The following video shows a Korean teacher hitting his students with a Kendo bamboo stick. Kendo is the Japanese martial art of fencing. When practicing Kendo, people wear protective gear that covers the upper body, including the face and head, but the students being punished here have no such protection. 

The students were beaten for missing a makeup class. (See HERE.) A representative of the school said the school was sorry about the incident. The representative also said a personnel meeting was held, and the teacher who beat the students was given a warning and was forced to apoligize to the students he beat and to the rest of the class.

A warning and apology? I say give the two students the cane and let them beat him for a while, and then the school should fire his sadistic ass.

Video of Teacher Caning Students

Posted by Gerry-Bevers, filed under Uncategorized. Date: November 1, 2007, 5:49 pm | 49 Comments »

49 Responses

  1. egg Says:

    Hope it doesn`t happen again. The teacher seems to be furious but is missing a class that bad?

  2. GarlicBreath Says:

    Its common in *Corean schools for teachers to beat students. In the west such actions would land the teacher in the gray bar hotel. When confronted with rampant child abuse in schools, most coreans simply blame this as on Japan, and then resume the beating. I do think beating children is barbaric. I know I am running a risk of being called a racist for saying that beating children is barbaric. Jenny or anybody, if you think this corean cultural practice is the mark of a civil society, I would love to hear your opinion. (pleae be polite and do not write in all caps)

    .
    .
    .
    .

    *not every single corean does this, and not in every single school-jenny.

  3. General Tiger Says:

    GarlicBreath:

    most coreans simply blame this as on Japan,

    Excuse me, what? Care to explain?

  4. kjeff Says:

    He seriously has an anger management issue, can his ass! Personally, there’s nothing wrong with mild and ‘deliberate’ corporal punishment for boys, but the teacher, shown in the video, clearly was out of control.
    .
    Having ‘tasted’ both, getting hit with a shinai is not nearly as painful with a rattan cane; somehow rattan comes to mind when thinking of “caning.” Shinai is not even as painful as my mom’s plastic cloth hanger. 12 years of Catholic school, 6 of them boys only, you get to sample different materials. Steel ruler on bare flesh…ouch…it hurts just thinking about it.
    P.S. I actually preferred 10 strikes of anything than let’s say, 10 laps frog jumping around the soccer field.

  5. justice Says:

    Let me make it very clear to you Garlic Breath. I, nor Jenny, or anyone else is excusing this behavior or any other found on this site. However what you fail to realize is that that there is good and bad aspects of any society on culture. In America they have the “right to bear arms” resulting in thousands of deaths every year, here is Australia we lock children in refugee camps…but do i condemn Australia as a nation and culture because of this, or do you? no. we do not. When it comes to corea however you focus only on the negetive aspects and furthermore you generalize them of representing the entire nation. This is racism, or at the least, discrimination based on ethnicity.
    I do feel as if i’m repeating myself, but i’m yet to hear you comment on these points.

  6. General Tiger Says:

    Justice, Jenny, just ignore Garlic if you can’t stand him.

  7. Errol Says:

    justice Says:
    November 1st, 2007 at 9:12 pm

    here in Australia we lock children in refugee camps…but do i condemn Australia as a nation and culture because of this, or do you? no. we do not.

    I do. It is my duty as an Australian to do so.
    .
    I’m considering starting a Non-Australians Anonymous Club. The N.A.A.
    .
    The 12 steps of Non-Australians Anonymous begin with an admission of a problem with the truth. This step is extremely important because it means that the Non-Australian has come out of denial enough to admit that denying the truth is causing problems in Australia. N.A.A. does not scold or look down upon people who are unable to admit or find the truth, but suggest that the Non-Australian continues to try the 12 steps.

  8. alec931 Says:

    gorlicbreath,
    *sigh* you get more retarded with each post. I mean, before you used to at least try to sound logical. Now you just spout off some random BS and can’t even respond to those who see through your retarded posts……poor poor gorl. I guess that’s what years of neglect and isolation have done to you. :(

  9. justice Says:

    Errol you are infuriating….
    Do you honestly think i meant i do not condemn those activities as an Australian? Of course i condemn the incarceration of innocent children. What i was saying is i do not take this as representative of the entire Australian culture. Similarly to how i do not take this teachers actions as representative of Corean culture. Because that would be discrimination and racism.

  10. GarlicBreath Says:

    Let me make it very clear to you Garlic Breath. I, nor Jenny, or anyone else is excusing this behavior or any other found on this site.

    Not true, justice. When you make a tu quoque arguement, you are making an excuse. An example of a tu quoque excuse follow:

    However what you fail to realize is that that there is good and bad aspects of any society on culture. In America they have the “right to bear arms” resulting in thousands of deaths every year, here is Australia we lock children in refugee camps…

    You are pointing out that other do it too or others are worse.

    but do i condemn Australia as a nation and culture because of this, or do you? no. we do not.

    I can condem them if I want to. I condemn america for having troops in Corea. Watch me condemn them.

    When it comes to corea however you focus only on the negetive aspects

    I am stating facts. What do you want? Go here and tell the world you love Corea.

    and furthermore you generalize them of representing the entire nation. This is racism, or at the least, discrimination based on ethnicity

    .
    Actually I have’t.

    I do feel as if i’m repeating myself, but i’m yet to hear you comment on these points.

    I have answered your questions. Somehow, I doubt you will be happy.

  11. Errol Says:

    justice Says:
    November 1st, 2007 at 10:35 pm

    What i was saying is i do not take this as representative of the entire Australian culture.

    But it is representative of Australian culture. John Howard was elected by a majority of Australian voters. It’s a sad thing to say but many Australians care more about their hip pocket nervethan a fair and just society.
    .
    In fact, this money obsession is what makes Australia congenial to many holiday oppas who have similar values.

  12. justice Says:

    “Not true, justice. When you make a tu quoque arguement, you are making an excuse. An example of a tu quoque excuse follow:…You are pointing out that other do it too or others are worse.”
    .
    No Garlicbreath i am not pointing out that these things happen elsewhere in order to excuse them, i’ll say it right here and right now; child abuse is wrong. This teachers actions are inexcusable. -I am making this point (again) to illustrate how there is good and bad in every nation, every culture and everything. Do you disagree? But these evil actions by individuals are NOT representative of the general population, you use this information to generalize like that, and that IS RACISM.
    .
    “I can condem them if I want to. I condemn america for having troops in Corea. Watch me condemn them.” -If you bothered to read my post directly above yours you would see i have already adressed this issue and again you miss the point. I DO condemn these actions, i DO NOT condemn the entire culture.
    .
    “I am stating facts. What do you want?” Yes but you are very selective about those aren’t you. For example here’s some headlines that just happened to be currently in the Corean news;
    “Koreas move toward permanent peace”
    “Foreign exchange students from around the world proudly display their countries’ national foods at an event for “Ajou International Day,”
    “Hangeul to help ethnic minorities preserve culture”
    “Korean researchers discover highly effective diabetes treatment”
    And this is only from the generally negetively skewed media. But you don’t focus on these positives do you. “Facts” they may be, but negetively biased? Definitely.
    .
    “Actually I have’t.” oh really?
    “COREANS do take great offence when anybody challenges THEIR chauvinistic and corea-centric view of the world”

  13. justice Says:

    Errol, since when does “the majority of voters” constitute Australian culture?
    Also i’d like to note it’s interesting that when you say “It’s a sad thing to say but MANY Australians care more about their hip pocket nervethan a fair and just society.” you say “many,” therefore avoiding generalization, yet when talking about similar issues regarding corea you find it perfectly ok to generalize “Two types of Koreans leave Korea. Group 1: those who wish to learn from Western countries, or Japan or wherever and; Group 2: those who stay in closeted communities where they can bully and ostracise (wanggta) anyone who doesn’t submit to oppa’s demands.”

  14. Errol Says:

    justice Says:
    November 1st, 2007 at 11:48 pm

    “Two types of Koreans leave Korea. Group 1: those who wish to learn from Western countries, or Japan or wherever and; Group 2: those who stay in closeted communities where they can bully and ostracise (wanggta) anyone who doesn’t submit to oppa’s demands.”

    If you belong to a group other than Group 1 or Group 2 please enlighten me as to its unique attributes.

