South Korea’s Constitutional Court threw out a decades-old anti-adultery law on Thursday, reflecting a growing importance of personal choice over marital order in a traditionally group-oriented society.

In a 7-2 decision, the nine-member bench ruled that Article 241 of the criminal code was unconstitutional.

“The anti-cheating law has been traditionally aimed at punishing women, but those days are long gone now,” Song Jae-ryong, a sociology professor at Kyung Hee University, said.

Others said the law was practically non-existent, as it had lost its effectiveness in preventing infidelity.

“The anti-adultery law is no longer achieving its purpose,” Kim Jeong-beom, a law professor at Hangyang University, said. “Penalties have become extremely light and don’t have the preventative effect they’re supposed to have.”

Kim Min-soo, an office worker, said. “It’s not like the ruling would make people feel freer to cheat than before.”

Love cheats are already rampant and adultery is institutionalised in a country where people don’t marry for romantic love but for jeong.

Park Sojung, Yonhap News, 26 February 2015

 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, Economics, K-girls, Law. Date: February 26, 2015, 4:38 pm | No Comments »

You know that you are getting old when ….

The Korean girl stays beside you in the street.

You know the feeling – you are walking along the lonely beach with your young friend, there is nobody in sight and she is beside you, about a foot away, about an inch away, about minus one inch away, she’s holding your hand, she’s … Shortly you are off the dry sand onto the wet sand, now your shoes are getting wet. So you guide her back to a parallel course and the process repeats and repeats again. Repeats, that is, until anyone comes into view. That distant figure might be a Korean man who could rebuke her for degrading herself with a foreigner. In an instant she is back in her place two metres behind. The same walking a girl home at night: she stays so close that you feel about to fall off the kerb, but if anyone appears then back two metres. She does not want to be seen as the mistress of a blue-eyed monster.

Well the other day I was taking a friendly young Korean university student to her first day at a language school in the city. Walking down George Street I felt that something was out of place. There she was: giggling and smiling beside me, not in the standard Korean girl’s public following position. The thought that other Koreans might take her for my mistress had not occurred to her.

Perhaps I am now old enough to be safe.

Posted by Dokdodevil, filed under K-girls, Rants. Date: February 25, 2015, 3:46 am | 1 Comment »