Matt from Gusts Of Popular Feeling has found a Korean translation of the first Kenkanryu. Although I disagree with his analysis of Kenkanryu (he has not read it yet), kudos to him for finding something that I had been unable to find.

Since the author had declared in Kenkanryu 2 that a Korean version of Kenkanryu would probably be illegal in Korea based on legal advice given to publishers, I am going to take the liberty here of posting the Korean version of Kenkanryu. I do not believe this will result in a loss of revenue to the author, Sharin Yamamoto.

I post this with a caveat that I have no idea how accurate a translation this is to the original Japanese text, as I have not yet read it. This translation is a ‘fan translation’, not a professional one, so keep this in mind when you are reading it. On the other hand, these ‘fans’ seem to have put in a lot of effort to make the comic as visually close to the original as possible.

Right click and save to download a zip file of the fan translated Kenkanryu. Below is a few relevant pages from the translated Kenkanryu, which I think is pretty typical of the whole comic.

kenkanryu

kenkanryu

kenkanryu

kenkanryu

kenkanryu

Update: I have checked parts of the translation, and it seems to be pretty good. I would like to hear what Korean readers think of it, after they have actually read it all, that is.

Posted by Matt, filed under diplomacy, Verus Historia. Date: April 8, 2006, 4:02 am | 33 Comments »

33 Responses

  1. tman Says:

    Nevermind for a minute, these comic nonsense. Let’s learn what some of the foreigners in Korea thought of the Japanese in Korea.

    This was what Angus Hamilton wrote in his book.

    http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c387/Baesen/AngusHamilton/pg129.jpg

    This one’s even better

    http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c387/Baesen/AngusHamilton/pg130-131.jpg

  2. jaebea Says:

    I can’t wait to read this and get my Korean blood boiling.

    It’s still a bit chilly in Canada.

    :D

  3. ponta Says:

    Bruce Cumings also mention Hamiton.
    http://www.ciaonet.org/wps/cub01/

    I happened to find a few years ago in the library a book by an American named Angus Hamilton, who visited Korea in 1904. Korea, to him, was a land of exceptional beauty, and Seoul, a city much superior to Beijing. And I’m quoting him now, “The streets of Seoul are magnificent, spacious, clean, admirably made and well-drained. The narrow, dirty lanes have been widened, gutters have been covered, roadways broadened. Seoul is within measurable distance of becoming the highest, most interesting, and cleanest city in the East.” (Foreigners were always concerned about cleanliness in their various travels at the turn of the century.) There was, for Angus Hamilton, no question of the superiority of Korean living conditions, both urban and rural, to those of China, if not Japan. “Seoul,” he wrote, “was the first city in East Asia to have electricity, trolley cars, water, telephone, and telegraph systems all at the same time.” Most of these systems were installed and run by Americans. The Seoul Electric Light Company, the Seoul Electric Trolley Company, the Seoul Fresh Spring Water Company, were all American firms. At the turn of the century Korean imports from the U.S. included Standard Oil Company kerosene, Richmond Gem cigarettes, California fruit and wine, Eagle Brand milk, Armour canned meats, Crosse and Blackwell canned foods, and so on. Hamilton concluded that the period since the opening of the country in the 1870s had afforded Koreans countless opportunities to select for themselves such institutions as may be calculated to promote their own welfare. This is powerful evidence supporting the Korean claim that their route to modernity was not facilitated by Japan, but derailed and hijacked. Still, note the indexes that the American Hamilton chooses to highlight: electricity, telephones, trolleys, schools, consumption of American exports, and cleanliness. If we find that Japan brought similar facilities to Seoul and Taipei, do we place them on the ledger of colonialism or modernization? The Korean answer is colonialism; the Japanese and Taiwanese answer is modernization.

    Japanese Colonialism in Korea: A Comparative Perspective

  4. ponta Says:

    I found the following passage especially interesting.

    Most of these systems were installed and run by Americans.

    note the indexes that the American Hamilton chooses to highlight: electricity, telephones, trolleys, schools, consumption of American exports, and cleanliness. If we find that Japan brought similar facilities to Seoul and Taipei, do we place them on the ledger of colonialism or modernization? The Korean answer is colonialism; the Japanese and Taiwanese answer is modernization.

