A bogus pornographer has been busted in Gwangju, according to the Choson Ilbo.

A 33-year-old man was booked on Thursday for luring a woman into sex by posing as a pornographer. According to a police station in Gwangju, the man identified as Kim approached a woman in her late 20s on Sep. 20 through online chat and introduced himself as a director of adult movies who was looking for actresses for a film. Kim told her the performers would be masked so she could rest assured that her identity would not be revealed.

Kim showed her a porno film he had downloaded on his portable player, saying the video was his own work, according to police. After promising to pay her W6 million (US$1=W945) for half a day’s filming, Kim asked her to take part in “rehearsals” and had sex with her twice, on Sept. 24 and 25.

But when the day of the supposed shoot arrived, Kim cut short a phone call from the aspiring starlet saying he was busy and answered neither her calls nor her text messages afterwards.

Just in case you think this method does not work, I met a guy in Japan doing just that. He would meet girls on the street, offer large amounts of money to star in a porn movie, then make himself scarce after he got what he wanted. He was an American guy, by the way, and managed to convince the girls in English.

Posted by Matt, filed under Funny. Date: September 28, 2006, 10:59 pm | 5 Comments »

Tsushima
A map of Tsushima

Japan Probe has linked a Japan Times article in which the city of Tsushima has rejected the Korean municipality of Masan’s claim of sovereignty over Tsushima.

NAGASAKI (Kyodo) The city assembly of Tsushima, Nagasaki Prefecture, adopted a unanimous resolution Thursday demanding the South Korean city of Masan repeal its ordinance that claims Japan’s Tsushima Islands as South Korean territory.

In March 2005, the municipal assembly of Masan in South Gyeongsang Province designated June 19 as “Daemado Day,” commemorating the dispatch of Korean forces to Tsushima on that day in 1419. The Japanese islands lying between the two countries are known as Daemado in Korean.

Although Tsushima has stayed silent over the matter, some assembly members have begun voicing their concerns amid strained bilateral ties between Japan and South Korea in part over former Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi’s visits to the war-linked Yasukuni Shrine, assembly members said.

The article continues -

Some Tsushima assembly members have been cautious about their resolution, however, hoping it will not further complicate bilateral strains, they said.

The Masan ordinance says it is designed to have people at home and abroad recognize that Tsushima is South Korean territory with common historic and cultural backgrounds and hence a territorial right, but the Japanese city sees no historical grounds in the claim, city officials said.

The Tsushima resolution says the claim in the Masan ordinance is groundless and an imprudent view.

One city official expressed concern that the assembly’s move may have a negative impact on tourism to the islands.

I think that city official is foolish. It is important for Korean tourists to know that Tsushima is not rightfully a part of Korea. If they wrongly believe it is part of Korea controlled by Japan, then that false belief will eventually damage relations between Korea and Japan.

Posted by Matt, filed under diplomacy. Date: September 28, 2006, 7:24 pm | 49 Comments »

A CNN online poll asked the following question:

Now that Shinzo Abe has become Japan’s prime minister, do you think it is appropriate for him to visit the Yasukuni Shrine?

or View Results

According to a KBS News article today, 99% of more than 198,000 people answered “yes.” The article also said that Koreans think the Japanese manipulated the results, and that some Koreans said that even though they voted “no,” their vote did not show up on the results. It also said that an earlier CNN poll asked the following question:

Do you think Japan needs to compensate victims of World War II?

According to the KBS article, 99% of those surveyed said, “It isn’t necessary.”

Now that Korean “netizens” know about the poll, let’ see how long that 99% figure stands.

Here is the link to the CNN page:

“Japan Decides: Abe ushers in new era”

Posted by Gerry-Bevers, filed under diplomacy. Date: September 28, 2006, 1:08 am | 38 Comments »

On its Web page here, The Korea Society describes its organization as follows:

The Korea Society is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan, 501(c)(3) organization with individual and corporate members that is dedicated solely to the promotion of greater awareness, understanding and cooperation between the people of the United States and Korea….

That description may be the goals of the The Korea Society, but that does not mean that those goals are always achieved or are even desired in certain situations. For example, I wonder if The Korea Society is really interested in promoting “greater awareness” when it comes to “Dokdo” (Liancourt Rocks). I am curious because I notice on its Web site here that one of the recipients of its 2005 scholarship was a man named Steve Barber from Scottsdale, Arizona.

If the Steve Barber who received The Korea Society scholarship is the same Steve Barber who wrote this letter and who has been posting as Wedgie, and possibly other names, on this blog and others, then I fear that the goals of the society are not being achieved when it comes to the issue of “Dokdo.”

I believe that Steve Barber’s goal is leaning more toward promoting Korean propaganda on “Dokdo” than toward promoting “greater awareness.” I do not know if he is is working alone or if he has the support of The Korea Society, but if he is “Wedgie,” then I think he was a poor choice for the organization’s 2005 scholarship.

And what is really disturbing is that it looks like Steve Barber (Wedgie) may be a high school teacher:

“Can we talk the talk?”

Posted by Gerry-Bevers, filed under diplomacy, Scams. Date: September 25, 2006, 9:03 am | 67 Comments »

I do not know if the following blogger is serious or not, so please consider this post comic relief:

North Korea: the most successful nation on Earth?

Pros:  Let’s see, there’s no black peeplez, no jews, no Westeners, no mexicans or other latrinos, no South or Southeast Asians, no feminists, no fags, no immigration, no American military base, and no bowing down to foreign interests.  Sounds good to me. 

Cons: bad economy, food crises that have resulted in starvation. 

The economy is only one aspect of a country.  And although many North Koreans have indeed starved from food crises, the population’s growing anyway.  The fertility rate for North Korea is nearly TWICE as high as that for the South (2.1 vs. 1.27).  South Korea is also facing a glut of racial half-breeds and interethnic marriages with people from Vietnam and other similar countries.  They’ll eventually go down the toilet unless they change course. 

North Korea: the last real nation on Earth.  $2,000 per-capita GDP and all.

Kyungjunyo

I would like to tell the guy to “go to hell,” but it seems like he is ready to jump on a plane and go there, anyway.

Posted by Gerry-Bevers, filed under Racist Industrial Complex. Date: September 25, 2006, 6:45 am | 10 Comments »

Sea Lions & More Proof Usando was not “Dokdo”

In Part 4 of my series of posts entitled “Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video,” I talked about a reference in an old Korean document to an island called “Gajido” (可支島 = 가지도), which means “Seal Island.” The “gaji” (可支) means “seal,” and the “do” (島) means “island.” I mentioned that Koreans claim that Gajido was a reference to “Dokdo” based solely on the fact that sea lions used to live there. I pointed out, however, that sea lions also used to live on Ulleungdo and that the document mentioning “Gajido” described it as a place on or near Ulleungdo. You can read my post here.

