21  Jan
U;Nee suicides

yuni

Just a couple of weeks after I posted this U;Nee music video, she has suicided.

Pop singer Yuni was found dead on Sunday after an apparent suicide at her home in Inchon City, west of Seoul, according to police.

Investigators presumed that Yuni, a 26-year-old actress-turned-singer, killed herself around noon, quoting her 71-year-old grandmother as stating that she found the body hanging from the bar of a closet with a white waistband around her neck.

The grandmother, identified as Lee, reported the case to police right after she found the body upon returning home from church.

Yuni’s mother told reporters at the mortuary that her daughter had been suffering from depression. “She was an introverted child, and it seems she has been hurt many times as she debuted at an early age,” she said.

The news struck her fans by surprise especially because Yuni was scheduled to release her third album today and to make a music video.

Shocking.

Posted by Matt, filed under Music. Date: January 21, 2007, 2:30 pm | 29 Comments »

The following map is called the Ulleungdo-Doheyong (鬱陵島圖形 – 울릉도도형). The date of the map is not completely certain, but it seems to have been made in 1711, after a survey expedition of Ulleungdo by Samcheok commander Park Chang-seok (朴昌錫). This may have been the first of several similar maps that would follow.

 
Map 1: Ulleungdo-Dohyeong (鬱陵島圖形) ca. 1711

All of the rocks and islets offshore are labeled as “Rocky Peaks” (石峯 – 석봉), except for Elephant Rock, which is labeled as “Hole Rock” (穴岩 – 혈암).


Map 2: Ulleungdo-Dohyeong (鬱陵島圖形) Northeast Section

Only one island on the map is named.


Map 3: Ulleungdo-Dohyeong (鬱陵島圖形) Southeast Section

The island is off the east shore and is labeled as 所謂 于山島 – 海長竹田 (소위 우산도  – 해장죽전), which means “the so-called Usando – fields of haejangjuk.”


Map 4: Ulleungdo-Dohyeong (鬱陵島圖形) East Shore

Haejangjuk (海藏竹) is a type of bamboo that can grow 20 feet tall and has a diameter of 1.5 inches. Its scientific classification is Pleioblastus simonii.


Map 5: Ulleungdo-Dohyeong (鬱陵島圖形) Usando

The bamboo fields on Usando are the only ones on the map where the type of bamboo is actually named.

The Gyujanggak Map & Document Museum at Seoul National says that the Usando on the map seems to be “Dokdo” (여기 于山島라 기입한 섬이 바로 獨島를 지칭하는 듯하다). However, because the island is located off the east coast of Ullleungdo in almost the exact location as Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo, and because the island had fields of bamboo that could grow twenty feet high, I think Seoul National University is full of crap mistaken.

Dokdo (Liancourt Rocks) is essentially just two barren rocks that did not have the soil to grow the kind of bamboo mentioned above. The Usando shown on the above map was almost certainly Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo (竹島 – 죽도), which is approximately 2.2 kilometers off the northeast shore of Ulleungdo. By the way, Jukdo means “Bamboo Island” in English.

Japanese Translation Provided by Kaneganese

(Gerryの投稿の日本語訳です。)

以下の地図は鬱陵島圖形と呼ばれるものです。発行年は不明ですが、地図に押されている押印(備邊司印)から1884年頃のものと考えられています。

 地図1:鬱陵島圖形 (1884頃)

沖にある岩や小島は全て“石峯”と名づけられていますが、象岩のみ“穴岩”と標記されています。

 地図2:北東部拡大図

一つの島だけ名前がついています。

 地図3:南東部拡大図

その島は東の沖にあり、所謂 于山島 – 海長竹田〈いわゆる于山島ー海長竹の竹林)と標記されています。

 地図4:東部沖拡大図

海藏竹(日本名は女竹?)は、高さが20フィート〈約6m9.6cm〉、幅が1.5インチ(約3.8cm)にもなる竹の種類です。学名はPleioblastus simoniiです。

 地図5:于山島拡大図

于山島の竹林は、地図上で唯一竹の種類が記載された場所です。

ソウル大学奎章閣地図文献博物館は、地図の描かれた于山島が“独島”であろう (여기 于山島라 기입한 섬이 바로 獨島를 지칭하는 듯하다)、と述べています。しかし、この地図の于山島は、鬱陵島の隣にある竹嶼と、鬱陵島の東海岸沖のほぼ全く同じ場所に位置しています。それに、この島は6mも伸びる竹林があると書かれていることも合わせて、ソウル大学は、大嘘つき、いえ、お間違えになっている、と思います。

独島(Liancourt Rocks)は、そもそも不毛な2つの岩からなる島で、上記のような竹が生える土さえありません。地図に表された于山島はほぼ確実に、鬱陵島の北東沖約2.2kmというすぐ隣にある竹嶼です。ちなみに、竹嶼は、竹島のことです。

Links to More Posts on Takeshima/Dokdo (With Japanese translations)

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 12

Posted by Gerry-Bevers, filed under Verus Historia. Date: January 20, 2007, 1:06 pm | 76 Comments »

The following picture of “Dokdo” (Liancourt Rocks) was supposedly taken from Ulleungdo on January 15, 2007 with a Nikon D200 camera using a 70-300ED lens. It appears that you can see even the lighthouse on Dokdo, which is 92 kilometers southeast of Ulleungdo. Supposedly, even two mountain ridges near Samcheok City in Gangwon Province were also captured by the camera on the same day. The mountain ridges are between 130 and 150 kilometers away from Ulleungdo. Link to the Korean article.

Getting a picture of Dokdo from Ulleungdo is a big deal in Korea because Koreans consider it proof that Dokdo was recognized as Korean territory since 512 A.D. The following was written in the Annals or King Sejong:

于山武陵二島 在縣正東海中 二島相去不遠 風日淸明 則可望見 新羅時 稱于山國 一云鬱陵島

The two islands of Usan and Mu-leung are due east of the present “hyeon” (Uljin), and the distance between them is close enough that they are visible on a clear, windy day. In the time of Silla, they were called Unsan-guk or Ulleungdo.

Korean historians claim that the passage was referring to the distance between the islands of Usan and Muleung (Ulleungdo), but Japanese historians claim that it was referring to the distance between Uljin and the two islands. I agree with the Japanese and here are the reasons I gave in a previous post on this site

——————-

Okay, so where do Koreans get the idea that Usando was a reference to Dokdo? Well, they claim that the proof is in the following 1454 record, which comes from the geography text of King Sejong. The record is actually a description of Uljin-hyeon, which was the equivalent of a county in Gangwon Province. When Koreans quote the record, however, they usually omit the description of Uljin-hyeon and focus on only one or two sentences in the record. I will post the complete record because I think it is important to read the specific qoute in context.

1454 (Annals of King Sejong, Geography Text)

Uljin-hyeon
One Jihyeonsa

Originally named “Ujinya-hyeon” during Koguryeo, the name was changed to its present name during Silla and made a gun. During Koryeo it was called “Uljin-hyeon,” which is still being used during our dynasty. People in the hyeon say that in the past it has also called “Bani-gun” and Seonsa-gun.

Yaksa-jin is to the south of the hyeon, and Goljang-jin is to the north. Its boundries stretch eight ri east to the mouth of the sea, sixty-three ri west to Andong’s Socheon-hyeon in Gyeongsang Province, thirty-seven ri south to Pyeonghae, and thirty-two ri north to Samcheok.

It has 270 lakes and a population of 1,430. Its military includes thirty-eight soldiers, seventy sailors, and four fortress guards. There are five local family names: Im (林), Jang (張), Jeong (鄭), Bang (房), and Yu (劉). There is also a Min (閔) from Yeongju.

Half the land is fertile and half is not. They make their living by fishing, but they also venerate martial arts. They cultivate about 1,351 gyeol of land, of which one third is rice paddies. The land produces the five grains, mulberry, hemp, persimmons, chestnuts, pears, and paper mulberry. They paid tribute of honey, beeswax, iron, wallnuts, mushrooms, gallnut, prickly ash, brown seaweed, lacquer, cured venison, fox pelts, wildcat pelts, deerskins, tiger pelts, pig hair (used for brushes), codfish, octopus, gray mullet, abalone, and hard-shelled mussel. The medicinal herbs they have are bokryeong mushrooms, Angelica uchiyamana root, Angelica decursiva root, bletilla, Schisandra chinensis, and ginseng. They have sixty-one local products, including slender bamboo, large bamboo, and salt.

There is one porcelain pottery shop ten ri to the north at Singok-ri, and one crockery shop twelve ri to the north at Gamdae-ri. All of their products are of poor quality.

The Hwangsan Stone fortress has a circumference of 616 paces 5 cheok, and is sometimes used as a the village fortress. Inside is four springs and one pond. The pond sometimes dries up during severe dought, but the springs never do.

There is a hot springs forty-four ri to the north, west of Heungbu Horse Station at Gusu-u Mulsan-dong. There are three horse stations: Heungbu (興富), which used to be Heungbu (興府); Deoksin (德神), which used to be Deoksin (德新); and Susan (守山), which used to be Susan (壽山). There are four signal fire stations. One is said to be at Mount Jukjin, which is south of the hyeon past Mount Jeonbanin and north of Pyeonghae’s Sadong Mountain. One is said to be at Jukbyeon Point, which is north of Mount Jukjin. One is said to be at Mount Geungchuldo, which is north of Jukbyeon Point. And the last is at at Samcheok’s Mount Gagok, which is north of Mount Geungchuldo.

Two islands, Usan and Muleung, are due east of the hyeon in the middle of the sea. The distance between these two islands is not far, so they are visible on a clear, windy day. During the time of Silla they were called Usanguk or Ulleungdo. [It] has an area of 100 ri.

People had thought the land to be too rugged to subjugate. However, in the twelfth year of King Lee Jijeung (512 A.D.), Isabu became the commander of Hasula-ju (an area that was around Kangneung), and said, “The people of Usan are ignorant and savage, so since it would be difficult to subjugate them with strength, we must use tricks.” He made many ferocious animals from wood, loaded them on his warships, went to the island, and told the people there: “If you do not surrender, I will release their ferocious beasts so that they can eat you. The people of the island were afraid and came and surrendered.

In the thirteenth year of Goryeo’s Taejo (930 A.D.), the people of the island (Ulleungdo) sent Baek Gil and To Du to pay tribute (see here) . In the thirteenth year of Eui Jong (1159 A.D.), Simchalsa Kim Yu-rip and others returned (from the island) and said, “There was a big mountain in the middle of the island. The distance from its peak to the sea was more than 10,000 paces to the east, 13,000 paces to the west, 15,000 paces to the south, and 8,000 paces to the north. There were remains of seven villages on the island. There were also a stone Buddha, a bell, and a stone pagoda. A lot of dropwort, mugwort, and moorwort grow on the island.”

It is said that during the time of our (King) Taejo (1392 ~1398 A.D.), a great many of our wandering people ran away to the island. Samcheon resident Kim In-u was again ordered to be the anmusa and to forcefully evict the people there and to leave the land empty. In-u said, “The land is fertile. The bamboo are as big as columns, the rats as big as cats, and the peach seeds as big a doi. All of its products are like that.”

Notice that the record is describing Uljin-hyeon and its surroundings by using Uljin-hyeon as a reference point and then giving compass directions and distances to the surrounding villages, military camps, and local landmarks. It also refers to Usando and Muleungdo by giving their location as follows:

Two islands, Usan and Muleung, are due east of the hyeon in the middle of the sea. The distance between these two islands is not far, so they are visible on a clear, windy day. During the time of Silla they were called Usanguk or Ulleungdo. [It] has an area of 100 ri.