  5. Katz Says:

    We can’t understand Korean. Why did you post it in Korean.

  6. Matt Says:

    We can’t understand Korean. Why did you post it in Korean.

    I did not translate it – some fans translated it.

    Katz, you dont understand Korean?

  7. nou Says:

    A Korean reader responds to the comic strip.

    1. Why does the Korean expat look ugly with slit eyes and malnourished look? Isn’t it obvious that such depiction is purposeful when the character compares badly to his counterpart Japanese who have typical wet and round eyes of Japanese comic books? This depiction makes me doubtful on the objectiveness of the book.

    2. The book is saying Europe and Asia have different situation concerning the suffrage of longterm foreign residents. Asia is still under the Cold War etc…so Japan can’t allow suffrage for foreigners. South Korea is really the last place you can feel cold war but the government recently allowed voting right for municipal election for foreigners who have resided in Korea over 3 years.

    The possible overthrowing and disruption of municipal governments by segregated Koreans are hilarious. As far as I know, Koreans in Japan have kept low profile in politics. There was not notable or violent mass unrest by them, either.

    3. The book kindly explains that Koreans in Japan with South Korean nationality have suffrage neither in S.Korea nor in Japan. According to the book, the reason that Japan can’t give them voting right is they will have suffrage when they return to Korea!

    Will Japan accept if some Koreans leave for Korea to be elected as a representative there and suddenly return to Japan again? Surely, no. This means they can get suffrage in South Korea only when they decide to leave Japan permanently. It doesn’t make sense that Japan can’t give them voting right because they can be potentially eligible for suffrage in South Korea from where they can never return. Then no one will be eligible for suffrage in Japan, any Japanese can emigrate to foreign countries and obtain voting right there.

    I don’t have any opinion on the suffrage of Koreans in Japan. They didn’t opt for Japanese nationality and Japan may have reason not to give suffrage to non-Japanese. But some of the reasons mentioned in this book don’t make much sense.

    I don’t get why you are fond of Kenkaku and Hyomilryu. They don’t deserve much attention as attested by many. They are one of those books wanting to cash on social trend.

  8. Matt Says:

    I would prefer a comment after you have actually read it all, not just after reading the few pictures I posted of it.

  9. nou Says:

    It is possible sometimes that you can predict the whole content without reading it all. The pages you quoted from those two comic books make me sure that they are not worth of trouble of reading. If a couple of pages have full of ill organized thoughts, others may not be much different. If those pages had been striking enough to me, I would have begun to read it on my own.

    I don’t think any comic book can portray such sensitive issues. Comic books rely on images and they can’t contain much text. They are mainly for easy reading. If you want to warn dubious Korean Wave or evil Japan, you will need enough text explaining why.

    Most importantly other trustworthy people already told us that the books are not up to standard. Hyomilryu which is more horrible than Kenkaku was condemned by almost everybody. For Kenkaku, why would some major newspapers in Japan have refused advertising the comic book?

  10. Matt Says:

    It is possible sometimes that you can predict the whole content without reading it all. The pages you quoted from those two comic books make me sure that they are not worth of trouble of reading. If a couple of pages have full of ill organized thoughts, others may not be much different. If those pages had been striking enough to me, I would have begun to read it on my own.

    But you didnt even comprehend what was written in the pictures I posted.

  11. ponta Says:

    Nou

    . Why does the Korean expat look ugly with slit eyes and malnourished look? Isn’t it obvious that such depiction is purposeful when the character compares badly to his counterpart Japanese who have typical wet and round eyes of Japanese comic books?

    It is obvous that the author has some purpose to dwaw the character in such a way as you mentioned.We don’t need a theory about it. Cinderella is dipicted as beautiful, a witch as ugly. People love the former.The author probably intended that effect.
    But I pointed out before, the contrast is not between Japanese and Koreans, but rather between people who go with anti- Korean wave and people who go with pro-Korean wave.Look at the face of a Japanese who speak for Korea.
    And I am a bit surprised that Koreans speak up against this point when Koreans themselves had been dwawing a Japanese in more monstrous ways.Why is it that they did not speak up against the way the Korean cartoonist depict japanese?