Here are two different references to the “sea lions” on Ulleungdo from two separate Korean historical documents, which I have already mentioned in previous posts:

1786 Inspection of Ulleungdo

“We advanced to Gaji Beach (可支仇味) and found two caves in the side of the mountain. It was too difficult to calculate their depth. We surprised some sea lions that dashed out (of a cave). All our riflemen fired at once and got two of them before they could get into the water.”

1794 Inspection of Ulleungdo

We slept there (Southeast Jeojeondong), and on the 26th, we changed direction (reversed course) and went to Gajido (可支島), where we surprised four or five sea lions that dashed out. They looked like water buffalo. Our riflemen all fired at once and got two of them. The geographical features of the beach landing (丘尾津) was the strangest thing. We went about ten ri into the valley, where we found the remains of what were clearly ancient dwellings. On both sides, the hills and ravines were so high and deep that they were difficult to climb up.

The 1786 document referred to sea lions, two caves, and a beach called “Gaji-gumi” (可支仇味), which means “Seal Beach.” In my post, I suggested that “Seal Beach” was on the west side of Ulleungdo because on an 1882 Korean map of Ulleungdo, there was a cave on the west side of the island called Gaji-gul (可支窟), which means “Seal Cave.”

The 1794 document also talked about sea lions on Ulleungdo. It said the inspection party surprised four or five sea lions that looked like “water buffalo” (水牛) and killed two of them. Then the record seemed to go on to talk about a beach and a valley near where the sea lions were killed. The record said that the inspection party walked four kilometers into the valley, which means it could not have been “Dokdo” since the whole island of Dokdo is not even four kilometers long.

In my post I said that it was ridiculous for Koreans to claim that Gajido was “Dokdo” based on the above two records, and I said there were no other references to Gajido in Korean historical documents. Well, I was right about there not being other references to Gajido, but tonight I did find another reference to Ulleungdo sea lions in an 1899 article from a Korean newspaper entitled “Hwang Seong Newspaper (皇城新聞). Here is the relevant portion of the article:

The article is describing Ulleungdo after an inspection team had recently returned from the island. It said that Ulleungdo had six, small neighboring islands, and that Usando and Jukdo were “the most prominent” (最著者). Skipping over whether Usando was a reference to Gwaneumdo or Dokdo, I want to focus on the portion outlined in red, which translates as follows:

“In the past, “water animals” (水獸) that looked like “cows without horns” (牛形無角) lived there and were called “gaji” (可之).”

The “gaji” (可之) in the above quote was obviously referring to “gaji-eo” (可支魚), which meant “sea lion.” Notice that the sentence said that sea lions “used to live” on Ulleungdo, which meant that they no longer lived there. Therefore, that means that the Usando referred to in the article as a neighboring island of Ulleungdo was NOT “Dokdo” (Liancourt Rocks) since there were still sea lions on Liancourt Rocks at that time.

I know it may seem like just a little thing, but I felt I needed to add it to part four of my series to be complete. By the way, to the people on this blog who helped me with the character 獸(수), “thanks.”

Also, you might have noticed that the article mentioned that Ulleungdo had three large peaks, which again suggests that references to Sambongdo (三峯島) in old Korean documents were references to Ulleungdo, not “Dokdo.” Sambongdo means “Island of Three Peaks.

Japanese Translation Provided by Kaneganese

(Gerryの投稿の日本語訳です。)

アシカと“独島”が于山島では無いさらなる証拠

“数々の嘘と半分の真実、それに独島ビデオ”と銘打った私の投稿のシリーズパート4では、アシカ島という意味の可支島(ガジド 가지도) が韓国の古い文献にどう記述されているか、お話しました。”可支”(ガジ)と は韓国語で“アシカ(オットセイ、アザラシ)”の意味です。韓国人が可支島は“独島 (Liancourt Rocks)”の古称であると主張する根拠は、アシカが以前そこに生息していた、と言う事実のみであることは既に述べました。しかし私が指摘した通り、アシカは鬱陵島にも生息しており、しかも鬱陵島視察報告では、可支島は鬱陵島上、ないしはすぐ近くのある場所、として記述されているのです。ここで私の投稿を読むことが出来ます〈リンク〉。

既に投稿済みですが、鬱陵島の“アシカ”についての二つの異なる記述が、それぞれ別の韓国の歴史文献に見られます。

1786年の鬱陵島の検察
“我々はアシカ入江(可支仇味)へと向かい、そこに2つの洞穴が山の側にあるのを確認した。深さを測るのは大変難しかった。我々に驚いたアシカが数頭(洞穴から)飛出てきた。射撃手が皆同時に撃ち、海へ逃げ込む前に2頭をしとめた。”

1794年の鬱陵島の検察
“そこで宿泊してから、26日に向きを変え可支島(ガジド)へ向かった。 そこで、4,5頭のアシカが飛出てきて大変驚いた。まるで水牛のようだった。射撃手が一斉に撃ち、うち2頭をしとめた。入江の船着場(丘尾津)の地理的な形は、最も変わっていた。10里ほど谷に入ると、そこには昔の住居跡がそのまま残っていた。左右に谷山があり、それらは幽玄で深く、歩いて登るのは難しい。”

1786年の報告では、アシカ数頭、2つの洞穴、そして“アシカ入江”を意味する“可支仇味”について記述があります。私は投稿の中で、この“可支仇味”が鬱陵島の西側にあったと推測しました。というのも、1882年の韓国の鬱陵島の地図では、可支窟という、“アシカ洞穴”を意味する洞穴が島の西側に描かれているからです。

1794年の文献でも鬱陵島のアシカについての記述があります。それには、検察団に驚いた”水牛”のようなアシカが4,5頭飛び出してきてうち2頭を射殺した、と記述しています。記録では、アシカを射殺した場所の周囲の海岸や谷のことについて筆を進めています。それによると、彼等はそれから谷を4km徒歩で分け入ったことになっていますが、そのことは奇しくも、この場所が“独島”では有りえない事を意味しています。“独島”の全長は4kmも無いのですから。

私は、韓国人が上掲の2つの記録をもとに可支島は鬱陵島だと主張するのは馬鹿げていると言い、また韓国の他の歴史文献で可支島について記述してあるものは無い、とも言いました。実は、可支島についてではないのですが、鬱陵島のアシカについての記述がある、1899年の韓国語新聞“皇城新聞”の記事を今晩見つけました。以下に関連する部分を載せます。

図1:皇城新聞記事(1899)

この記事は検察団が戻った後の鬱陵島の様子を記述しています。それによると、鬱陵島には6つの小さな島が隣接しており、于山島と竹島(Jukdo)(もしくは于山島竹島)が最も代表的な島です。于山島が観音島と独島のどちらを指しているのか、と言う問題はさておき、記事に赤で丸をした部分に注目して訳してみました。

“過去に、角の無い牛のような“水獣”が生息しており、可之と呼ばれていた。”

引用した記事の“可之”は、明らかに“アシカ”を意味する“可支魚”のことを指しています。この文中でアシカが鬱陵島に“過去に生息していた”と書かれていることに注目して下さい。つまり、記事が書かれた時点ではもう生息していないことを意味しています。ということはつまり、この記事に鬱陵島に隣接する島として書かれた于山島は、絶対に“独島”(Liancourt Rocks)ではありません。なぜなら、その当時Liancourt Rocksにはアシカがまだ生息していたからです。

こういったことは大したこと無いように見えるかもしれません。しかし、“数々の嘘と半分の真実、それに独島ビデオ”という私の一連の投稿を締めくくるに当たって、このことをパート4に付け加える必要がある、と感じたのです。ところで、このブログ上で獸(수)と言う字を解読するのに助言を下さった方々に感謝します。

また、この記事には鬱陵島には三つ峰があると書いてあります。これはまたしても韓国の古い文献において、三峯島と呼ばれている島が“独島”では無いことを示しています。

Links to More Posts on Takeshima/Dokdo (With Japanese translations)

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 12

Posted by Gerry-Bevers, filed under Verus Historia. Date: September 24, 2006, 10:54 am | 20 Comments »

I was debating some Asian Americans over at a site called ‘Yellow World’, a site that seems to be mostly dominated by Korean Americans, as far as I can see, with Chinese Americans coming second. As usual, I was polite but firm in the debate. I was doing quite well, presenting evidence and making convincing arguments. However, a moment ago I tried to log in and got this message.

Yellow World

The funny thing is that I was the only person there that was behaving with good forum manners. All the others there were attacking me in a personal sense, and seemed to have an unhealthy interest in the idea that I might be having sex with ‘their’ women.

I am not going to go into this too much or waste too much words on these people but I will say this. The posters and the moderators there are childish, unintellectual and cannot handle themselves in a real debate. When they are losing the debate they give in to a totalitarian impulse to try to punish the messenger by banning him. Yellow World is representative of the sorry state of Asian American forums. Jodi from The Asia Pages had a run in with another Asian American forum that bans people that are able to beat them in debate.

Anyway, enough of wasting words on them. Go and check it out for yourself. I was posting there under my pseudonym, ‘shakuhachi’.

Posted by Matt, filed under Racist Industrial Complex. Date: September 24, 2006, 4:14 am | 62 Comments »

Last night I came across an anti-Japanese, Korean-language Web site while doing a search on another topic. Translated into English, the name of the site is as followings:

“Enjoy Japan: Anti-Japanese Database”

The address for the site is as followings:

http://cafe.naver.com/killzap.cafe

I assume that “Killzap” was used in the address either because the “Kill Jap” name was already taken or because Naver has some kind of policy against using such names. Anyway, the main purpose of this post is not to talk about anti-Japanese Web sites in Korea, but to talk about one particular post I found on the site.

The “Killzap.cafe” blog is a members-only site, so non-members do not normally have access to the posts, but it appears I got access to one of them because it came up on a Naver search. Anyway, the post attracted my attention because it mentioned my name and some of our activities here at Occidentalism.org.

Apparently, one member of the site got a letter from a person named Steve Barber who supposedly lives in Yongin, here in Korea, with his Korean wife. In his letter, Mr. Barber expressed concern that Japanese were working with foreigners, particularly with “idiots like Gerry Bevers,” to promote Japanese claims on “Takeshima.”

Mr. Barber felt that Koreans needed to do more to promote their claims in English and suggested that they use Mark Lovmo’s site to do it. Mr. Barber even offerred to help translate the material.

According to the Korean-language explanation, Mr. Barber contacted the Korean gentleman after seeing him post about “Dokdo” on my “Korean Language Notes” blog. Apparently, Mr. Barber was impressed.

Based on the contents of the letter, including Mr. Barber’s asking about a possible shorter distance for “ri,” I think I know some of the aliases that Mr. Barber posts under, and others here probably know them, too.

Anyway, it is nice to know that our posts on Dokdo/Takeshima are being read and discussed among Korean “Dokdo” advocates and their sympathizers. By the way, I am not worried about anything that Mr. Barber might post on Mark Lovmo’s site because he is fighting against the truth, which means he cannot win such a fight.

I realize that describing the Dokdo/Takeshima debate as “a fight” may seem silly to some people, but it is a “fight for the truth.”

The following is a copy of the post from the site, which includes Mr. Barber’s August 31, 2006 letter to Mr. Cho:

주고 받은 메일을 공개한다는게 어떨지 좀 그렇지만….

생각해 볼 여지가 있는 내용이라, 올려 놓습니다.

사실 독도문제는 그냥 우리끼리 “독도는 우리땅”….

이것보다는 뭔가 다른 접근방법이 필요하다는 생각입니다.

이 사람이 아래 메일에서 지적한 것과 같이…

혹시 우리가 과거의 역사를 되풀이하고 있지 않은지?

좀 고민해 봐야 할 문제같네요….

저는 이 친구(분?)의 의견에 동감하고 있습니다만,

운영진 여러분도 한 번 생각해 보시라는 뜻으로 올려놓습니다.

hanmaumy님도 잘 판단하시리라 생각합니다.

참고로, Lovmo씨의 site는 여기,

http://www.geocities.com/mlovmo/

Gerry Bevers의 Site는 여깁니다.http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/Gerry Bevers가 활동중인 혐한 site는 여기구요.http://www.occidentalism.org
이 곳 site에서 왜구들과 토론하면서, 한국측에 대한 대응 논리를 만들고 있습니다. ——————————————————한마음님.

번거롭게 생각하실지도 모르지만, 제가 받은 mail을 그대로 님께
송부해 드려야 할 것 같습니다.
저도 영어가 능숙하지는 않습니다만, 가능한 범위에서 해석도 같이 달아드립니다.
쪽지로 보내드리니까 문장 길이에 한계가 있어서,
mail로 송부해 드립니다.

님이 독도에 대한 연구를 시작하게 된 계기가 저와 같다면,
이 사람의 취지에 대해서는 충분히 공감하실 수 있으리라 생각합니다.

Mr. Steve barber ( [email protected] )
현재 용인 거주중인 것으로 알고 있고, Wife는 한국인이랍니다.
공감하신다면, 이분 mail로 한 번 연락주시기 바랍니다.

감사합니다.