When referring to the locations of the other places around Uljin-hyeon, the record gave a direction and then the distance in ri, but in the case of Usando and Muleungdo, after it gave the compass direction, instead of giving the distance in ri, it gave it by saying that it was close enough to be seen on a clear, windy day.

When Koreans look at the above record, they say that the record was referring to the distance between the two islands, themselves, not to the distance between the two islands and Uljin-hyeon. However, if that were the case, then we would not know where the two islands were. We would only know that they are due east of Uljin-hyeon, but we would not know how far east. With the Korean interpretation, the two islands could have been on the other side of the Sea of Japan, which would not be very helpful to people reading the geography book. Besides, after giving the distance to Muleungdo and Usando, the record gave the size of only one island, which suggests that the two islands were close enough together to be considered as one. Remember, Dokdo is 92 kilometers southeast of Ulleungdo.

Not only does the Korean interpretation of the 1454 record not make sense in the context of the 1454 record, it does not make sense in the context of all the records up to that point. There has been nothing in any of the previous records that would suggest that either Muleungdo or Usando was a reference to present-day Dokdo. On the contrary, the records suggest that Muleungdo and Usando were neighboring islands close enough to each other to cause name confusion. The records tell us that both islands had plant life on them, which did not exist on Dokdo. Both islands have also been described using the dimensions of Ulleungdo, suggesting again that they were close enough to cause name confusion. The records also tell us that people lived on both Muleungdo and Usando, but Dokdo did not have the soil, water, or other resources needed to support a settlement.

If anyone still thinks that the Korean interpretation of the 1454 record is reasonable, then let’s put a stake in its heart by looking at the following 1531 record, Sinjeundonggukyeojiseungram, which says the following:

Usando – Ulleungdo (鬱陵島)

Also called Muleung (武陵) and U-leung (羽陵), these two islands are in the middle of the sea due east of the county. Three peaks shoot up to the sky. The southern peak is a little smaller. When it is windy and the weather is clear, the trees at the top of the peaks and the sand at their feet are clearly visible. With a good wind, you can travel there in two days. It is said that Usan and Ulleung were once one island with an area of 100 ri.

Notice that the above record says that on a clear, windy day the trees on the peaks and the sand at their feet can be clearly seen. This tells us that the record was not talking about Dokdo since Dokdo does not have any trees or sandy beaches. Notice also that the record says that you can travel to the islands in two days, which is how long it used to take to travel to Ulleungdo. To travel to Dokdo, it would have required three days travel time.

—————-

Finally, I would just like to remind people that Koreans back during the Joseon Dynasty did not have a Nikon camera with a zoom lens or a sign pointing in the direction of Dokdo. They also probably did not have the time and patience to sit on top of a mountain on Ulleungdo waiting to get a view of a ghost island that may appear only once in a blue moon.

Japanese Translation Provided by Kaneganese

(Gerryの投稿の日本語訳です)

下の写真は、“独島(Liancourt Rocks/竹島)”で、鬱陵島から2007年1月15日にニコンD200 70-300ED レンズを使用して撮影されたものということです。この写真では、鬱陵島南東92km沖にある独島の灯台まで写っています。仮に、江原道三陟市近くの二つの山のふもとを同じ日に撮影したとしましょう。どちらの山のふもとも鬱陵島から130~150km離れています。〈韓国語記事へのリンク〉

写真1

鬱陵島から独島を撮影することは、韓国では一大事です。と言うのも、韓国人はそのことが西暦512年から領土として認識していた事の証明になる、と思っているからです。世宗実録の記述を下に引用します。

“于山武陵二島 在縣正東海中 二島相去不遠 風日淸明 則可望見 新羅時 稱于山國 一云鬱陵島”

于山と武陵の2島は縣(=県 現在の蔚珍)の真東にあり、その間の距離は大変近く、晴れた日にはよく見える。新羅の時代に于山国もしくは鬱陵島と呼ばれた。

韓国の歴史学者はこの文が于山と武陵2島の間の距離を指すとし、日本の歴史学者は半島本土の蔚珍と2島の間の距離を指す、と主張します。以前、その理由をこのサイトに投稿しましたが、私は日本の学者の方が正しいと思うのです。

——————

韓国人は、なにをもって于山島が独島を示していると思うようになったのでしょう?彼らは次の1454年の「世宗実録 地理志」の記録が証拠だといいます。その記録は実際には、今の江原道の一地方にあたる蔚珍県を描写したものなのですが、韓国人は引用するとき、蔚珍県について書かれた部分をいつも省いて、記録のうちのほんの一、二行だけに焦点をおいて論じるのです。私は、こうした重要な一部の文章を理解するには、全体のコンテクストの中で読むことが重要だと思うので、記録の全文を投稿します。

“1454年 世宗実録「地理志」

“蔚珍県 県知事が一いる。 高句麗時代の元の名称は于珍也県で新羅時代に現在の名称に変わり、郡になった。高麗時代には蔚珍県と呼ばれており、現王朝期も同じ名称でまだ呼ばれている。県の住民は、過去には半伊郡もしくは仙槎郞と呼ばれた、と言っている。