  15. GarlicBreath Says:

    But you don’t focus on these positives do you.

    So… you want me to focus on the positive things. Otherwise I am racist. LOL.

    Here is what you called “news”.

    Hangeul to help ethnic minorities preserve culture

    If you want to read chauvanistic propaganda, that is up to you. I read that article and found it full of errors, lies and half truths. For example this was a lie:

    Koreans under Japanese colonial rule were forbidden to use the Korean language.

    The donga was founded in 1920
    .
    I think its higly arrogant to think that corean will be of any use to some small tribes.

    here is another lie.

    The ease of Hangeul is a major reason why Korea has the world’s lowest illiteracy rate.

    What a load of crap.

    This article is chauvinistic, and I try and point out the lies and counter with the truth.

    Linguists around the world have also praised Hangeul

    This one made me laugh. Notice he names none. Coreans love to say that hangul is the most.. best.. greatest.. first.. lol

  16. kjeff Says:

    Errol,
    For someone who linked(in contrast to ‘read’) a lot of academic texts, you sound extremely shallow,

    If you belong to a group other than Group 1 or Group 2 please enlighten me as to its unique attributes.

    Better economic opportunities, find Korea creatively restrictive, dislike the strict social hierarchy among many others. I know several Koreans who came to the States because they couldn’t stand their family.

  17. General Tiger Says:

    GarlicBreath:

    The donga was founded in 1920

    You’re not completely wrong, but it’s sort of hard to say that the Japanese had the “cultural rule” on a benevolent basis.

    What a load of crap.

    97.90%? Just who did they use as the sample? I wouldn’t say Korea has the lowest, but I don’t feel the statistics is accurate (100% literacy in a large place like Norway? Does that even make sense?)

  18. justice Says:

    “So… you want me to focus on the positive things. Otherwise I am racist. LOL.”
    .
    That is not what i suggested, by all means if you want to focus on the negetive aspects of a culture go ahead, just don’t try to pass these negatively biased “facts” off as the ultimate authoritative definition of Corean culture, and expect that these define Coreans in general. THAT is racism.
    .
    Also i’d like to make it clear that you have admitted with the above statement that you are only interested in the negative aspects of the culture. That being the case, who are you to try and define Corea and Coreans when you are only interested in one side of the argument? (and before you say it i don’t believe myself to be in a position to do so either).

  19. GarlicBreath Says:

    Also i’d like to make it clear that you have admitted with the above statement that you are only interested in the negative aspects of the culture

    .

    I never said that. I am just trying to understand what you want from me. You gave a pile of biased articles the stink of corean chauvinism and corean propaganda. (I have proven that with one article) And you said that I should make similar comments.

    That being the case, who are you to try and define Corea and Coreans when you are only interested in one side of the argument?

    Only one sice? Do you say that to nationalist like Tigg who only see one sided greatness of corea? Funny thing is that I am interested in countering that one sided view, (when its wrong) put forth by nationalists like you.

    (and before you say it i don’t believe myself to be in a position to do so either).

    We agree on that, but I wasn’t going to say that. I don’t have any objection to free speech. I guess free speech stops when a person questions the greatness of corea, or tells the truth about corea.

  20. GarlicBreath Says:

    Tigg the article stated:

    Koreans under Japanese colonial rule were forbidden to use the Korean language.

    I was just pointing out that Korean language was used. In fact it was promoted in the beginning as a way to ween corean off the cultural hegemonic tit of china.

    97.90%? Just who did they use as the sample? I wouldn’t say Korea has the lowest, but I don’t feel the statistics is accurate

    The article that justice reccomened did.

    Korea has the world’s lowest illiteracy rate.