—–Original Message—–
From: steve barber [mailto:[email protected]]
Sent: Thursday, August 31, 2006 1:01 AM
To: [email protected]
Subject: RE: Hanmaumy

Dr Mr Cho:

I went onto Hanmaumy’s website and just by the visual images I saw I can say
his website is the best I’ve ever seen !! I’m very impressed.
(한마음님의 웹사이트에 가봤다네요… 이제까지 봤던것 중에 가장 훌륭했답니다. 감동먹었다는군요)

The problem is that it is all in Korean language. Koreans already believe
Dokdo is Korean land so Hanmaumy is in a sense wasting his time. We must get
this valuable information out to the global community. If the Dokdo issue
ever goes to the ICJ it is absolutely necessary that all of the related
information be available to the public in English.
(문제는 한국어랍니다. 한국인들은 이미 독도가 한국땅인것 처럼 생각하고있고, 그래서 한마음씨가 시간낭비라고 생각하고 있는것 같다고(?)… 하지만, 가치있는 정보는 글로벌 커뮤니티로 제공해야 한다고… 만약 독도가 ICJ로 간다면, 많은 자료들이 영문으로 공개되어야 한다고…)

Mr Cho I must stress these days there are more Japanese working with
foreigners promoting Takeshima is Japanese and they are doing it in English
while working with idiots like Gerry Bevers.
Like after WW2 Korea isn’t getting its message out there about Dokdo.
(요즘 점차 많은 일본인들이 외국인들과 함께 타케시마가 일본의 것이라는 자료를 영문으로 작업중에 있고, Gerry Bevers와 같은 또라이들과 함께 작업중입니다. 2차대전 직후와 마찬가지로 한국은 독도에 대한 메세지를 밖으로 보내고 있지 않고 있다고 합니다.)
-> 참고로 Gerry Bevers는 인천 거주하고 있는 호주인인데, 상당한 혐한입니다. 엔조이재팬에서 활동중인 일본인들과 각종 자료들을 영문으로 번역해서 그의 Blog에 올려놓고 있습니다. 저도 이 사람 Blog에서 토론하다가, 토론을 보게된 Steve씨가 제게 연락해서 연결되었습니다.

That being said, Mr Lovmo’s site is up and running and I’ve been working on
my own to try to gather information and translate it but to be honest my
lack of ability in Korean language makes it impossible to gather images on
some of these Korean National Archives Websites because they are totally in
Korean.
(Lovmo씨의 site는 이미 만들어져 있고, 지금껏 자기 혼자서 자료모으는 작업을 해 왔지만, 솔직히 한국어 능력이 떨어지기 때문에 자료를 모으는 것에 한계를 느낀답니다.)We should use Mr Lovmo’s site because it is already quite popular and it has
the greatest amount of exposure on the English/Foreign Internet.
(Lovmo씨의 site는 이미 외국에 많이 알려져 있고, 영문권이나 외국 인터넷에 많이 노출되어 있기때문에 Lovmo씨의 site를 이용해야한다네요?)

Please me must work together to get the message out there. I will do my
best. In addtion please tell Hanmaumy I am going to gather images from his
website and translate as well as I can for Mark.
I would love to meet both of you someday.
(한국 밖으로 메세지를 보내기 위해 같이 협력하잡니다. 자기는 최선을 다하겠다고. 한마디 더하면, 한마음님의 site에서 자료를 좀 가져가겠답니다. 그리고, 우리 둘을 한 번 만났으면 한다네요…)

Yours Truly:
Steve

The problem is that it is all in Korean language. Koreans already believeDokdo is Korean land so Hanmaumy is in a sense wasting his time. We must getthis valuable information out to the global community. If the Dokdo issueever goes to the ICJ it is absolutely necessary that all of the relatedinformation be available to the public in English.Mr Cho I must stress these days there are more Japanese working withforeigners promoting Takeshima is Japanese and they are doing it in Englishwhile working with idiots like Gerry Bevers.Like after WW2 Korea isn’t getting its message out there about Dokdo.That being said, Mr Lovmo’s site is up and running and I’ve been working onmy own to try to gather information and translate it but to be honest mylack of ability in Korean language makes it impossible to gather images onsome of these Korean National Archives Websites because they are totally inKorean.Please me must work together to get the message out there. I will do mybest. In addtion please tell Hanmaumy I am going to gather images from hiswebsite and translate as well as I can for Mark.I would love to meet both of you someday.Yours Truly:SteveThe problem is that it is all in Korean language. Koreans already believeDokdo is Korean land so Hanmaumy is in a sense wasting his time. We must getthis valuable information out to the global community. If the Dokdo issueever goes to the ICJ it is absolutely necessary that all of the relatedinformation be available to the public in English.Mr Cho I must stress these days there are more Japanese working withforeigners promoting Takeshima is Japanese and they are doing it in Englishwhile working with idiots like Gerry Bevers.Like after WW2 Korea isn’t getting its message out there about Dokdo.That being said, Mr Lovmo’s site is up and running and I’ve been working onmy own to try to gather information and translate it but to be honest mylack of ability in Korean language makes it impossible to gather images onsome of these Korean National Archives Websites because they are totally inKorean.Please me must work together to get the message out there. I will do mybest. In addtion please tell Hanmaumy I am going to gather images from hiswebsite and translate as well as I can for Mark.I would love to meet both of you someday.Yours Truly:Steve———-
Oh by the way Mr Cho.

You must tell Hanmaumy I have a great deal difficulty accessing his website.
Whenever I try to hotlink to his page it defaults back to some Mireen24
homepage. It is an incredible headache and it is greatly affecting the
amount of hits he will get from the public.

Please notify him immediately.
(한마음님의 Site에 접속하기가 굉장히 어렵답니다. 접속하려고 할 때마다, 미리내24의 디폴트페이지로 넘어가는데, 아주 골치가 아프다네요. 제일 마지막 문장은 ?, 하여간 님께 연락해 달랍니다.)

In addition I don’t think you understood my last post. I am familiar with
the Korean ri being about 400 meters but if you look at some old maps you
can see they must have used a much smaller distance for the ri. For example
the distance is shown as 800 ri from Korea to Ulleungdo on some maps. I
don’t understand this measuring system.
(이것은 제가 질문의 요지를 잘못듣고 회신한 것에 대해 보완질문 입니다. 어떤 한국고지도들에 보면 한반도와 울릉도가 800리라고 나온게 있다는데, 이해하지 못하겠답니다. 나도 잘 이해가 안돼네요..)

Posted by Gerry-Bevers, filed under Racist Industrial Complex. Date: September 23, 2006, 8:24 pm | 55 Comments »

Kudos to University of Hawaii student ‘John’ for finding this. The mysterious Kushibo was briefly questioned about a transportation issue in Hawaii by a TV station. Fast forward to 1:37 to see Kushibo.

Really good move on the part of the Hawaiian TV station to ask the opinion of a guy that just arrived in Hawaii. Seeing his face, one really has to wonder how much ‘Korean ancestry’ he really has. He also said he was part Japanese.

Kushibo’s lesbian republican sock was nowhere to be seen and is presumably vacationing in a Siberian gulag.