藥師津は県南部にあり、骨長津は県北部にある。県境は、東は海岸までの8里、西は慶尙道安東任內小川県までの63里、南は平海までの37里、北は三陟までの32里である。270の池があり、人口は1430。軍隊は侍衛軍〈陸軍?〉が38人、水軍が70人、城の近衛軍が4人である。住民の名前は林、張、鄭、房、劉である。栄川から来た郷吏の閔と言う姓もある。土地の半分は肥沃であるが、残りは違う。漁労で生計を立てているが、皆とても武芸を崇敬している。1351結の土地を耕し、その3分の1は稲田である。その他、五穀, 桑、麻、柿、栗、梨、楮(こうぞ)などを生産している。貢物としては、蜂蜜、黃蠟、鐵、胡桃、石茸、五倍子、川椒、藿、漆、鹿脯、狐皮、狸皮、獐皮、虎皮、猪毛、大口魚、文魚、水魚、全鮑、紅蛤。薬草は、茯苓、當歸、前胡、白芨、五味子、人蔘がある。地場産物は61あり、篠竹、大きい竹と塩を含む。磁器の製作所が薪谷里の北方10里の所に、陶器の製作所は甘大里の北方12里の所にある。製品は余り質がよくない。皇山石城は周囲が徒歩616歩5尺で、時に村になっている。城内には泉が4つ、池が1つある。池は旱魃の厳しい時は干上がってしまうが、泉は決して涸れない。仇水亏勿山洞西部の興富駅北方44里のところに、温泉がある。駅は興富(古称は興府)・德神(古称は德新)・守山(古称は壽山)の3つである。狼煙を挙げる場所が4ヶ所あり、そのうち一つは平海沙冬山の南、竹津山の北の全反仁山にある。2つ目は竹津山で、竹邊串の北にある。3つ目は竹邊串で、亘出道山の北にある。最後は亘出道山で、三陟可谷山の北にある。

県の西部の沖に于山、武陵という2つの島がある。これらの島々(と)の距離はさほど遠くなく、晴天で風のある日にはよく見える。新羅の時代には、于山國あるいは鬱陵島と呼ばれた。面積は100里である。

大変険しい土地で、征服するのが難しいと思われたが、智證王十二年 (512 A.D.)に、異斯夫という者が何瑟羅州軍の長となり、こう言った。「于山人は無知で野蛮なので、武力で征服するのは困難である。そこで、知略を施さなければならない。」彼は恐ろしく獰猛そうな猛獣を木で作り、複数の軍の船に分載して島へ行き、住民へこう告げた。「もし服従しなければ、猛獣達を島へ放してお前達を食わせてしまうぞ。」島の住民は、恐れおののいて出てきて、服従した。

高麗太祖十三年(930 A.D.)に、その島の住民は白吉と土豆を使いにして貢納した。〈ここを参照〈リンク〉)毅宗十三年には、審察使の金柔立たちが(島から)帰還しこう述べた。「島の中央に大きな山がある。頂から海岸までの距離は、東へ1万歩、西へ1万3千歩、南へ1万5千歩、北へ8千歩である。島には7つの村の跡がある。石仏像、鉄鐘、石塔もある。柴胡、蒿本、石南草が沢山自生している。

我が太祖の時代(1392 ~1398 A.D.)に、多くの人が島へ逃げ込んだ、と伝えられる。三陟の住民である金麟雨が再び按撫使に任命されて島へ向かい、島の住民を強制的に退去させ、空島とした。金麟雨はこう報告している。「島の土地はとても肥沃で、竹は柱の如く太く、鼠は猫の如く大きい。桃の種は升のように大きい。その島の産物は、皆そんな具合である。」”

この記録が、蔚珍県を比較の対照点としてそこから各地方〈村、軍駐屯地、名所〉の方角や距離を表しながら、蔚珍県とその周囲の様子を描いていることにお気づきでしょうか。于山島と武陵島についても次のようにその位置が述べられています。

“県の西部の沖に于山、武陵という2つの島がある。これらの島々(と)の距離はさほど遠くなく、晴天で風のある日にはよく見える。新羅の時代には、于山國あるいは鬱陵島と呼ばれた。面積は100里である。”

韓国人が上掲の記録を見て、これは2島の間の距離を示していて、2島と蔚珍県の間の距離を示しているのではない、と言いますが、そう解釈した場合、この2島が何処にあるかが分からなくなってしまいます。蔚珍県の真東にあることだけは分かりますが、どのくらい東にあるのか、不明になってしまうのです。韓国側の解釈法では、日本海の反対側にあってもよいことにさえなってしまい、地理学的な本を読んでいるはずの読者に、甚だ分かりづらいものです。記録では、片方の島の大きさしか記載されておらず、そのことから、この2島が一つの島だと考えられるほど距離が近かった、と推測できるのです。思い出してください。“独島”は鬱陵島の東南92km沖にあるのですよ。

1454年の記録に関する韓国側の解釈が記録全体の文脈のなかで説明になっていないだけでなく、全記録〈実録〉の中でもおかしな文章なのです。これ以前の記録のなかで、武陵島もしくは于山島のどちらにしても独島である事を示唆するものは存在しません。それどころか記録では、むしろ武陵島と于山島は隣り合う島で、名称の混乱が起こるほど近かった、ということを示唆しているのです。記録では、どちらの島にも、植生があったことが分かりますが、独島には植物が自生していません。また、記録では、どちらの島にも、人が住んでいたことが分かりますが、独島には土や水、その他の人間の定着に必要な資源が無いのです。

もし、1454年の記録に関する韓国側の解釈が理解できる、と言う人がまだいるとすれば、次に揚げる1531年の新増東国興地勝覧の記録をぜひみて見ましょう。

“于山島-鬱陵島 武陵や羽陵とも呼ばれるこれらの2島は、県の真東の沖にある。三つの峰が空に向かってそびえている。最も南の峰は、少し小さい。風があり、天気のよい日は峰の頂上の木々や麓の渚の砂浜がはっきりと見える。風のよい日は2日で到達する。于山と鬱陵は昔は面積100里の一つの島であった、と言われている。”

上掲の記録で、「風があり、天気のよい日は峰の頂上の木々や麓の渚の砂浜がはっきりと見える。」とあることに気がつきましたか?このことから、この記録が独島のことを記述しているのでは無いことが分かります。独島には、木も砂浜もありませんから。2島に2日で到着する、と書かれていることにも注意して下さい。これは、この時代の鬱陵島への旅程と同じ日数です。独島へは、3日かかったはずです。

————–

最後に、(李朝)朝鮮時代には、ズームレンズ付きのニコンのカメラや、独島の方角を示す指標板など誰も持っていなかったことを思い出してください。それに、その時代の人々が鬱陵島の峰のてっぺんにじっと座って、存在するかどうかも分からないような幽霊島を撮影しようと待つだけの忍耐力があったとは到底思えません。

Posted by Gerry-Bevers, filed under Verus Historia. Date: January 18, 2007, 8:03 pm | 87 Comments »

Is the word “kyopo” offensive to Korean Americans along the lines that “nigger” is to the descendants of black slaves in America? That is what a Korean American commenter called H.Kim at the Marmots Hole is saying. It started here, and since it was hijacking the thread, Robert “the Marmot” Koehler made a new post to discuss the issue.

