hee considered such women to be born to a fate of prostitution. It is their fate and the fate of their daughters, and their daughters’ daughters. This Korean caste system continues in modern Korea and is used as an excuse for Korean males and females who are not members of the Korean prostitution caste to justify their ill treatment of the prostitution caste and family members of the prostitution caste. Travelling first class enables these privileged males and females of Korea to behave very badly and engage in nut rage against anybody whom they regard to be a member of an inferior caste.

Posted by Errol, filed under Anti-Americanism, Culture, Economics. Date: December 19, 2014, 2:54 pm | No Comments »

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