The 2016 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine goes to Yoshinori Ohsumi for discoveries about autophagy – how the body breaks down and recycles cellular components.

Ohsumi’s work is important because it helps explain what goes wrong in a range of diseases, from cancer to Parkinson’s.

Posted by Errol, filed under Uncategorized. Date: October 3, 2016, 2:53 am | No Comments »

The new Anti Bribery and Corruption Law, often called the Kim Young-ra Law, offer new opportunities for training Korean paparazzi who report violators with photo evidence.These paparazzi are dubbed ranparazzi after Kim Young-ran.

At a ranparazzi academy on a recent evening, a lecturer, identified by just his family name of Yun, told of a tale of his heroism. “Once I checked into a provincial motel paying the bill with cash and ordered a coffee from a nearby tearoom. When the delivery woman (prostitute) was taking a shower, I reported the motel as a tax dodger and the tearoom as a pimp and earned 1 million and 2 million, respectively, from the two reports. Since I paid 250,000 won for the motel bill and coffee, I netted 2.75 million won”.

Choi Sung-jin, The Korea Times, 1 October 2016

 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Economics, Law. Date: October 3, 2016, 12:11 am | No Comments »

Seoul Central District Prosecutors’ Office said it indicted Lee Chang-suk, 50, without physical detention for not handing over a 40 percent stake in the ball club to a Korean-American businessman that he had promised in return for 2 billion won ($1.8 million).

The prosecutors also indicted Namkoong Jong-hwan, the general manager of the Heroes, without physical detention, for aiding Lee.

Lee approached Hong Sung-eun, chairman of the Atlanta-based real estate developer Rainier Group, to invest the money in exchange for a stake in baseball club Nexen Heroes.

However, Hong didn’t receive his share and he filed a petition against Lee with prosecutors in May. