A group of Korean ex-servicemen are in Tsushima right now protesting against Japan and demanding that Japan recognise Dokdo as Korean territory, and also to withdraw from Tsushima.

According to the article, at 10:20 am the group of 21 Koreans started protesting in front of the Tsushima town hall, with a banner saying “Dokdo is Korean territory, Taema is also Korean territory” (Taema is the Korean name for Tsushima – the natives call it Tsushima). Some of the protesters bit their fingers to the extent that they were able to pour enough blood on a Korean flag to write “Takeshima is our land” in Hangul.

There were some Japanese counter protesters there with a Japanese flag, and in objecting to the Korean protest some yelled “Koreans are mistaken”, “Tsushima is Japanese territory”, and “Go home!”.

A local worker watching the events commented that he could not understand why the Koreans were protesting in Tsushima, and if they want to object they should go to the national parliament. The mayor said that “It is impossible that Tsushima could be Korean territory. I want them to “withdraw” their incorrect historical awareness. Takeshima is a national problem, and we can’t deal with it in this city. I hope for the development of a future oriented and friendly Japan-Korean interchange”.

If and when there are photos of this, I will post them. Protesting about Takeshima is one thing, but fancy insisting to Japanese locals that their land belongs to Korea. Quite a nerve.

Update: Here are some pictures from here and here.

tsushima protest

tsushima protest

Posted by Matt, filed under diplomacy, finger chopping wacky, Uncategorized. Date: July 22, 2008, 10:35 pm | 18 Comments »

18 Responses

  1. Well, I’ve Heard Tsushima Is Pretty This Time of Year… | The Marmot's Hole Says:

    [...] (HT to Occidentalism) [...]

  2. koreakp Says:

    The Japanese Right Wing Nationalist love distort history from the truth. Every year they change Japanese history for the worse. What is Japanese so afraid?? ( Korea connection). Japanese or Japanese Right Wing nationalist cannot change or distort history without Koreans or Korean peninsula Japan would have not exist. Japanese Right Wing Nationalist can distort history but you cannot change ” Geographical Cultural Location”. Yes, Dokdo and Daemado did belonged to Koreans.

  3. GarlicBreath Says:

    Just as I thought that wacky wacked-out nutty Koreans could not get anymore right wing then the last wacky thing they did…. Korean wack-jobs do it again.

    Way to go Korea. Oh and Koreakp proves my point that even middle of the road Koreans are nationalists in any other country. Wacky… wacky wacky… lol

  4. wiesunja Says:

    The reason why Korea refuses to take their case to the ICJ is that Koreans are incapable of, let alone willing to try, understanding the concept of third party arbitration as a means of law enforcement.

    Just look at how Korean society views the concepts of “law” or “standardized ethical code”. In Korea, respect for the concept of “law and ethics” is basically non-existent. I mean, look at how success in politics, business, education, or sports is obtained in Korea…through bribery, cheating, lying, or plagiarism. The examples are just too many to name

    -Former President Kim Dae Jung buying his way to the Nobel Peace Prize by collaborating with Hyundai to siphon money off to appease Kim Jong Il’s greedy little hands.
    - Dr. Hwang Woo Suk faking his research and results just to be able to take the shortcut to finally being able to provide Korea with recognition for scientific achievement on the global stage. What’s sicker is that even after he was exposed as a fraud, Korean nationalism and racism among its citizens continued to force its citizens to deny any ethical breach by Hwang and instead, they tried to blame a foreigner (American).
    - 2002 World Cup, but more so the 1988 Olympic Boxing incident with Roy Jones. Enough said..that was about the most shameful thing I have ever seen in sports. And even when the Koreans were caught red-handed, they refused to admit they were wrong and instead blamed NBC for exposing the dirty bribery scandal.
    - The tons of university students in Korean universities (I know as I taught in Korean universities for many years) who are so used to being allowed to cheat that they even had the gall to complain to me that I would not tolerate cheating on tests. Can you imagine that?
    - Azia Kim, a Korean-American granted but still having to bear the brunt of the traditions of her parents, faking her way for an entire year as a student at Stanford when she wasn’t even enrolled.
    - “Chongi” (bribery money) from parents of children to their teachers as a perfectly accepted custom.

    The list goes on..