For a background on what this is all about see -

My original post exposing Kushibo and his ‘lesbian republican’ sock puppet

The Party Pooper

BigHominid

Lost Nomad

Seoul Hero

USinKorea and follow up

Migukin

eclexys

The Korea Liberator

Have fun reading, because it is quite an interesting story. The Party Poopers take down of Kushibo is particularly funny.

Posted by Matt, filed under Anti-Americanism, finger chopping wacky, Racist Industrial Complex, Scams. Date: September 21, 2006, 9:54 pm | 20 Comments »

1794 Ulleungdo Inspection: Gajido (가지도) and more dead sea lions

The following is the report of a 1794 Korean inspection of Ulleungdo and my analysis of it. The report is significant because it refers to an island named Gajido (可支島), which Koreans claim was a reference to present-day “Dokdo” (Liancourt Rocks). However, there is little or no basis for such a claim since the report mentioned no coordinates for Gajido (可支島), no bearing, distance, or description. Also, there are no other references to the island in Korean historical documents. In fact, there is no solid evidence in any Korean document or on any Korean map before 1905 that would support the claim that Koreans even knew about “Dokdo” (Liancourt Rocks). So why do Koreans claim that Gajido was a reference to “Dokdo”? Well, they base their claim solely on the fact that sea lions lived on both Gajido (可支島) and on “Dokdo” (Liancourt Rocks). In fact, the name, Gajido (可支島), means “Seal Island.” The problem with that logic, however, is that it ignores the fact that sea lions or seals also lived on Ulleungdo.

In my analysis of the 1794 report, I will try to show that Gajido was not a reference to “Dokdo,” but was simply a reference to a place, rock, or island on or around Ulleungdo. In fact, an  1886 inspection of Ulleungdo, which you can read about here, said that sea lions or seals were hunted on Ulleungdo. That report, in itself, pours cold water on Korea’s “Gajido-was-Dokdo” claim, but the 1894 report below will pour even more.

An 1882 map of Ulleungdo shows a cave on the west coast of the island named “Seal Cave” (可支窟), You can see the 1882 map here. Moveover, on modern maps of Ulleungdo, there is a cave on the west coast of Ulleungdo located at about the same location as the cave shown on the 1882 map. The cave on modern maps, however, is called Gajaet-gul (가잿굴), which appears to mean “Crawfish Cave.” You can see it on this modern map of Ulleungdo.

I think Gajaet-gul (가잿굴) was originally Gaje-gul, which would mean “Seal Cave.” The “t” sound in the word “gajaet-gul” is added to connect the word “gajae” (crawfish) to the word “gul” (cave).

Gaji-eo (可支魚) was the Chinese-character-based word for “sea lions” or “seals” in old Korean documents, but the pure Korean word for sea lions that is used today is “gangchi” (강치). In the Ulleungdo dialect, however, “gangchi” (강치) is pronounced as “gaje” (가제), which is very similar in sound to gajae (가재), which means “crawfish.” I think the cave labeled as gajaet-gul (가잿굴) on modern maps of Ulleungdo was originally pronounced as gaje-gul (가제굴). I base my claim on the fact that marine product lists from Ulleungdo never listed “crawfish” (가재) but did list “sea lions” (可支魚). You can see sea lions listed as a product of Ulleungdo on this 1750s Korean map of the island. Also, crawfish are freshwater animals, not saltwater.

Also, there is a rock off the southern tip of Ulleungdo called “Gajae Rock” (가재바위). You can see the rock here on this closeup map of the southern tip of Ulleungdo. Again, notice that the word “gajae” (가재), which can mean “crawfish” in Korean, is used to name the rock. However, it makes no sense that a rock surrounded by salt water would be named “Crawfish Rock” since crawfish are freshwater animals. It is much more likely that “gajae” (가재) was referring to sea lions since the Ulleungdo pronunciation for sea lion is “gaje” (가제), which is only a slight difference in pronunciation. By the way, I am very suspicious of why Koreans chose to use “gajae” to name these places instead “of gaje.”  

Anyway, I think Gajae Rock (가재바위) could have been what the 1794 Korean report referred to as “Gajido” (可支島). I base my claim not only on the fact that the name of the rock sounds almost exactly like the Ulleungdo pronunciation for “sea lion,” but also on the fact that this 1863 British map of Ulleungdo labels that southern tip of the island as “Seal Pt.” (Seal Point).

Of course, Gajido (可支島) could have also been referring to a rock on the west coast of Ulleungdo in front of or near “Seal Cave,” especially since there is a rock in that area called “Saja Bawui” (사자바위), which means “Lion Rock.” You can see the rock on this modern map of Ulleungdo. It is possible that “Lion Rock” may have been a reference to “seal lions” since Koreans also use the word “bada saja” (바다사자) to refer to sea lions. “Bada saja” literally means “sea lion.”

Here is the Chinese-character based 1794 report, a Korean translation, and my translation:

○江原道觀察使沈晋賢狀啓言:
 
鬱陵島搜討, 間二年, 使邊將輪回擧行, 已有定式, 故搜討官越松萬戶韓昌國處, 發關分付矣。 該萬戶牒呈: “四月二十一日, 幸得順風, 糧饌雜物分, 載四隻船, 與倭學李福祥及上下員役、格軍八十名, 同日未時量, 到于大洋中, 則酉時, 北風猝起, 雲霧四塞, 驟雨霹靂, 一時齊發, 四船各自分散, 莫知所向。 萬戶收拾精神, 戎服禱海, 多散糧米, 以餽海神後, 使格軍輩, 擧火應之, 則二隻船擧火而應, 一隻船漠然無火矣。 二十二日寅時, 怒濤漸息, 只見遠海之中, 二隻船帆自南而來。 格軍輩擧手指東曰: ‘彼雲霧中隱隱如雲者, 疑是島中上峰也。’ 萬戶詳細遠望, 則果是島形也。 親自擊皷, 激勵格軍, 卽爲到泊於島之西面黃土丘尾津。 登山看審, 則自谷至中峰三十餘里, 而山形重疊, 谷水成川, 其中有可作水田六十餘石下種之地。 谷則狹窄, 有瀑布, 而左爲黃土丘尾窟, 右爲屛風石。 其上又有香木亭, 故斫取香木, 而以間年斫取之故, 漸就稀少。 二十四日到桶丘尾津, 則谷形如桶, 前有一巖在海中, 與島相距可爲五十步, 而高近數十丈, 周回皆是絶壁。 谷口巖石層層, 僅僅攀登而見之, 則山高谷深, 樹木參天, 雜草茂密, 通涉無路。 二十五日到長作地浦, 谷口果有竹田, 非但稀踈, 擧皆體小。 其中擇其稍大者斫取後, 仍向東南楮田洞, 則自洞口至中峰爲數十里許, 而洞裏廣闊基址, 顯有三處, 可作水田數十石下種之地。 前有三島, 在北曰防牌島, 在中曰竹島, 在東曰瓮島。 三島相距, 不過百餘步, 島之周回, 各爲數十把, 險巖嵂屼, 難以登覽, 仍爲止宿。 二十六日轉向可支島, 四五箇可支魚, 驚駭躍出, 形若水牛。 砲手齊放, 捉得二首, 而丘尾津山形, 最爲奇異, 入谷數里, 則昔日人家遺址, 宛然尙存。 左右山谷, 甚爲幽深, 難於登陟。 仍遍看竹巖、帿布巖、孔巖、錐山等諸處, 行到桶丘尾, 禱山祭海, 待風留住。 蓋島周回, 摠爲論之, 則南北七八十里許, 東西五六十里許。 環海則皆是層巖絶壁, 四方山谷, 則間有昔日人居之土址, 而田土可墾處, 合爲數百石下種之地。 樹木則香、栢、蘗、檜、桑、榛, 雜草則靑芹、葵、艾、苧、楮。 其餘異樹奇草, 不知名, 難以盡記。 羽蟲則雁、鷹、鷗、鷺, 毛蟲則貓、鼠, 海産則藿、鰒而已。 三十日發船, 初八日還鎭。 島中所産可支魚皮二令、篁竹三箇、紫檀香二吐莫、石間朱五升、圖形一本, 監封上使” 云。 幷上送于備邊司。