    I don’t have any opinion on the suffrage of Koreans in Japan. They didn’t opt for Japanese nationality and Japan may have reason not to give suffrage to non-Japanese. But some of the reasons mentioned in this book don’t make much sense.

    Even an article by a scholar sometimes does not make sense.To me, the South Korean President’s policy toward Japan and North Korea does not make sense at all.History is important.Japan and South Korea disagree on how to interpret the history.But South Korea and North korean have no agreement on how to interpret histroy either.North Korean worships evil dictator. Plus, North Korean people are oppressed NOW.To me his reasoning has much more flaws that this author’s reasoning.

    And notice that there are a lot of Japanese readers who do not agree with this author.
    And it seem, as I mentioned somewhere, one of the author’s intention is to stimulate discussions between Korean and Japanese.In this sense he succeeded.

    I don’t get why you are fond of Kenkaku and Hyomilryu.

    In Japan, Kenkanryu got attention mainly because there were a big pro-Korean wave.
    I don’t get why some Korean are making fuss about it before they have read the book.

  12. nou Says:

    hi, ponta,

    i refuted the book in question only. you seem to say the author is nothing to some illogical Koreans. the fact doesn’t make his book recommendable.

    I don’t get why some Korean are making fuss about it before they have read the book.

    it’s not much different from the japanese who make fuss over anti-japanese slogans in korea and in china. the book’s title is ‘HATE for Korea wave’. As far as I know, “hate” is a very strong word. It is natural that Koreans get concerned. Wouldn’t it have been the purpose of the author making his book title as sensational as possible?

  13. dogbert Says:

    Nou, Koreans rely heavily on a certain comic book series by Won-bok Rhie to educate them on the cultures of other nations.

    http://book.naver.com/bookdb/book_detail.php?bid=167284

  14. nou Says:

    thank you, dogbert.

    you seem to know a lot about Korea. the series may be the most sold educational comic book in Korea.

    the difference between Rhie’s books and Kenkaku should be pointed out though. Rhie’s books are based on well established facts of European history such as Napoleonic War and Seven Years War. Rhie doesn’t deal with the truth behind Holocaust or eligibility of Turkey’s membership for European Union. In contrast Kenkaku is mainly about unsolved issues which will require proofs and explinations.

    There are many educational comic books but very few on complicated issues.

  15. ponta Says:

    Nou thanks.

    the fact doesn’t make his book recommendable.

    I have found some flaws in his argument.But that there are some flaws in the reasonsing does ont make the book unrecommendable either.I rather recommend Korean people to read the book if they want to keep making fuss about it.They don’t have to agree, they can criticize, but the comic presents an argument.You can discuss the points he made. After all the author says that is his intention.

    As far as I know, “hate” is a very strong word.

    “hate” might be a strong word, but I guess ”嫌”is not so strong a word to Japanese as some people might think.Some people say “hate” is the right word for “嫌”but I am not so sure. I don’t know how “hate” sounds to native English speakers, but as you know, the opposite of 嫌 is “like””好” and we have another word for “hate”,that is “憎” If you 憎 somebody, you 嫌 him.But that you 嫌 somebody does not mean you 憎 him. 嫌 sounds much weaker than 憎

    Wouldn’t it have been the purpose of the author making his book title as sensational as possible?

    That might be right. And one of the reason this book sold well is that fact that manistream newpaper rejected the advertisment.

    it’s not much different from the japanese who make fuss over anti-japanese slogans in korea and in china

    Okay,I got it. If some Koreans, like the blogger mentioned on this blog, can not ignore it, then I think the next logical step is to analyze it.To do so require to read it. To keep making fuss about it without reading it is just emotional response.I would like to know how rationally Koreans respond to the points the author made.Agan, they don’t have to agree with the author.but I want to see how they analyze the content of the book.
    (By the way, the part of Hyomilryu that Matt presented on this blog just gave me a good laugh.)

  16. nou Says:

    I rather recommend Korean people to read the book if they want to keep making fuss about it.

    I may need to define “the fuss” that you mention. The fuss is long over. There was a fuss for a week or so but not anymore when the book was released. It is no longer loudly talked about because it was not published yet in Korea.
    I don’t know what the Korean blogger in question was saying on the book. But you are right that the blogger should analyze it to keep talking.

    your explanation of kanji meaning is interesting. i guess such cultural closeness is the very reason that Korea and Japan should get along.