  21. justice Says:

    “I never said that. I am just trying to understand what you want from me. You gave a pile of biased articles the stink of corean chauvinism and corean propaganda. (I have proven that with one article) And you said that I should make similar comments.”
    .
    I never said you should make similar comments, and I’m not here to debate the credibility of the articles. Here’s one from the abc to avoid bias…”South Korea has announced a more than $AU300 million emergency aid package for flood-hit North Korea.” The point i was trying to make with these (and this is by no means limited to media) is that you are selective and negatively biased in collecting your so called “facts” to back up your argument. More so the media, which in any country is predominantly negative, isn’t even a good example. I don’t want you to make “similar comments,” i simply don’t feel you have any right to condemn the Corean culture at all, let alone based on your negetively biased “facts.”
    .
    “Only one sice? Do you say that to nationalist like Tigg who only see one sided greatness of corea? Funny thing is that I am interested in countering that one sided view, (when its wrong) put forth by nationalists like you.”
    Again, i am not a nationalist (i’m not even korean) and i’m surely not one sided as i do not excuse such activities as child abuse in Corea, i just simply don’t think it’s fair to use that to label the entire culture “backwards and underdeveloped.”
    .
    “I guess free speech stops when a person questions the greatness of corea, or tells the truth about corea.” I have no problem with free speech whatsoever, i have a problem with racism and discrimination.

  22. General Tiger Says:

    GarlicBreath:

    I was just pointing out that Korean language was used. In fact it was promoted in the beginning as a way to ween corean off the cultural hegemonic tit of china.

    Or rather, wasn’t it a form of pampering before commiting cultural genocide?

    The article that justice reccomened did.

    I’m questioning the accuracy of the statistics itself, since it seems biased towards the Western social democracies.

  23. GarlicBreath Says:

    I’m questioning the accuracy of the statistics itself, since it seems biased towards the Western social democracies.

    source was the 2007 CIA factbook.

    We know the CIA factbook is full of inacurate information. Just look:

    A picture of the Dokdo islets taken from a Korean Navy P-3C maritime patrol aircraft

    The CIA World Factbook, a website maintained by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, lists the Korean-administered Dokdo Islets as disputed territory.

    How dare the CIA factbook claim that takeshima (dokdo) is disputed. And everybody (at least if you are a corean nationalist) knows that Takeshima(dokdo) is corean.

  24. GarlicBreath Says:

    i simply don’t feel you have any right to condemn the Corean culture at all, let alone based on your negetively biased “facts.”

    LOL, you are nuts.

  25. General Tiger Says:

    GarlicBreath

    How dare the CIA factbook claim that takeshima (dokdo) is disputed.

    Then I guess you have to say “How dare most of the world claim Dokdo is disputed.”
    .
    Stop denying reality.

  26. GarlicBreath Says:

    Stop denying reality.

    What?

  27. justice Says:

    “LOL, you are nuts.” This suggests nothing except that you cannot refute my argument.

  28. crypticlife Says:

    GeneralTiger,

    “(100% literacy in a large place like Norway? Does that even make sense?) ”

    General Tiger,

    Don’t question statistics on gut feeling. Norway has one of the best educational systems in Europe. I believe it’s also near the top in international mathematics rankings.

  29. crypticlife Says:

    Incidentally, paddling in school is legal in almost half the US states, and actually occurs in at least three.

  30. HanComplex Says:

    This must be the same news I just read.

    A video clip of a high school teacher beating two students with a bamboo sword has caused a stir among netizens.

    In the 38-second video clip, a teacher is seen striking the hips of two students in a push-up position with the sword. When one student stands up, unable to endure the beating, the teacher follows him to strike his back.
    http://english.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200711/200711010024.html

    Just what is it with Koreans and Korean culture that make them go hwa-byung easily? Instead of sorting things out peacefully like most civilized and advanced cultures they tend to resort to emotional responses with yelling or violence. This was also on the news recently about a student’s grandmother(!).

    A student’s grandmother battered a teacher as stunned students watched at an elementary school in Seoul last week.

    According to the Seoul Office of Education on Tuesday, the third grade teacher, identified as Bae, was attacked while teaching class at a school in Songpa district in eastern Seoul on Thursday.

    The parents and maternal grandmother of a student identified as Kim barged into the classroom while Bae was teaching and began a loud quarrel about whether the teacher has discriminated against Kim.

    During the argument, the grandmother began pulling the teacher’s hair and the quarrel turned into a scuffle. Alarmed students notified other teachers who subdued the attacker. Bae was taken to a nearby hospital and discharged a week later.
    http://english.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200711/200711010022.html

  31. General Tiger Says:

    crypticlife:

    Don’t question statistics on gut feeling. Norway has one of the best educational systems in Europe. I believe it’s also near the top in international mathematics rankings.