 

강원도 관찰사 심진현(沈晉賢)이 장계하였다.
 
“울릉도의 수토(搜討)를 2년에 한 번씩 변장(邊將)으로 하여금 돌아가며 거행하기로 이미 정식(定式)을 삼고 있기 때문에, 수토관 월송 만호(越松萬戶) 한창국(韓昌國)에게 관문을 띄워 분부하였습니다. 월송 만호의 첩정(牒呈)에 ‘4월 21일 다행히도 순풍을 얻어서 식량과 반찬거리를 4척의 배에 나누어 싣고 왜학(倭學) 이복상(李福祥) 및 상하 원역(員役)과 격군(格軍) 80명을 거느리고 같은 날 미시(未時)쯤에 출선하여 바다 한가운데에 이르렀는데, 유시(酉時)에 갑자기 북풍이 일며 안개가 사방에 자욱하게 끼고, 우뢰와 함께 장대비가 쏟아졌습니다. 일시에 출발한 4척의 배가 뿔뿔이 흩어져서 어디로 가고 있는지 알 수 없었는데, 만호가 정신을 차려 군복을 입고 바다에 기원한 다음 많은 식량을 물에 뿌려 해신(海神)을 먹인 뒤에 격군들을 시켜 횃불을 들어 호응케 했더니, 두 척의 배는 횃불을 들어서 대답하고 한 척의 배는 불빛이 전혀 보이지 않았습니다. 22일 인시(寅時)에 거센 파도가 점차 가라앉으면서 바다 멀리서 두 척의 배 돛이 남쪽에 오고 있는 것만을 바라보고 있던 참에 격군들이 동쪽을 가리키며 ‘저기 안개 속으로 은은히 구름처럼 보이는 것이 아마 섬 안의 높은 산봉우리일 것이다.’ 하기에, 만호가 자세히 바라보니 과연 그것은 섬의 형태였습니다. 직접 북을 치며 격군을 격려하여 곧장 섬의 서쪽 황토구미진(黃土丘尾津)에 정박하여 산으로 올라가서 살펴보니, 계곡에서 중봉(中峰)까지의 30여 리에는 산세가 중첩되면서 계곡의 물이 내를 이루고 있었는데, 그 안에는 논 60여 섬지기의 땅이 있고, 골짜기는 아주 좁고 폭포가 있었습니다. 그 왼편은 황토구미굴(黃土丘尾窟)이 있고 오른편은 병풍석(屛風石)이 있으며 또 그 위에는 향목정(香木亭)이 있는데, 예전에 한 해 걸러씩 향나무를 베어 갔던 까닭에 향나무가 점차 듬성듬성해지고 있습니다.
 
24일에 통구미진(桶丘尾津)에 도착하니 계곡의 모양새가 마치 나무통과 같고 그 앞에 바위가 하나 있는데, 바닷속에 있는 그 바위는 섬과의 거리가 50보(步)쯤 되고 높이가 수십 길이나 되며, 주위는 사면이 모두 절벽이었습니다. 계곡 어귀에는 암석이 층층이 쌓여 있는데, 근근이 기어올라가 보니 산은 높고 골은 깊은데다 수목은 하늘에 맞닿아 있고 잡초는 무성하여 길을 헤치고 나갈 수가 없었습니다.
 
25일에 장작지포(長作地浦)의 계곡 어귀에 도착해보니 과연 대밭이 있는데, 대나무가 듬성듬성할 뿐만 아니라 거의가 작달막하였습니다. 그중에서 조금 큰 것들만 베어낸 뒤에, 이어 동남쪽 저전동(楮田洞)으로 가보니 골짜기 어귀에서 중봉에 이르기까지 수십 리 사이에 세 곳의 널찍한 터전이 있어 수십 섬지기의 땅이었습니다. 또 그 앞에 세 개의 섬이 있는데, 북쪽의 것은 방패도(防牌島), 가운데의 것은 죽도(竹島), 동쪽의 것은 옹도(瓮島)이며, 세 섬 사이의 거리는 1백여 보(步)에 불과하고 섬의 둘레는 각각 수십 파(把)씩 되는데, 험한 바위들이 하도 쭈뼛쭈뼛하여 올라가 보기가 어려웠습니다.
 
거기서 자고 26일에 가지도(可支島)로 가니, 네댓 마리의 가지어(可支魚)가 놀라서 뛰쳐나오는데, 모양은 수소와 같았고, 포수들이 일제히 포를 쏘아 두 마리를 잡았습니다. 그리고 구미진(丘尾津)의 산세가 가장 기이한데, 계곡으로 십여 리를 들어가니 옛날 인가의 터전이 여태까지 완연히 남아 있고, 좌우의 산곡이 매우 깊숙하여 올라가기는 어려웠습니다. 이어 죽암(竹巖)•후포암(帿布巖)•공암(孔巖)•추산(錐山) 등의 여러 곳을 둘려보고 나서 통구미(桶丘尾)로 가서 산과 바다에 고사를 지낸 다음, 바람이 가라앉기를 기다려 머무르고 있었습니다.
 
대저 섬의 둘레를 총괄하여 논한다면 남북이 70, 80리 남짓에 동서가 50, 60리 남짓하고 사면이 모두 층암 절벽이며, 사방의 산곡에 이따금씩 옛날 사람이 살던 집터가 있고 전지로 개간할 만한 곳은 도합 수백 섬지기쯤 되었으며, 수목으로는 향나무•잣나무•황벽나무•노송나무•뽕나무•개암나무, 잡초로는 미나리•아욱•쑥•모시풀•닥나무가 주종을 이루고, 그 밖에도 이상한 나무들과 풀은 이름을 몰라서 다 기록하기 어려웠습니다. 우충(羽虫)으로는 기러기•매•갈매기•백로가 있고, 모충(毛虫)으로는 고양이•쥐가 있으며, 해산물로는 미역과 전복뿐이었습니다.
 