    So you can see why Koreans are so paranoid and have these conspiracy theories that settling this dispute about Dokdo in court would be meaningless or detrimental to the Korean side. The reason? Because, the Koreans are projecting their own ideas and cultural views of the law onto the international scene. Since the law is a complete joke and because judicial process/review amounts to jack squat in Korea, Koreans think that the same holds true in the international courts of justice and law in other countries. Koreans live in a society in which they see the law being a totally useless means for awarding justice and achievement. Koreans grow up seeing that in their society, the one who achieves justice or gets what he/she wants is not the person who obeys the law..it’s the person who screams the loudest or has the most money. That’s why Koreans hold these outrageous beliefs that Japan, being the stronger and richer nation, will somehow “win” in a Judicial Court System because that’s how things are done in the Korean judicial system.

    It’s very sad..I know, but the reality.

  5. wiesunja Says:

    If Takeshima didn’t exist the South Koreans would eventually invent it. They can’t stand not being able to vent their inferiority complex ridden hatred of others. I’m convinced that it’s pretty much part of their intrinsic genetic character. Probably handed down from 5000 years ago from that bear from whom they claim to be descended. LOL

  6. wiesunja Says:

    Watching Koreans reminds alot of watching “The Three Stooges” on TV..except that in the case of the Koreans, they aren’t acting. The stuff they say is real.

    “Island Nation” is an insult in Korea? I think it stems more from an inferiority complex in that both the UK and Japan being small island nations were able to kick major ass (namely that of Korea) in the past few hundred years. Please, believe me…Korea wishes secretly that it could have been even 1/10 as powerful as an island nation such as Britain or Japan. Too bad they are stuck with being only a half-ass island (peninsula).

  7. camphortree Says:

    When Koreans call Japan an island nation I heard that it derogatorily means 島国根性。Queer, are Koreans really proud of being a part of Greater China or Greater Mongolia? I respect Chinese and Mongolian culture, but Japan being off the coast of the continent is a blessing for many reasons.

  8. Errol Says:

    wiesunja Says:
    July 23rd, 2008 at 3:11 pm

    Because, the Koreans are projecting their own ideas and cultural views of the law onto the international scene … Koreans grow up seeing that in their society, the one who achieves justice or gets what he/she wants is not the person who obeys the law … it’s the person who screams the loudest or has the most money.

    … or who bounces a bat on the bonces of rival bonzes as clicking on this sentence fragment will show.

    Now many Koreans will claim that this type of violent behaviour is uncommon.

    Or they will claim that only uneducated Koreans engage in such behaviour.

    Lee Seo-won, a professor of Yonsei University, begs to differ.

    Click on this sentence to see the link that shows 25.8 percent of (Korean) men without college degrees and 37.7 percent of (Korean) men with college degrees surveyed had beaten their wives during the last year.

  9. wiesunja Says:

    Has anyone taken a look at the Marmot’s Hole lately? That place has become a cesspool of Korean trolls (NES and Stacked…I think actually that they are both the same person with a controlled IP changer) indulging in a Korean’s wet dream of orgasmic pleasure by freely spewing racial epithet after racial epithet under total impunity by their whore to the Korean trolls, Robert Koehler.

    It’s unbelievable that the Marmot condones and lets these two sick retarded Korean spew their garbage freely while banning anyone who even mutters the word “gook” at the drop of a hat.

  10. HanComplex Says:

    Interesting points, errol and wiesunja. It’s really unfortunate that the idea of fairness and following the rule of the law is an unknown concept in Korea. Then again, it’s not really surprising since it’s Korean culture we’re talking about.

    These guys protesting are morons. They’ve got the gall to protest while in the country that accepted them and took them in. Ungrateful wretches. They should just go back to their dirty, backwater country since it’s clear where their allegiances lie. Even better, they ought to be just deported. Like I’ve stated before, all of these first world countries like the USA, Japan, Australia, etc. should put restrictions or even ban Koreans from coming to their shores. All they do is bring trouble, as we’ve seen with Cho Seung-Hui, Robert Kim, or the thousands of Korean whores. Then these countries would have less problems to worry about.

  11. Errol Says:

    HanComplex Says:
    July 24th, 2008 at 12:18 pm

    All they do is bring trouble, as we’ve seen with Cho Seung-Hui, Robert Kim, or the thousands of Korean whores.

    All? No. The figures are quite clear only about 30% of Korean men are prone to marital violence and 20% of Korean women have worked in the prostitution industry and 75% of married Korean men using prostitutes.

    By writing All you unfairly malign the 70% of Korean men who are not prone to marital violence, the 80% of Korean women who have not worked in the prostitution industry and the 25% of married men who do not used prostitutes.

    The problem for innocent Koreans (and for immigration authorities) is how to identify which is which.

    Imagine being a single female on a subway carriage with 12 single Korean men sitting opposite you. 4 are almost certainly prone to marital violence and 9 of them will engage in prostitution during their marriage.