I post over at the Mamots Hole using the username ‘shakuhachi’.

So is “kyopo” the new “nigger”, or is this just race baiting? Go over there and discuss it!

UPDATE: There is a discussion about this over at the Asiapages. I left a comment there.

Posted by Matt, filed under Racist Industrial Complex, Scams. Date: January 17, 2007, 5:59 pm | 16 Comments »

Many Koreans and Korean-Americans are upset about a novel being used in some American schools entitled, “So Far from the Bamboo Grove,” which is based on the Japanese author’s own experience of fleeing across Korea to get back home to Japan at the end of World War II. In the novel the author apparently describes the violence, rape, and death she and her family saw along the way. Here is a December 31 article about the controversy from the Boston Globe: “School board to vote on Korea book.” Also, be sure to check out a very detailed post on the controversy over at “The Marmot’s Hole” here.

Koreans claim that the “novel” is an unfair depiction of Korea at the time, and so far there are ninety-three “customer rants reviews” at the Amazon Online Bookstore, most of which seem to be critical of the book. 

***UPDATE: I made a rash judgement on the customer reviews. The most recent reviews are almost all critical, but the older reviews speak highly of the book, most giving it a 5-star rating. It seems the recent controversy has caused some angry Koreans to visit the Amazon Web site. 

I have not read the book and do not really know what happened to Japanese families living in Korea at the end of World War II, but I can imagine that it must have been quite difficult for them to get back home to Japan after the war. I am interested in this period of history, so if anyone has any information on it, I would love to hear about it.

Also, the Chosun Ilbo claims here that the book has been banned in both Japan and China. Is that true? If it is, does anyone know why it was banned in Japan?

It seems that one of the reasons the book is receiving so much attention is that it tells a powerful and emotional story. Here are a couple of reviews of the book on Amazon:

From Publishers Weekly
This riveting novel, based on the author’s own experiences, describes a Japanese family forced to flee their home in Korea at the end of WW II. Ages 10-up.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal
Grade 6 Up A true account that is filled with violence and death, yet one that is ultimately a story of family love and life. Eleven-year-old Yoko Kawashima had led a peaceful and secure life as the daughter of a Japanese government official stationed in North Korea near the end of World War II. Abruptly, all is changed as she, her older sister Ko, and their mother flee the vengeance-seeking North Korean Communists and eventually make their way to an unwelcoming and war-ravaged Japan. Yoko’s story is spellbinding. She often escapes death by mere chance; her brother, Hideyo, separated from the family, has an equally harrowing escape. The longed-for arrival in Japan proves to be an almost greater trial, as their mother, defeated by the discovery that all their Japanese relatives are dead, dies. Together, Yoko and Ko create a home in which to await the return of Hideyo. Watkins writes clearly and movingly, with a straightforward style through which the story unfolds quickly. She skillfully alternates her account of the girls’ journey with that of their brother, maintaining readers’ interest in both. Watkins is able to describe scenes of death, rape, and other atrocities with a simple directness which has no trace of sensationalism yet in no way diminishes their horror. Readers will be riveted by the events of the escape and struggle for survival, and enriched and inspired by the personalities of the family. Especially well drawn is Yoko’s gradual emergence from a frightened, whining child to a strong and courageous young girl. Parallels can be drawn to Holocaust survival stories such as Aranka Siegal’s Upon the Head of the Goat (Farrar, 1981) and Esther Hautzig’s The Endless Steppe (Crowell, 1968). So Far from the Bamboo Grove should have a place among the finest of them. Louise L. Sherman, Anna C. Scott School, Leonia, N.J.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Posted by Gerry-Bevers, filed under Uncategorized. Date: January 17, 2007, 11:15 am | 145 Comments »

A commenter on www.facebook.com, Karen G. Lee has offered criticism of Occidentalism. I just want to show this without commenting to much. I want Occidentalism readers to give their opinions on this.

I am partly shocked, frustrated, and mostly saddened by this forum. And I am saying this as a person, and not as a Korean citizen and definitely NOT as a Korean nationalist. I know that there’s 2ch, a Japanese forum that openly attacks Korea and holds extreme anti-Korean comments, but wow, even in English sites! I didn’t know such thing existed; A site full of extreme cynicism and full of distort and devaluation about Korea.

What I found funny from this site is though, I wouldn’t mine if this site openly claims that it is an anti-Korean site; however, it continuously denies its role of degrading Korea. They always say “how is this site degrading Korea?” And they try to justify it. Funny, even non-Koreans found and noticed that one post after another held negative comments about Korea and offensive materials. It’s also funny that Koreans can’t really express their views openly because, one occasion, pro-Korean view was expressed, and that person was labeled as a troll, comments got deleted, and later got kicked out. So how is that a forum that opens up a diverse discussion? if pro-Korean ideas (and not even downright korean nationalistic view but mere facts and statistics),they say, “you must be a Korean liar, ultra-Korean nationalist”, or “I smell Kimuchi…”

And I found this even more scary, that these people have extensive data, which are very one-sided researched, got off from anti-Korean sites, or news about Korea that only shows very negative parts of Korea, or some are just downright stupid, downright subjective, and downright anti-korean (but ironically, they are never trolls, Nope Nope). For people new to Korea, it is possible that they might believe these threads and find them legitimate and true. Because believe it or not, they do present their discussions logically, but very anti-Korean and some very subjective. I am afraid that people who don’t know Korea will see Korea through these peoples’ one-sided comments.