30일에 배를 타고 출발하여 새달 8일에 본진으로 돌아왔습니다. 섬 안의 산물인 가지어 가죽 2벌, 황죽(篁竹) 3개, 자단향(紫檀香) 2토막, 석간주(石間朱) 5되, 도형(圖形) 1벌을 감봉(監封)하여 올립니다.’ 하였으므로, 함께 비변사로 올려보냅니다.
 
 

Gangwondo Governor Sim jin-hyeon reported to the king.

I sent a order to Wolsong Commander Inspector Han Chang-sik to inspect Ulleungdo. These inspections are officially held every year and are rotated between the two frontier commanders.

The Wolsong commander reported, “On April 21st, we got a favorable wind and divided and loaded provisions, including foodstuff, on four ships and set sail between 1 and 3 p.m. with Japanese Expert Lee Bok-sang, various ranks of civil servants, and eighty sailors.”

“In the middle of the sea at between 5 and 7 p.m., we got a sudden wind from the north and heavy fog in all directions. We got thunder and heavy rain. All four of our ships were scattered, and we lost sight of each other. The commander regained his wits, put on his military uniform, prayed to the sea god, and scattered food in the water to feed him. Then he ordered the sailors to hold up torches and call out to the other ships. Two ships held up torches and answered the call, but there was no sign of firelight from one ship.”

“Between 3 and 5 a.m. on the 22nd, the violent waves gradually lessened, and we could see in the distance the sails of two ships coming south. Then the sailors pointed to the east and said, “That thing over there in the fog that looks like a threatening cloud is probably the island’s highest peak.” When the commander looked carefully, it was the shape of an island.”

“The commander, himself, beat the drum and urged the sailors on. We soon anchored at the Hwangto-gumi Landing (黃土丘尾津) and went up the mountain to look around. It was about thirty ri from the valley to the central peak over a series of overlapping ridges. The waters from the valley came together to form a stream, and inside (the valley) was about 60-seomjigi of rice-paddy land. The valley was narrow, and there was a waterfall. The Hwangto-gumi Cave (黃土丘尾窟) was on the left and Byeongpung Rock (屛風石) was on the right. Up above there was Hyangmok Pavilion (香木亭). The juniper trees (香木) there were scare because they had previously been cut down every other year in former times.”

“On the 24th, we arrived at Tong-gumi Landing (桶丘尾津). The valley was shaped just like a wooden barrel, and there was a rock in front about fifty paces offshore. It was tens of gil high. There were cliffs on all sides. There were mounds of rock piled up at the entrance of the valley. With difficulty we crawled up the valley, but we could not fight our way through because the peaks were high, the valleys were deep, the trees reached to the sky, and the weeds were thick.”

“On the 25th, we arrived at the valley entrance of Port Jangjakji (長斫之浦). As expected, we found a bamboo thicket, but the bamboo was not only sparse, it was also stumpy. After we cut down some of the bigger bamboo, we headed to “Southeast Jeojeondong (仍向東南楮田洞). Between the tens of ri from the valley entrance to the central peak, there were three areas wide enough for tens of seomjigi of farmland. Also, there were three islands in front. Bangpaedo (防牌島) was the northern island, Jukdo (竹島) the middle, and Ongdo (翁島) was to the east. The distance between the three islands was only about 100 paces, and the circumference of each was tens of pa (把). They looked difficult to climb because the rocks were steep and very towering.”

“We slept there and on the 26th, we changed direction (reversed course) and went to Gajido (可支島), where we surprised four or five sea lions that dashed out. They looked like water cows. Our riflemen all fired at once and got two of them. The geographical features of the beach landing (丘尾津) was the strangest thing. We went about ten ri into the valley, where we found the remains of what were clearly ancient dwellings. On both sides, the hills and ravines were so deep that they were difficult to climb up.

Next we looked around several places, including Jukam (竹巖), Hupoam (帿布巖), Gongam (孔巖), and Chusan (錐山). Then we went to Tonggumi (通邱尾) and made offerings to the mountain and sea (gods). We stayed there and waited for the wind to die down.”

“Generally speaking, the circumference of the island is seventy to eighty ri from north to south and fifty to sixty ri from east to west. All four sides are stratified rock cliffs. There are remains of ancient dwelling in various places in the valleys around the island. Land suitable for rice paddies and fields totals in the hundreds of seomjigi. Trees on the island included juniper, Korean nut pine, amur cork, old pine, mulberry, and hazel. The main species of plants are dropwort, mallow, mugwort, ramie, and paper mulberry. In addition, there are strange trees and grasses that were difficult to record because their names were unknown. Birds on the island included wild geese, hawks, seagulls, and white herons. Furry animals were cats and rats. Sea products were only brown seaweed and abalone.”

“On the 30th, we boarded our ship and set sail. On the 8th of the new month, we returned to our home base. The products from the island were two seal skins, three trunks of common Korean bamboo, two blocks of rosewood incense, five doi of red ocher, and one map, which were all packaged and sealed and given to our superiors.”

I send this together with the products (mentioned above to the bibyeonsa (備邊司).”

Four ships carrying more than eighty men left for Ulleungdo at between 1 and 3 p.m. on April 21st. They ran into fog, rain, and heavy seas, and one ship appears to have been lost. The remaining ships arrived at Hwangto-gumi Landing (黃土丘尾津) sometime on the 22nd, which is a pretty fast crossing. Hwangtogumi was a beach on the northwest corner of Ulleungdo at or near present-day Taeha Harbor. You can see Hwangto-gumi (大黃土邱尾) on the following 1882 map of the northwest corner of Ulleungdo.

The report said that it was about thirty ri from the valley entrance to the central peak of the island. It also reported that the inspection party saw a cave, a waterfall, and a rock. The rock was called Byeongpung Rock (屛風石). It also said that Hyangmok Pavilion (香木亭) was up above the area. The waterfall, the cave, and the pavillion were also mentioned in this 1786 survey report of Ulleungdo.

On the 24th, the party sailed south and arrived at the Tong-gumi Landing (桶丘尾津). You can see Tong-gumi on the following 1882 map of the southwest corner of Ulleungdo:

The report described the valley at Tong-gumi as being “wooden-barrel” shaped and as having piled mounds of stone at the entrance. Those mounds of stone may have been graves. It also said that there was a large rock fifty paces offshore.  Tong-gumi is still listed on Korean maps today, and the rock that was mentioned in the 1794 report was almost certainly present-day Geobuk Bawui (거북바위), which means “Turtle Rock.” You can see a picture of Turtle Rock here.