    Which one will you marry?

  12. fh Says:

    An open question:
    (though this may not be the appropriate place to ask, so please advise)

    To long time veterans of the Liancourt dispute, how does one reason with opponents, assuming it is possible in some regard? Is attempting to engage in civil discussion at all productive, in the hope that “maybe this time” (flying in the face of all other failures) progress might somehow be made? Is it better to ignore inflammatory remarks in the chance that the flames die out before a passerby is “burned” by them?

    I ask because Marx offered some interesting views on the “nationalist character” of 2ch regarding Korea, WaiWai, etc (with some enlightening discussion afterwards):
    http://neojaponisme.com/2008/07/24/members-of-a-nation-state/

    I’m wondering if a similar analysis of Korean proponents (maybe starting with VANK?) could prove useful in developing a better understanding of an underlying divisive nature of this issue (what constitutes Korean nationalism, what mechanisms cause Koreans to feel so strongly, etc). In other words, would it be useful to step back and invest some introspection on the character of the debate itself and not simply the “news”, “facts”, “lies”, etc?

    After all, many comments are quick to blame the government’s brainwashing, backwards conecpt of law in Korea, emotional savagery of Koreans, and so on. But while the reactions certainly paint such an image from a certain point of view, doesn’t that simply propogate a possible “misunderstanding” that may in fact be fueling the perceived inferiority complex? (Though I’ll be careful not to say that the reactions are somehow “justified”)

    Or am I just thinking too much?

  13. kjeff Says:

    wiesunja,

    “The tons of university students in Korean universities (I know as I taught in Korean universities for many years)…”

    Wow…you taught universities in Korea…wow…개나소나 can be a lecturer there I guess.

  14. kjeff Says:

    Oh…good to see the usual masturbators(is there such word?) back in top form…must have been waiting for this for quite some time.

    Matt,

    I bet if you look really really hard -arghhh, I’m gonna get “It’s not that hard” response-, you’d probably find Korean husband beat his foreign wife, Korean company stiffed its foreign workers, Korean execs prosecuted for bribery, Koreans execs pardoned, Korean prostitution ring busted, Korean immigrants drunk-driving, hit-and-run, shot-and-killed someone articles every day. Gotta keep the blog alive, can’t really just wait for the Japanese government to revise their textbook to have this much fun… Gotta care about your audience more, no?

    Forgot, Korean spy…

  15. Matt Says:

    kjeff, you are right there are many such articles. Plenty, like the stuff about the Korean executive in the USA on the run from police, or the latest prostitution bust of prostitutes from you know where.

    But I am not trying to bring up a list of Korean misbehavior. I am only interested in it as it relates to other peoples. I am more interested in the motives behind the behavior, not the behavior itself. That is why you won’t see a list here.

    This post and others shows some pretty unusual behavior, and that is the only stuff I post. I am not going to waste my time with endless crime stories and such because I am not out to demonize Koreans.

  16. Errol Says:

    fh Says:
    July 25th, 2008 at 2:18 am

    In other words, would it be useful to step back and invest some introspection on the character of the debate itself and not simply the “news”, “facts”, “lies”, etc?

    After all, many comments are quick to blame the government’s brainwashing, backwards concept of law in Korea, emotional savagery of Koreans, and so on.

    Therre is an alternative theory proposed by one of my colleagues he calls it the Rule by Seonbae or Rule by Oppa for females adherents. It is a similar concept to Rule by Law. The theory arose after he witnessed a lecture by a “famous” Korean sociology professor.

    The Korean professor was explaining to his first year students the hierarchy of the university system in Korea. He claimed that it was an immutable system of obedience in a seonabe-hubae relationship, similar to that of traditional Korean marital relationships.

    Colleague: “He claimed that hubae must always acquiesce to the hot love of the seonbae. Apparently in a Korean marriage the male has an irrestible urge to have sex. The traditional wife is modest and so resists the irrestible urge of the male who then seeks solace elsewhere.”

    Moi: “That’s a novel excuse.”

    Colleague: “The chap then pulled out of his pocket a red gochu which he then held aloft and puncutated the air with rapid, rabbitlike thrusts.”

    Moi: [Shrugs shoulders] “63 years after the Japanese Occupation at least one Korean has stopped blaming Japan.”

  17. alec931 Says:

    @13:
    Sure does explain the rage and animosity (and sockpuppetting for that matter LOL). I guess wiesunja found out the hard way that Korean girls don’t sleep with douchebags even if he is (Chinese) American. :(

  18. empraptor Says:

    lmao this is the funniest story i’ve read today.