Interestingly, they NEVER say they hate Korea outright. They all pose as nice and intelligent guys that are trying to show Other side of Korea and say they are trying to open up Koreans’ narrow minded views, Koreas are copy, dirty nation, degrade our historical heros(and these are the partly better comments by them), but underneath, they say all the offensive and negative comments they could think of! The cynicism is very much embedded. And it makes me truly disgusted. (by now I am definitely labeled as an ultra korean-nationalist! according to them! lol,,,)

Also, obviously these people have way too much interest in Korea, and they seem to know more Korean history than I do. (well, but sadly, only the very negative parts). I am not really sure what they are trying to promote… and trying to get out of through degrading and stepping on another person’s nation.

But, honestly, I never knew that Korea was this much hated and ridiculed. It really upsets me. Their comments really made me tear up and cry.

(And not only here, but also in youtube..have you noticed that anything, and i mean anything bad happens in Korea, it could be any country too, but these videos are posted in youtube like 5 mintues later with Japanese writings on it??? and they are probably not even Japanese, or perhaps they are,,,we can never know). Is Korea really that bad? Did we really do so much wrong to you people? Why do people work so hard making up anti-korean videos? why do they spend so much time spreading hate into this world? seriously I didn’t want to go this far, but these feelings have been accumulated over some times.

Well, please I really suggest people to check out this site! And judge for yourselves. And read their comments!

http://www.occidentalism.o

rg/

Thanks for the post about the Gerry B guy. < --- this man is a very active member in this forum.. the ELS english teacher that did not get his contract renewal due to dokdo issue. (he also write about very one-sided dokdo views extensivley).

Ironically, he kept (and this is his defense) saying in his posts that he loves Korean people, and Korea. But honestly, how can he say that when he spends hours and hours trying to disprove and break what every Korean holds so dearly? How can he say that when he spends hours and hours trying to break Korean image, distort Korean history by displaying only one extreme view? Why not at least present both korean and japanese sides? not just Japanese? he is a bigot and his motives are clearly designed to slander Korea... no??

Honestly, how is that loving Korea?

The only thing I will say is that people with opposing opinions do not get banned here, and she is sadly and unfortunately mistaken about that. I am posting here because I am unable to comment over there.

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Posted by Matt, filed under Rants. Date: January 17, 2007, 2:29 am | 39 Comments »

Joshua uses his extensive experience to analyse just why Korea and America cannot get along despite America bending over backwards to do so. A taster -

This year, courtesy of two American generals, we witnessed an interesting thought experiment. One of them, Garry Trexler, veered wildly off a long, patient diplomatic track intended to secure a new bombing range for his airplanes. Trexler issued an ultimatum: give me that bombing range in thirty days or the planes fly home. Trexler couldn’t have made that decision on his own, of course, but he was picked to be the face of the tougher U.S. position. Not only did this work, but it also drew an anomalous absence of overheated rhetoric from the Korean government. General B.B. Bell seemed to have internalized that by the time the South Koreans floated a trial balloon about delaying USFK’s move to Camp Humphreys (which I firmly believe is all about keeping U.S. troops as hostages to North Korean artillery, and not about money issues, as GI Korea has shown us).

Head over there and read it!

Posted by Matt, filed under diplomacy. Date: January 16, 2007, 5:22 pm | 1 Comment »

1894 Japanese Map of Korea (Ulleungdo & Usando)

The following is from an 1894 (27th year of Meiji) Japanese map of Joseon (Korea).

The map shows a line running from Uljin, on the Korean mainland, to Ulleungdo.

The writing next to the line reads: “Two Days from Uljin with a fair wind (自蔚珍得便風二日到).”

The above map shows Usando (于山島 – 우산도) off the east shore of Ulleungdo (鬱陵島 – 울릉도) in approximately the same location as present-day Jukdo, which is about 2.2 kilometers off Ulleungdo’s northeast shore.

Koreans claim that Usando was the old name for Dokdo (Liancourt Rocks – Takeshima), but the above map shows that Usando was not Dokdo. It was almost certainly Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo. If Usando were Dokdo, then a line should have been drawn from Ulleungdo to Usando showing that it would have required, at least, another day’s travel time to get there since Dokdo is ninety-two kilometers southeast of Ulleungdo. Since no such line was drawn on the map, that shows that Usando was just a neighboring island of Ulleungdo, not Dokdo. Besides, in 1894, Japan was referring to Dokdo as “Liancourt Rocks.”

Link to the 1894 Japanese map

Japanese translation provided by Kaneganese:

(以下は、Gerryの投稿に対する日本語訳です。)
1894年の日本による朝鮮の地図(鬱陵島)『明治二十七年 朝鮮全図』
以下は、1894年(明治27年)の日本製の朝鮮地図からの抜粋です。
 写真1
地図では、朝鮮半島本土の蔚珍から鬱陵島へ線が延びているのが確認出来ます。。
 写真2(写真1の拡大)
線のそばに書かれているのは、“風のよい日は2日で到着する”と言う文章です。
 写真3(写真2の拡大)
上掲の地図で、于山島が鬱陵島の東岸沖に描かれており、現在の竹嶼の位置(鬱陵島の北東約2.2km沖)とほぼ同じなのです。

韓国人は于山島が独島 (Liancourt Rocks – 竹島)の旧名だと主張しますが、上掲の地図は于山島が独島 では無いことを示しています。ほぼ確実に、鬱陵島に隣接する島、竹嶼であるといえるでしょう。もし于山島が独島であるならば、鬱陵島から于山島へも線が引かれていて然るべきです。なぜなら、 独島は鬱陵島の南東92kmにあり、さらに到着するのにもう一日かかるからです。そうした線が引かれていないことを考えると、やはり于山島は独島ではなく、単に、鬱陵島に隣接する島、竹嶼であるといえるでしょう。それに、1894年には、日本は独島のことを “Liancourt Rocks(りゃんこ島)”と呼んでいたのです。

Links to More Posts on Takeshima/Dokdo (With Japanese translations)

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 12

Posted by Gerry-Bevers, filed under Verus Historia. Date: January 14, 2007, 9:39 am | 215 Comments »

Unbelievable. The man you will see in these videos is called Taj El-Din Hilaly, and he is the leader of the majority of the Muslims community in Australia. Given everything that has been going on, one can hardly help but think his opinions reflect the opinion of Muslims in Australia.