    嫌 in Korea is mainly for objects or groups of people. You can use the word to say “I hate snakes” or “I hate feminists”
    In other hands 憎 has more personal meaning. You can use the word to say “I hate the killer of my friend.” or “I hate my ex who betrayed me.”
    As you said 憎 has stronger meaning than 嫌 but it will be awkard to say 憎Korean Wave. 憎 is used when someone or something hurt you mentally or physically. I think 嫌 may be the strongest word for an object like Korean Wave.

  17. Matt Says:

    I think 嫌 may be the strongest word for an object like Korean Wave.

    Kenkanryu is not hating the Korean wave. Its a wave of hating Korea. The characters are formulated in this sense of order – 嫌韓 Hate Korea 流 1)style of, 2)method of, 3)manner of. The essence of the character is flow, circulate, drift, and rhetorically, a ‘wave’.

    Anyway, the reason you are still talking about this is that it is explained in the comic, and you have not read it. It is meaningless to discuss the comic with people that have read it when you only have your imagination to provide you with what you think it contains.

  18. dogbert Says:

    I would not equate Rhie’s comic books to “Kenkanryu”, but having read some of them, I do strongly maintain that they are a poor substitute for more substantive works, as Rhie serves up and/or reinforces primarily unhelpful and inaccurate generalizations and stereotypes of various cultures and peoples, including Korean.

  19. ponta Says:

    Nou Thanks

    your explanation of kanji meaning is interesting. i guess such cultural closeness is the very reason that Korea and Japan should get along.

    Yes,I agree.And I find many similarlity between the two.I guess that is the one reason we also have conflicts.But I think we can do well if we act in a rational way.

    I think 嫌 may be the strongest word for an object like Korean Wave.

    I am not sure how it is used in Korea. but “嫌” is the most genreral but the weakest word for the negative attitude toward person,things, event in Japanese.I am not sure you have these words;嫌、嫌悪、憎、忌・・・・”but 嫌”is the weakest among these words which show the negative attitude toward things.And if you are talking about the awkwardness,嫌韓 kenkan is a coined word in the first place. So the kenkan sounds awkward anyway. The author could have used 憎韓、忌韓、instead, he used 嫌韓.That goes to show it is not the strongest word for Korean wave.

    (By the way , I think Matt has put up this post because someone post the link to the blogger who discusses kenkanryu a few days ago—I lost the link)

  20. Errol Says:

    nou Says:

    April 9th, 2006 at 10:53 am 3. The book kindly explains that Koreans in Japan with South Korean nationality have suffrage neither in S.Korea nor in Japan. According to the book, the reason that Japan can’t give them voting right is they will have suffrage when they return to Korea!

    Australian citizens who have resided outside of Australia for more than siz years lose the right to vote. They could, theoretically (excluding dual citizens), give up their citizenship to vote in their temporary residence, however, very few Australians (except Rupert Murdoch) would want to give up their citizenship. eg Nicole Kidman who was born in Hawaii still retains Australian citizenship.

    nou, what would you suggest that South Koreans should do if dual citizenship is illegal in Korea and Japan?

  21. nou Says:

    Update: I have checked parts of the translation, and it seems to be pretty good. I would like to hear what Korean readers think of it, after they have actually read it all, that is.

    OK. I didn’t read your instruction carefully. I thought that you wanted opinion on the page that you presented. I’m not that interested in the whole book, so I will shut myself up. (I will rather read Kim Wan Sup’s book if I have time.)

    nou, what would you suggest that South Koreans should do if dual citizenship is illegal in Korea and Japan?

    I couldn’t understand your question well, Errol. Do you mean what South Koreans living in Japan should do? Dual citizenship is illegal so they maintain only one citizenship: Korean or Japanese. I guess it depends on their individual decision. (Or did you mean what S.Korean government should do for Zainich Koreans in Japan?)

  22. Katz Says:

    Matt, are you sejong from crisscroos.jp/forum?

  23. Matt Says:

    Matt, are you sejong from crisscroos.jp/forum?

    No, I dont even read that forum.

  24. Ell Says:

    I think these pages are a good representation of Kenkanryuu.
    It’s definitely more logical than Hyomilryu and it is dealing with
    a real life problem.

    2. The book is saying Europe and Asia have different situation concerning the suffrage of longterm foreign residents. Asia is still under the Cold War etc…so Japan can’t allow suffrage for foreigners. South Korea is really the last place you can feel cold war but the government recently allowed voting right for municipal election for foreigners who have resided in Korea over 3 years.

    The cold war thing is talking about the cold war between China-Korea-North Korea vs Japan. The anti-Japanese community against Japan. It’s definitely not warm :)

    Korea giving suffrage to foreigners means a whole different thing than Japan giving suffrage to foreigners. There are 530,000 Koreans (non-naturalized) in Japan, while there are only about 300 Japanese in Korea. The weight of the vote is totally different.
    Add to that, according to Japanese Immigration Dept, there were 43,151 illegal overstays by Koreans during the year of 2005.
    This is the number that the dept was able to verify, so in reality
    there are bound to be higher number.
    And to top it all off, Korea has anti-Japanese policy.
    It would be suicide for Japan to give suffrage to a citizen of such a country.

    Korea giving suffrage to foreigners is fine. That’s her policy.
    Don’t try to think it’s the correct thing to do and force it on Japan.
    I don’t see the U.S. giving votes to foreigners.

    The possible overthrowing and disruption of municipal governments by segregated Koreans are hilarious. As far as I know, Koreans in Japan have kept low profile in politics. There was not notable or violent mass unrest by them, either.

    I’m sorry but you don’t know the situation in Japan.
    The Koreans can use second names, so they can pass off as Japanese in most situations.
    The Mindan and Souren, the Korean patriot organization, have been active in bullying policies favorable to the Zainichi (permanent residents in Japan). And there is now proof that the Mindan and Souren members have aided in the abduction of Japanese by North Korea.

    3. The book kindly explains that Koreans in Japan with South Korean nationality have suffrage neither in S.Korea nor in Japan. According to the book, the reason that Japan can’t give them voting right is they will have suffrage when they return to Korea!

    Yes. Or rather, I ask you. Why can’T the Zainichi have voting rights for S.Korea? Japanese living outside of Japan can vote at their respective embassy. You should criticize your government for not allowing your countrymen, whereever they live, to vote.
    If the Zainichi can participate in the Korean politics, I’m sure they would be satisfied with that and not try to gain voting rights in Japan while being a foreigner. If the Zainichi wants to vote in Japan, they need only to naturalize.

    Will Japan accept if some Koreans leave for Korea to be elected as a representative there and suddenly return to Japan again? Surely, no.

    Ahm… any proof? As the book says, there are N.Korean congressmen living in Japan right now. Japan, stupidly, already accpets what you think Japan will not. I agree with you. Japan shouldn’t accpet them.

    It doesn’t make sense that Japan can’t give them voting right because they can be potentially eligible for suffrage in South Korea from where they can never return. Then no one will be eligible for suffrage in Japan, any Japanese can emigrate to foreign countries and obtain voting right there.

    You’re not making sense here. Japanese have suffrage in Japan.
    That is Japanese policy. Foreigners currently do not have voting rights. Period.
    This is the same in other countries such as U.S.

    Whether a country gives a voting rights to foreigner or not is dependent on that country, and there is no right or wrong.
    And the “vote trade” with Korea is not fair from the standpoints of Japan as you can see in the number.

  25. nou Says:

    Whether a country gives a voting rights to foreigner or not is dependent on that country, and there is no right or wrong.

    I don’t see the U.S. giving votes to foreigners.

    you contradict yourself here. if it is independent decision of each individual country, why do you cite US example while trashing away Korean decision of giving suffrage to foreigners? is the US the role model of Japan? (Maybe yes.)

    i don’t think your refutal deserves another refutal. it is full of illogical thought as shown above. (Do you even think there exists things like “vote trade”? you should write a theory about it.)

    it is assuring that japan also has her share of irrationality. i was despaired seeing illogical koreans all over the internent.

  26. Ell Says:

    Ah, nou is a typical Korean I see.

    you contradict yourself here. if it is independent decision of each individual country, why do you cite US example while trashing away Korean decision of giving suffrage to foreigners? is the US the role model of Japan? (Maybe yes.)