    I don’t question things on feelings, I question it under logic. It’s impossible for any decently sized country to have a 100%.
    .
    Garlic:

    What?

    That most of the world believe Dokdo is disputed. regardless of who has the right to it.

  32. Errol Says:

    Mr kjeff, you’re a mine of self-revelation.

    # kjeff Says:
    November 2nd, 2007 at 12:22 am

    (Reasons for leaving Korea)

    1/ Better economic opportunities,

    2/ Korea creatively restrictive,

    3/ dislike the strict social hierarchy

    4/ Several Koreans came to the States because they couldn’t stand their family.

    These admissions tell us so much about yourself. They also don’t produce exceptions to the general categories of Groups 1 and 2 under which all 4 of your observations fit.
    .
    Let’s go through them one by one.
    .
    1/ Better economic opportunities. The Korean economy is dominated by selfish members of Group 2 who lock out competitors.
    .
    2/ Korea creatively restrictive. Those who wish to learn in foreign countries and participate in freedom of expression. i.e. Members of Group 1.
    .
    3/ dislike the strict social hierarchy. Freedom from being bullied and ostracised. Members of Group 1 trying to escape from members of Group 2. Often failing to escape, as Holiday Oppa keeps them away from non-Koreans.
    .
    4/ Several Koreans came to the States because they couldn’t stand their family. By several you mean yourself? Left a comfortable life in Jakarta Selatan as your playboy past had caught up with yourself and the Indonesian-Chinese girls had begun to shun you. Hanging out at Blok M in your beemer with your dodgy mates your (Chinese) father (Wijaya-Hartono-Susanto Clan) was becoming increasingly exasperated. Your (Korean) mother suggested a sojourn in Oregon or Washington State. Lots of “nice” Korean girls there. You met some dodgy room salon PIMPSvalets evading military service and enjoyed the services of young women in Seoul paid for by your room salon PIMPvalet friends. After all unlike the foreigners in Korea (or Japan) your soft requests were easily met in the room salons of Korea. Lest you be as described by James at Japan Probe: Comment by James (admin)
    2006-09-14 18:14:35

    Joel:

    Clearly “let me put my baseball-bat-sized foreign penis inside you” is the most common hard request the foreigners make of the hookers.

    .
    Eventually, your father said, “Enough is enough Kjeff! I’m cutting off your allowance!” You then left for the USA. Which translates as not that they (the emigres such as yourself) couldn’t stand their family but that their family couldn’t stand them. Oh! The mortification your devout Christian father feels whenever he is reminded of your cavorting in room salons with your PIMPvalet mates.

  33. GarlicBreath Says:

    Just what is it with Koreans and Korean culture that make them go hwa-byung easily?

    Good question.
    .
    After watching the videos I think the most likely the students deserve the beating. Corean teachers realize that normal punisment with their students doesn’t work. Nobody know that better then Coreans, espcially teachers. coreans (not all) do understand force much better then reason.

    .

    In general, this level of beating is the same as child abuse, and that is why more enlightened nations such a severe beating would land the teacher in jail.

  34. kjeff Says:

    Errol,

    These admissions tell us so much about yourself. They also don’t produce exceptions to the general categories of Groups 1 and 2 under which all 4 of your observations fit.

    Reeks of desperation…sorta feel sorry. Didn’t you learn as a toddler, the square one goes to the empty square and the triangular one goes to the empty triangle? Got splinters?
    .

    Left a comfortable life in Jakarta Selatan as your playboy past…

    Must have touched a nerve, and starting to resort to personal attacks. Actually I came to the States pretty young, just right after high school. Didn’t have much chance to be a playboy since I’d gone to an all-male school.
    .
    P.S. “Beemer” wasn’t really cool back home(still isn’t); it’s a bitch to get spare parts.
    .
    Oh…oh…oh…as the Koreans say, “You need some more of your mom’s milk.”

  35. GarlicBreath Says:

    Corea is not alone.