Apparently he got his permanent residency (and then citizenship) through political pressure and activism by Muslims in Australia, and did not meet the normal requirements that apply to all other immigrants. If a political favor was granted, then it should be taken away. The whole of Australia should not suffer because a political party seeking short term political gain or votes wrongly and most corruptly granted him the right to stay in Australia permanently.

Posted by Matt, filed under finger chopping wacky, Racist Industrial Complex. Date: January 13, 2007, 9:02 pm | 24 Comments »

This is just a simple followup to my post here, concerning Lee Gyu-won’s 1882 map of Ulleungdo. Some of you may remember my saying that there was some writing I could not read on the map near Dohang (島項 – 도항), which was the old name for the present-day island of Gwaneumdo. I was curious about that writing because the first character in the writing was 石 (석), which means “rock.” I was curious about that because I thought it might have something to do with Seokdo (石島 – 석도), which was a neighboring island of Ulleungdo mentioned in a 1900 Korean Imperial Edict. Anyway, I finally found out what the writing said.

A few weeks ago I went to Gyujanggak at Seoul National University to look at the microfilm of Lee’s 1882 map. The mystery writing on the map was simply describing the red spot you can see on the map. Here is what was written:

石間朱穴(석간주혈)  : “Red Hole Between the Rocks”

Here is the relevant portion of the map and the printout of the microfilm:

 I think the red hole was also mentioned in Lee’s diary. He thought it was curious-looking for some reason. Anyway, that writing provides no clues to where Seokdo was. 

Also, the following is a printout of the section of the map that shows two caves. One is labeled 窟巖(굴암), which means “Cave Rock,” and the other is labeled 可支窟 (가지굴), which means “Seal Cave.”

The name “Seal Cave” suggests that sea lions once lived in this vicinity of the island. In fact, here is an excerpt from a 1786 Ulleungdo Inspection report that mentions “two caves” and “sea lions.” 

“We advanced to Gaji Beach (可支仇味) and found two caves in the side of the mountain. It was too difficult to calculate their depth. We surprised some sea lions that dashed out (of a cave). All our riflemen fired at once and got two of them before they could get into the water.”

Notice that the report mentions two caves, and that sea lions dashed out of one of them. It is very possible that the two caves mentioned in the report were the very same two caves that showed up on the above 1882 map. The report also mentions a place called Gaji Beach (可支仇味 -가지구미), which means “Seal Beach.” Though Lee’s map does not show a “Seal Beach,” it does show a beach between the two caves labeled “Satae Gumi (沙汰邱尾), which means “Landslide Beach.” It is possible that the name of the beach changed in the ninety-six years that separated the 1786 report and Lee’s 1882 map. Maybe there was a landslide during that time?

I mention the above because Koreans claim that one of the old names for present-day Dokdo (Takeshima – Liancourt Rocks) was Gajido (可支島 – 가지도), which means “Seal Island.” Koreans base their claim on the following 1794 Ulleungdo inspection report:

We slept there (Southeast Jeojeondong on Ulleungdo), and on the 26th, we changed direction (reversed course) and went to Gajido (可支島), where we surprised four or five sea lions that dashed out. They looked like water buffalo. Our riflemen all fired at once and got two of them. The geographical features of the beach landing (丘尾津) was the strangest thing. We went about ten ri into the valley, where we found the remains of what were clearly ancient dwellings. On both sides, the hills and ravines were so high and deep that they were difficult to climb up.

Notice that the above 1794 report says that inspectors went to Gajido (Seal Island), where sea lions “dashed out” of somewhere. Could that “somewhere” have been caves? Anyway, the Gajido in the above report could not have been “Dokdo” because it also says that they then walked ten ri into a valley. Ten ri equals four kilometers, but the two islands of Dokdo combined is only about 330 meters.

Gajido is also mentioned in the Mangiyoram under the description of Ulleungdo here.

The Munheonbigo (文獻備考) says,

Ulleungdo is due east of Uljin in the middle of the sea. It is near Japan’s Unshyu (隱州) and has three peaks that shoot up into the sky. The Southern peak is a little lower. On a clear day, the trees on the peaks and the sand at their feet are clearly visible. With a fair wind, the island can be reached in two days. The land area is about 100 ri. It produces dropwort (柴胡 – 시호), mugwort (藁本 - 고본), moorwort (石南 – 석남), wisteria (藤草 – 등초), and various junipers and reeds (蘆).  There are many large bamboos, and the fruit of the reeds and the large seeds of the peaches are big enough to make a winecup or a doi measure.

The wildcats are as big as dogs and the rats as big as cats. In the middle of the sea are big animals that look like cows with red eyes and no horns. They lie on the seashore in groups and can hurt a lone man, but they usually rush into the water when they see people. Called Gajido (可之島), the island was originally Usanguk (于山國). It was attacked and taken during Silla, but fearing Japanese plunderers, the people were evacuated to the mainland and the land was left empty. 

The above passage says that Gajido was originally Usanguk, which was Ulleungdo. Gajido was either another name for Ulleungdo, a place on Ulleungdo, or one of Ulleungdo’s neighboring islands or islets.

Koreans claim that Gajido was Dokdo, but their claim seems to be based solely on the fact that there were sea lions at Gajido and there were once sea lions on Dokdo. However, as the above passages clearly show, there were also sea lions on Ulleungdo. Gajido was not Dokdo. Here are links to other posts that talk about Gajido: Link 1 and Link 2.