On the 25th, the inspection party sailed around the southern-most point of the island to Port Jangjakji (長斫之浦), which can also be seen on the 1882 map shown above. Port Jangjakji was probably located near or at present-day Sadong Harbor (사동항).

From Port Jangjakji, the report said the inspection party headed to “Southeast Jeojeon-dong” (仍向東南楮田洞), which suggests that there was more than one Jeojeon-dong. Actually, the following 1750s map shows a Jeojeon-dong (苧田洞) on the northeast corner of Ulleungdo, though the character for “Jeo” is different.

The “Jeojeon” (苧田) in Jeojeon-dong (苧田洞) just means “ramie field,” so it is possible that there were more such fields on the island. In fact, on present-day maps of Ulleungdo, there is a port on the southeast corner of Ulleungdo called Jeodong Harbor (苧洞港), which is probably where “Southeast Jeojeon-dong” (東南楮田洞) was located. Afterall, it would only require dropping the “field” (田) character to make the new name.

From Southeast Jeojeon-dong, the report said it was tens of ri from the valley entrance to the central peak. The report also said that three islands could be seen from Southeast Jeojeon-dong. The northern island was Bangpaedo (防牌島), which I believe was present-day Gwaneumdo. The middle island was Jukdo (竹島), which was most likely present-day Jukdo. And the island just to the east of Southeast Jeojeon-dong was Ongdo(瓮島), which means “Pot Island.” In pure Korean, Ongdo would be pronounced as Dokseom (독섬), and in mixed Sino-Korean and pure Korea, it would be “Dokdo” (독도).

If Southeast Jeojeon-dong were present-day Jeodong Harbor, that would mean that Ongdo (Dokdo) was either present-day Chotdae-am (촛대암), which is right in front of Jeodong Harbor, or present-day Bukjeo Bawui (북저바위), which is farther out in the water.  Here is a picture that shows Gwaneumdo (觀音島), Jukdo (竹島), and Bukjeo Bawui (북저바위) all together. The problem with the description of the three islands, however, is that the report said that they were only about 100 paces apart from each other, which is not the case.

The report said that on the 26th, the inspection party changed directions, which can mean they reversed course, and headed to Gajido (轉向可支島). This suggests that Gajido (可支島) was somewhere back in the direction that had come, which means they headed back southwest. I think they were heading back to either the southern tip of Ulleungdo or to Seal Cave on the west side of the island. They may have missed the opportunity to kill some sea lions on their first trip around the point and went back hoping to surprise any sea lions that had come back up out of the water.

Interestingly, the Korean translation does not say the inspection party changed or reversed course, but just said “they went to Gajido” [가지도(可支島)로 가니...] I wonder why?

At Gajido, the inspection party surprised four or five sea lions that “suddenly dashed out” (驚駭躍出).  Here is the relevant passage:

We slept there (Southeast Jeojeondong), and on the 26th, we changed direction (reversed course) and went to Gajido (可支島), where we surprised four or five sea lions that dashed out. They looked like water buffalo. Our riflemen all fired at once and got two of them. The geographical features of the beach landing (丘尾津) was the strangest thing. We went about ten ri into the valley, where we found the remains of what were clearly ancient dwellings. On both sides, the hills and ravines were so high and deep that they were difficult to climb up.

If the sea lions were surprised by the inspection party, they would have dashed “into the water,” not dashed “out of it.” That suggests that the sea lions came out of something, possibly a cave. If it were a cave, it would probably be the same cave that the sea lions dashed out of during the 1886 inspection. Here is the relevant passage from that inspection:

We advanced to Gaji Beach (可支仇味) and found two caves in the side of the mountain. It was too difficult to calculate their depth. We surprised some sea lions that dashed out (of a cave). All our riflemen fired at once and got two of them before they could get into the water.”

Notice that immediately after the 1794 report said they killed two sea lions, it started describing Gumi Landing (丘尾津), which just means something like “beach landing.” In other words, it seemed to be describing the beach at Gajido (可支島), not some new beach since the beach was not named. So far all the beach landings have had, at least, a 1-character name in front of gumi (丘尾), which seems to mean “beach.” For example, Hwangto-gumi (黃土丘尾) and Tong-gumi (桶丘尾) are Hwangto Beach and Tong Beach, respectively. Therefore, by simply saying Gumi Landing (丘尾津), we can assume the report was talking about the beach where they killed the seal lions, which could have been the “Gaji-gumi” (可支仇味) mentioned in the 1786 survey report.  By the way, “Gaji-gumi” means “Seal Beach.” Anyway, if it were referring to the beach they were at, then it would mean that they could not have been at “Dokdo” since the report said they walked ten ri into the valley in front of the beach. Ten ri would be about four kilometers, which is longer than the whole island of “Dokdo” (Liancourt Rocks), much less any valley on “Dokdo.” Besides, the report also said that there were remains of ancient dwellings, which would also help to eliminate “Dokdo.”

It seems obvious from the above description that Gajido (可支島) was not a reference to “Dokdo” (Liancourt Rocks). It is simply ridiculous for the Korean government to claim that Gajido (可支島) was an old name for “Dokdo” based only on the mention of “sea lions,” given the fact that sea lions were also found on Ulleungdo.

After Gajido (可支島), the report summaries the rest of their inspection by saying they visited the rocks off the north shore of Ulleungdo and then went back to Tong-gumi (桶丘尾) on the southwest side of the island to wait for calm weather to sail back to the Korean mainland. They finally set sail on April 30th  and arrived back at their home base on May 8th, which means it took them more than a week to get back.

The report said that Ulleungdo was seventy to eighty ri from north to south and fifty to sixty ri from east to west, but I am not sure how they got those measurements since the report only mentioned their taking two measurements.

Also, though the 1786 report mentioned sea lions as part of the products found on Ulleungdo, sea lions were not included on the initial list of products in the 1794 report. The report, however, did mention that sea lion skins were part of the products brought back from Ulleungdo.

Even if people do not agree completely with my interpretation of the above report, there is nothing in the report, except the mention of sea lions, that suggests that Gajido (可支島) was a reference to “Dokdo” (Liancourt Rocks). But sea lions were also found on Ulleungdo, so it is ridiculous to make such a claim. Moreover, there was other evidence in the report that tells us that Gajido could not have been “Dokdo,” including mention of a valley near Gajido that was at least four kilometers in length, which is longing than the whole island of Ulleungdo. 

Gajido (可支島) was almost certainly a place on or just offshore of Ulleungdo. The Korean government should be ashamed of itself for claiming that it was an old name for “Dokdo.”

Links to More Posts on Takeshima/Dokdo (With Japanese translations)

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 12

Posted by Gerry-Bevers, filed under Verus Historia. Date: September 21, 2006, 2:44 pm | 26 Comments »

« Previous Entries