  36. Phil2Musashi Says:

    Wow GarlicBreath, you mean other countries use corporal punishment as well? You are so smart, logical and insightful.
    .
    But I don’t even think corporal punishment is that big an issue. It is used widely all over the world, and is not going to stop anytime soon. The big issue is the severity of the beatings, and the intent of the individual dispensing abuse.
    .
    There is a big difference between a caning as punishment, versus a caning from a pissed of teacher who loses his mind with anger. When anger and violence are together, nobody can learn from each other.

  37. Errol Says:

    I apologise for my naivete Mr kjeff. I was unaware that the conspicuous consumption at Blok M is not concordant with the Principles of Humility as espoused at the Mother Teresa School for Indonesian-Chinese Boys.

    kjeff Says:
    November 2nd, 2007 at 9:42 pm

    starting to resort to personal attacks. Actually I came to the States pretty young, just right after high school. Didn’t have much chance to be a playboy since I’d gone to an all-male school.

    Mr kjeff, you are also a mix of the naive and the worldly.

    “Beemer” wasn’t really cool back home(still isn’t); it’s a bitch to get spare parts.

    Worldly knowledge of motor vehicles but what naively happened in Washington State or was it Oregon? You failed to mention this observation in your retort.

    Errol Says:
    November 2nd, 2007 at 8:32 pm

    Your (Korean) mother suggested a sojourn in Oregon or Washington State. Lots of “nice” Korean girls there.

    Let me relate another anecdote.
    .
    Me: Moi.
    .
    J: Young Indonesian Chinese friend.
    .
    K: Korean wife of Young and Wealthy Indonesian Chinese friend.
    .
    [Scene: J and I had just finished a contract in Korea and were celebrating in a fancy restaurant.]
    .
    Moi: Why don’t you invite K?
    .
    J: She’s at home watching TV with her mom.
    .
    Moi: Does she ever do anything but watch Korean dramas?
    .
    J: No.
    .
    Moi: Doesn’t K have a business degree from the University of Washington?
    .
    J: Yes.
    .
    Moi: But she’s never used it?
    .
    J: No.
    .
    Moi: Then why did she go to the states?
    .
    J: To find me.

  38. kjeff Says:

    Errol,

    Worldly knowledge of motor vehicles but what naively happened in Washington State or was it Oregon? You failed to mention this observation in your retort.

    What the hell…I have no clue what you’re talking about. What’s the deal with Washington and Oregon? What’s with the wife in the anecdote(I’m not even sure if that’s qualify as one)? What’s your point? Really, crawl, then walk, then run… Stick with what you know. Have you ever been to Indonesia?

    I apologise for my naivete Mr kjeff. I was unaware that the conspicuous consumption at Blok M is not concordant with the Principles of Humility as espoused at the Mother Teresa School for Indonesian-Chinese Boys.

    What’s with Block M? And, where is this Mother Teresa School? BTW, the term is Chinese-Indonesian. As far as I know, there’s only one St. Theresa school in Jakarta. I used to go to their Sunday mass. It had been an all-female school, but became a co-ed later on. And I think, there are only two all-male schools in Jakarta, one is mine, the other is Gonzaga(it may have gone co-ed). Errol, are you on drug?

  39. empraptor Says:

    Please ignore GarlicBreath. Or if you cannot refrain from feeding the troll, try requesting that he be banned.

  40. Errol Says:

    # kjeff Says:
    November 4th, 2007 at 8:14 am

    What’s your point?

    You’re the Korean sociology and FDI and room salon expert.

    # Errol Says:
    November 3rd, 2007 at 7:44 pm

    Moi: Then why did she go to the states?
    .
    J: To find me.

    Romantic or pragmatic?

  41. Errol Says:

    kjeff Says:
    November 4th, 2007 at 8:14 am

    And, where is this Mother Teresa School?