Japanese translation provided by Kaneganese

これは、李奎遠の1882年の鬱陵島の地図に関してのポストへの追加です。覚えている方もいらっしゃると思いますが、現在の観音島の旧名である島項 ( Dohang- 도항)の近くにいくつか読めない文字があるとその中で言いました。石と言う文字で始まっていたので、1900年の大韓帝国勅令第41号の中にある鬱陵島の隣にある島として挙げられた、石島 ( Seokdo- 석도)に何か関係があるかと思い、とても興味深く思っていたのですが、それがようやく判明しました。

数週間前、ソウル大学のGyujanggak(ママ)に行き、奎遠の1882年の地図のマイクロフィルムを見てきました。不明だった文字は、単に地図上の赤い部分を説明しているだけでした。以下の通りです。

石間朱穴(석간주혈) : “岩と岩の間の赤い穴”

以下がマイクロフィルムの地図のプリントアウトのうちの関連する部分です。
 写真1
 写真2
 写真3
赤い穴に関しては李奎遠の日記に記述があったと思います。どういうわけか、彼は変わった形をしている、と思ったようです。とにかく、この文字からは、石島 ( Seokdo)が何処にあるのかに関するヒントは得られませんでした。

さらに、以下は二つの岩窟を示している地図のプリントアウト部分です。一つは窟巖(굴암)で洞窟岩の意味、, もう一つは可支窟 (가지굴)でアシカ(オットセイ・アザラシ)の洞窟という意味です。
 写真4
アシカ洞窟と言う名称から、アシカが島のこの場所に生息していたと考えられます。1786年の鬱陵島視察報告のうち“二つの洞窟”と“アシカ”に言及している部分が実際にあるので以下に載せます。

 “私達はGaji Beach (可支仇味)アシカ浜へ進み、二つの洞窟を山中に発見した。奥行きを測ることは困難だった。(洞窟から)アシカが飛び出てきたのでて驚いた。射撃手が全員同時に発砲し、海に逃げる前に うち2頭を捕獲することが出来た。”

報告の中で、2つの洞窟とアシカがそのうちの一つの中から飛出たとあることに注意して下さい。これらの2つの洞窟が、先に挙げた1882年の地図にある2つの洞窟と同じものである可能性は大変高いと思います。この報告はアシカ浜(可支仇味 -가지구미)と呼ばれる場所についてもふれています。李奎遠の地図には“アシカ浜”は記載されていませんが、二つの洞窟の間に“地すべり浜”(沙汰邱尾)があります。1786年の報告と李奎遠の1882年の地図の間には96年の開きがあり、その間に浜の名称が変化したことも有り得ます。ひょっとすると、その間に地すべりか山くずれがあったのでしょうか?

これらのことに言及したのは、韓国人が独島(Takeshima – Liancourt Rocks)の昔の名前の一つがアシカ島(可支島 – 가지도),である、と主張しているからです。韓国人は次に挙げる1794年の鬱陵島検察報告を基にそう主張します。

“私達はそこ(鬱陵島のJeojeondong南東)で一晩を過ごし、26日に向きを変えてアシカ島(可支島)へ行った。そこで4,5頭のアシカが飛出てきて驚いた。水牛のようだった。射撃手が全員同時に発砲し、海に逃げる前に うち2頭を捕獲することが出来た。射撃手が全員同時に発砲し、海に逃げる前に うち2頭を捕獲することが出来た。浜津(丘尾津) の地形は大変奇妙だ。十里ほど谷を進み、明らかに昔の住居跡と思われるものを見つけた。両側の丘と峡谷はとても高くかつ深く、登ることは困難であった。”

この1794年の報告では検察団はアシカ島へ行きアシカが何処からか“飛出てきた”とあることに注意して下さい。この“何処か”が洞窟である可能性はあるでしょうか?とにかく、この報告のアシカ島は“独島”であったはずが無いと思います。というのも、彼らはそれから十里ほど谷を歩いた、とも記述しているからです。十里は4キロメートルにあたりますが、独島は2島合わせても330メートルしかないからです。

アシカ島は文獻備考の鬱陵島の記述中にも出てきます。

“元鄭容によると、鬱陵島は蔚珍の真東にあり、日本の隠州に近く、3つの峰が空に向かってそびえている。もっとも南の峰は少し低い。晴れた日には峰の木々やふもとの砂がよく見える。風のある時はその島へは2日で到達できる。土地は百里ほどでセリ・ヨモギ・ヒメシャクナゲ・フジ、その他色々な種類のビャクシンやアシが生えている。大きな竹が多く、アシの実や大きな桃の種があり、盃や計量カップを作れるほどの大きさだ。
野生の猫は犬ほどの大きさがあり、鼠は猫ほどの大きさだった。海中には大きな牛(赤い目をして角が無かった)のような生き物がいた。群れを作って浜で横たわっており、人間が一人でいれば危害を加えることもありそうだったが、たいていは人間を見るなり海へ急いで飛び込んだ。アシカ島 (可之島)と呼ばれる島は、元は于山國であった。新羅の時代に攻撃されて略奪されたが、日本人の略奪を恐れて人々は本土へ避難し、島は空島になった。”
上記の記述に、アシカ島 (可之島)はもとは于山國つまり鬱陵島と書かれています。アシカ島は鬱陵島、もしくは鬱陵島のある場所、または鬱陵島の隣接する島々か島嶼のひとつのいずれかです。

韓国人はアシカ島(可支島)が独島であると主張しますが、その主張は単にアシかがアシカ島にも独島にも生息していたと言う事実にのみ拠っているようです。しかし、上記の記述で明らかなように、鬱陵島にもアシカは生息していました。アシカ島(可支島)は独島ではありませんでした。アシカ島(可支島)については他の投稿にも記述しました。

Links to More Posts on Takeshima/Dokdo (With Japanese translations)

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 12

Posted by Gerry-Bevers, filed under Verus Historia. Date: January 13, 2007, 8:23 am | 25 Comments »

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