    I see that you lack intelligence to think.
    You are the one who introduced Korea as an example for giving suffrage to foreigners and I gave U.S. as an example of a country which do not. My stand point is that which is correct policy is that country’s independent decision.
    And it is Japan’s decision to not give suffrage to foreingers.

    And what part of my post was “trashing away Korean decision of giving suffrage to foreigners”? I said it’s a fine decision, but that’s just Korea’s decision. Where are you reading? In your mind?
    Whew!

    i don’t think your refutal deserves another refutal.

    You can’t refute it because there is nothing illogical about what I have written. Try to refute it.
    Try to explain to me your illogical statements I have pointed out in the previous post.

    it is full of illogical thought as shown above. (Do you even think there exists things like “vote trade”? you should write a theory about it.)

    What a laugh. You can’t even understand concept examples.

    it is assuring that japan also has her share of irrationality. i was despaired seeing illogical koreans all over the internent.

    Don’t worry. You’re being a fine example yourself.

  27. nou Says:

    ell, think whatever you want to believe. i don’t want to make a footnote for every sentence of your reply.

    bye

  28. Ell Says:

    That’s fine, nou. It’s just as I expected you’d respond since you didn’t even try to refute my main point in the first post.

    If all you could say is “think what you want”, then you shouldn even reply to my original post in the first place.

    - Why do Korean government not allow Zainichi voting rights in Korea while they are generously giving foreigners voting rights in Korea?
    - How many foreigners are eligible to vote in Korea, and for that matter, what kind of voting can they take part? Eeverything that a Korean can?

    That is the question you should be asking yourself before you trash talk about Japanese voting system.

  29. empraptor Says:

    I think these pages are a good representation of Kenkanryuu.
    It’s definitely more logical than Hyomilryu and it is dealing with
    a real life problem.

    Ell deserves a prize. She can state the obvious.

    Ah, nou is a typical Korean I see.

    I see that you lack intelligence to think.

    This sounds like you guys are having a lot of fun. Pity I already have my hands full with the other thread.

    Did nou pick a wrong fight? Did he throw the towel in? Will he be back? Stay tuned!

    I’ll have to actually read this thread now. Darn it all.

  30. Ell Says:

    Did nou pick a wrong fight? Did he throw the towel in? Will he be back? Stay tuned!

    Well,if he’s coming back, he needs to overcome his tendency to try to end arguments with “you’re illogical but I won’t prove why you’re illogical” stance. I think I saw him do that before. It’s an easy way out.

    At least for this arguments, he needs to make clear where he stands. Does he think giving foreigners voting rights is the absolute correct thing to do? Is Korea the standard that should be followed?
    If so, then why aren’t other countries, like U.S., not following suite?
    If not, then what is he complaining about?

  31. kojibomb Says:

    ponta,

    note the indexes that the American Hamilton chooses to highlight: electricity, telephones, trolleys, schools, consumption of American exports, and cleanliness. If we find that Japan brought similar facilities to Seoul and Taipei, do we place them on the ledger of colonialism or modernization? The Korean answer is colonialism; the Japanese and Taiwanese answer is modernization.

    For both Korea and Taiwan, the answer is colonialism. The difference is Taiwanese appreciates the modernization and Koreans don’t. This does not mean all Taiwanese thanks Japan. They are more like 50 50… some likes Japan others don’t like Japan…
    In Korea, similar case 50 50 but… some just hate everything about Japan, and others like the current Japan but hate what japan did to Korea during WWII.

    I think… def colonialism. Although Korea became modernized, think about human rights problems. Did Japan had right to colonize Korea and Taiwan and gain full control over them? no… I guess that’s why some Koreans hate Japan

  32. Two Cents Says:

    Kojibomb,
    Yes, we shouldn’t have had to fight two wars for Korea; One to free them from their former oppressor, and another to defend its territory from the northern invaders, then pump in money to modernize it as a fortress against Russia. Wait a minute, that sound too similar to what the US did for South Korea, doesn’t it? I must be wrong then.

  33. Follow up on Gerry’s Japan focus post · Occidentalism Says:

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