    Of which you are a famous graduate?
    .
    Mother Teresa and God
    .
    Mother Teresa died and went to heaven. God greeted her at the Pearly Gates. “Be thou hungry, Mother Teresa?” asked God.
    .
    “I could eat,” Mother Teresa replied.
    .
    So God opened a can of tuna and reached for a chunk of rye bread and they began to share it. While eating this humble meal, Mother Teresa looked down into Hell and saw the inhabitants devouring huge steaks, lobsters, pheasants, and pastries. Curious, but deeply trusting, she remained quiet.
    .
    The next day God again invited her to join him for a meal. Again, it was tuna and rye bread. Once again, Mother Teresa could see the denizens of Hell enjoying lamb, turkey, venison, and delicious desserts. Still she said nothing.
    .
    The following day, mealtime arrived and another can of tuna was opened. She couldn’t contain herself any longer. Meekly, she asked, “God, I am grateful to be in heaven with you as a reward for the pious, obedient life I led. But here in heaven all I get to eat is tuna and a piece of rye bread and in the Other Place they eat like emperors and kings! I just don’t understand it…”
    .
    God sighed. “Let’s be honest Teresa,”
    He said, “. . . for just two people, it doesn’t pay to cook.”

  42. Brian Says:

    Yes yes once again, a site of Hypocrites. What is not ok in some cultures, may be in others? Anyone understand that simple concept? It seems that people here think their own values apply to the whole world. How egotistical. I bet you that there are things about Japanese culture or Australian culture that other’s find discusting. And yet, you guys have the audacity to sit here and critisize one so candidly. lol.

    PS: Garlic-face, you’re a retard. Just wanted to be one more person to say that. lol. No I’m not joking. I hope you continue to live your sad and hateful existence. Oh and all the other racists on here are too.

  43. egg Says:

    I guess each cultures have different values in some degree. But at the same time, I believe there are values which have universal validity. Losing ones temper and torturing his student is against the later. This kind of things sometimes happen in my country too but I think it a shame and should be criticized. I feel considering that the teacher`s act is following Korean cultural value will be an insult against Korea.

  44. kjeff Says:

    Errol,
    What? Did you miss your Haldol?

  45. Errol Says:

    Enough with the Mr kjeff!
    .
    It’s Saint kjeff of the Room Salon from now on. :)

  46. chase Says:

    You guys might want to look at this…

    http://bbs1.agora.media.daum.net/gaia/do/debate/read?bbsId=D102&articleId=50696

    I personally think corporal punishment should eventually diminish. Sadly, in korean school system right now, some degree of corporal punishment is indispensable. There are no detentions or point deducting from your grade for behaving badly/not doing work and many teachers are not that great enough to get respects from students (or students can be pretty rude too). In my experience, at least 70% of teachers were either reluctant to hit students or didn’t put personal feelings to it. But there were some teachers who really used their power to insult students. (ex slapping one’s cheek) although i have to agree that, that student was really really rude…

  47. GarlicBreath Says:

    Hi Chase, thanks for the link.

    I personally think corporal punishment should eventually diminish.

    What needs to happen for it to diminish? (It sounds like you don’t want it to end but just diminish)

    Sadly, in korean school system right now, some degree of corporal punishment is indispensable. There are no detentions or point deducting from your grade for behaving badly/not doing work

    I have heard from many many coreans that corean schools are higly competitive (its prolly propaganda), but don’t teachers give bad marks for not doing their work? As far as detentions? Why not just start handing out detentions and end the abuse of children.

    and many teachers are not that great enough to get respects from students (or students can be pretty rude too).

    So, some bad teachers and bad students are the reason why teachers abuse their students.

    In my experience, at least 70% of teachers were either reluctant to hit students or didn’t put personal feelings to it.

    Does that mean that 70% don’t beat children.

    But there were some teachers who really used their power to insult students. (ex slapping one’s cheek

    That is abuse and not insults.

    although i have to agree that, that student was really really rude…

    I am not clear, I hear from coreans many many times that corean people are very respectful of teachers and their elders. Is this wrong?

  48. Schizodoxe | le blog des mutations : sciences, technologie, robotique, culture, video, news, infos, analyses... Says:

    [...] Source : Occidentalism. [...]

  49. vsh Says:

    Punishment is necessary to bring the kids up right.
    What the teacher was doing was dangerous as he might have hurt the eyes, nose, etc but a more planned out punishment (using the cane/stick on the backside) would have been perfectly appropriate.
    I was brought up strictly and I have a integrity and sense of honor and duty that I rarely find nowadays.
    My kids will be beaten of they deserve it. If they are samrt, tehy will not do anything to deserve it.