24  Jan
Hentai!

A Japanese student got busted in Melbourne doing peep photography, so called ‘up-skirt’ shots.

A Japanese student who took photographs underneath a woman’s skirt at the Australian Tennis Open earlier this week was today jailed for six months.

Takuya Muto, 34, also secretly filmed up to five females as they showered at a backpackers’ hostel on Tuesday.

Melbourne magistrate Peter Couzens ordered that Muto serve a minimum of two months’ jail and suspended the balance of the sentence for two years.

The court heard that police who arrested Muto found he had taken pictures of a female tennis player his lawyer described as “legitimate, tourist-style” photographs.

Muto, of Sydney, pleaded guilty to charges of stalking, unlawfully using a camera and offensive behaviour.

Sergeant Mark Galliott, prosecuting, said Muto took photographs and filmed with a video camera as he walked around the tennis centre.

Sergeant Galliott said some of Muto’s photographs were of the thigh and buttocks areas of female patrons and of one who wore a dress.

He positioned the camera under the woman’s skirt and took a photograph between her legs, obtaining a picture of her genital area.

When he returned later to his room at the All Nations Backpackers’ hostel, Muto took the video camera and filmed between four and five women as they showered in an adjoining unisex cubicle.

Sergeant Galliott said Muto obtained “graphic, naked footage” of the women, including one who ran screaming from the shower when she saw the camera pointed at her.

He was arrested soon after and appeared today in court with the help of a Japanese interpreter.

His lawyer, Natalie Sheridan-Smith, said Muto, who wept and trembled during the hearing, had expressed genuine remorse for his conduct.

Ms Natalie-Smith said a friend of Muto lent him the video camera, which he was told had a special feature that allowed him to secretly film people.

Muto, who is studying for a masters of business administration at a NSW university, was humiliated, embarrassed and deeply remorseful, she said.

I am surprised that he even got caught. People in Australia are not usually alert to this kind of thing.

Posted by Matt, filed under Random. Date: January 24, 2007, 10:22 pm | 20 Comments »

20 Responses

  1. smackout Says:

    I heard about this on the news the other day, I have to say im not suprised he is Japanese.

  2. Darin Says:

    He probably was trembling because unlike Japan, in Australia this type of thing doesn’t get let go just by simply paying a fine. It’s really a no brainer, you don’t do this type of stuff. I don’t think he feels remorseful, but the humiliation and embarrassment are definitely part of his current emotional spectrum.

    I’d say deport him, but then that’s just one more sick-o that’s gotta be dealt with in Japan.

  3. tomato Says:

    This is definitely a disease widespread in Japan. Maybe in the US of A he can be acquitted for lacking legal sanity as I heard this kind of defense holds out in shop-lifters there?

  4. stumpjumper Says:

    Yes, we export everything from a pencil to a hentai.

    BTW, I am glad that he did not physically hurt anybody,
    and I hope the victims are happy with the verdict.

  5. Kaneganese Says:

    I am so sorry for the victims. I do hope she will recover from psychological damages soon and doesn’t suffer from PTSD in her life.
    I’m really frustrated that Japanese legal system is too lenient to those kind of crime. This is a crime!! I hope Australian legal authority put him in jail as long as it can or just leave him in the outback desert with videocam before deporting to Japan.

  6. Two Cents Says:

    Darin,

    He probably was trembling because unlike Japan, in Australia this type of thing doesn’t get let go just by simply paying a fine.

    In that case, I hope the Australian court system deals with him on their own terms instead of deporting him back to Japan where he will not get what he deserves.

  7. crypticlife Says:

    This site’s so racist against the Japanese :D

    Actually, tomato, in most places in the US it ISN’T a crime unless under particular circumstances. There are some politicians/legislators who are trying to make it one, though. Even then, I think it would likely be a misdemeanor, nothing more.

    Kaneganese, I think you’re exaggerating a tad when you mention PTSD. C’mon, it’s a picture of her privates, nothing more. Sure, it’s an invasion, but it’s not that traumatic. It’s maybe somewhat embarrassing, but people show their privates to physicians regularly. PTSD is more like being in wars, having your friends die in front of you, that sort of thing — not minor embarrassment at having photos taken of you. You want him put in jail for how long? Or left to die? If you’re serious, you have no idea what real evil is.

    “Muto, who is studying for a masters of business administration at a NSW university”

    Not-Safe-for-Work University? ;)

  8. ponta Says:

    Japanese are wired, aren’t they?……Hang them with Women’s Panties!!!

    (Korean people, I am joking….however poor it might be,… okay?)

  9. Aki Says:

    LOL. History of panty peeping culture in Japan.

  10. Lyrt Says:

    WaiWai is as good as VANK when it comes to colourful inventions and unbridled imagination.

  11. polysics Says:

    i find this post very offensive. shame on you matt. no nippon poontang for u tonight.

  12. dogbert Says:

    Why hasn’t “wjk” commented on this thread?

  13. Kaneganese Says:

    crypticlife,

    Yes, I was joking about leaving him in a desert. And I realized it was a bad joke.

    But about PTSD, how do you know that those girls did not take this seriously and they want to even die? They are not AV actresses nor prostitutes. It totally depend on how the victim take this even it was not physical attack, not you. Besides, there are so many illegal DVDs of those kind of videos taken with hidden cameras. It is very possible that you could be victimized secondary or forever if it goes on internet. It is not just a ” minor embarrassment ” at all. It is a more offensive than you think. In this case, he was caught before those things happen, but still, it is very offensive for you to say it is just a minor thing to all women.

    All I want to say is social atmosphere in Japan are too lenient. If it was in Japan, and first crime, it would not be even in news. He would be just released. I think I should put those culprit in jail at least 3 month. By the way, the morning news in Japan said he is over 30. Is this his first crime? I doubt it.

  14. randomcow Says:

    I always though Japan was much stricter than just a fine. Your company gets contacted, you lose your job, probably your wife too (she can’t stand the looks she gets from the other women in town every time she goes shopping. She knows that they are thinking that perhaps she is responsible in some way, perhaps she couldn’t satisfy you sexually, etc).

    Japan deals with things like this in its own way.

    RC

  15. crypticlife Says:

    Kaneganese,

    Suppose this story had been about someone who, instead, was going around slapping people in the face. Would you express concern over cracked neck vertebrae? It could happen, but it’s pretty unlikely. Same here.

    Here’s a quote from the National Institute of Mental Health on PTSD:
    “Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops after a terrifying ordeal that involved physical harm or the threat of physical harm. The person who develops PTSD may have been the one who was harmed, the harm may have happened to a loved one, or the person may have witnessed a harmful event that happened to loved ones or strangers. ”

    You diminish the seriousness of the disorder when you say a photo will cause this. If they want to die, they have other psychological problems that existed prior to this event. You say it offends you (actually, you say “it is offensive”) for me to say it’s a minor thing. But you want to equate the effects with war, rape, and murder — I’d say that might offend victims of those sorts of experiences.

    The “trauma” here is discovering someone spying on you, not pictures afterwards (subsequent posting of pictures indeed would be continued victimization (no indication he was actually doing that, though), but it would not cause PTSD.). Suppose he hadn’t had a camera, and had just walked in? Shocking, yes. Traumatic, in the “I’m going to have nightmares about this for the rest of my life” way? Tell me, have you ever had someone open the bathroom door while you were in it? That’s about the level of shame this is.

    Also, not to be confrontational, why are you being sexist? Wouldn’t the embarrassment also potentially apply to men in the situation?

    As I mentioned, in the US upskirting isn’t even a crime. Going after anyone requires different charges, if they apply. If they don’t, they’d be released in the US also.

    Still, you could be right about the social atmosphere in Japan. I really don’t know, and this doesn’t give a lot of indication (since it’s Australia). I’m kind of curious how you know first offenders are just released in Japan if it doesn’t make news. I also really wouldn’t want you on a jury if you’d assume that his age suggests whether it’s his first crime. That’s simply not rational.

    I tend to agree with randomcow that for most in Japan, they have other circumstances which would punish offenders pretty severely. The ones to be concerned about are those without those circumstances like a normal job, wife, family, etc.

  16. Matt Says:

    On a similar subject, has anyone seen それでもボクはやってない yet?

  17. stumpjumper Says:

    Hi, Kaneganese
    I don’t mean to pick on you, but you said

    But about PTSD, how do you know that those girls did not take this seriously and they want to even die? They are not AV actresses nor prostitutes.

    Did you know most of people in those professions are sexually
    abused when they were kids. I believe they are the ones that
    suffering from the traumas.

    Reading your post gave me the impression that they don’t care about
    anything, so…

  18. Kaneganese Says:

    crypticlife,

    I am going out, but I try to respond more precisely if you want to hear from me more when I come back.

    Actually, I have studied Clinical Psychology almost 20 years ago, but my knowledge are rusty. That doesn’t make me a expertise on this issue, so I will check the current situation of psychotherapeutic diagnosis in Japan before I respond.
    And if you are interested in Japanese legal system, I have a lawyer in my family member, so I also check the person about the legal situation in Japan too. I hope he/she doesn’t charge me.
    Is that OK with you?

    And I am not trying to make a gender issue or women VS men out of this. Even if the offender were woman, which unfortunately happens a lot in Japan, I still say same thing. It is a crime. I don’t fully understand the nuiance or meaning of sexiest, but I do think men and women are different in a lot of way, but in many ways, they are totally equal. I hope it can be an answer to your opinion.

    And your analogy is not good. Because slapping people in the face itself is crime in Japan. And it is possible to cause fatal damages to your head. Of course it depends on the situation, how hard it was, etc…

    stumpjumper,

    Thank you for commenting on my opinion.
    Yes, I do know significant persentage of those professional workers in sex industry hold abused history and I can imagine they are suffering from traumas and I honestly think if that was the case, I feel sorry for them. And if they have the symptoms that fits the category of PTSD from DSM, ICD,or the any other criteria of scientific societies which his/her therapist belong to, the person could be diagnosed as PTSD.
    Please understand that I was not try to insult those people by saying that.

    Matt,

    I haven’t seen the movie though I like his movie, but I think the main theme of the movie is false charge of molestation. The molestation is definitely illegal in Japan, but as for “盗撮(secret recording? I don’t know the English word for this)” the only law which can prevent those crime is “プライバシー保護法(privacy protection act)”. The action itself is not illegal in Japan too. That means if the victim was not aware of what was going on, you cannot even charge the offender. At least this is how I understand.

  19. Jiromaru Says:

    randomcow Said:
    January 25, 2007 at 6:14 pm

    I always though Japan was much stricter than just a fine. Your company gets contacted, you lose your job, probably your wife too (she can’t stand the looks she gets from the other women in town every time she goes shopping. She knows that they are thinking that perhaps she is responsible in some way, perhaps she couldn’t satisfy you sexually, etc).
    Japan deals with things like this in its own way.

    RC

    I agree with randomcow. I think Kazuhide Uegusa, a leading and brilliant young economist and an ex professor of Waseda University, has ruined his and his family’s life twice by his own conducts.

    http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%A4%8D%E8%8D%89%E4%B8%80%E7%A7%80

  20. stumpjumper Says:

    Hi, Kaneganese

    Please understand that I was not try to insult those people by saying that.

    Thank you for the replay. I just wanted to make sure.
    Thanks again.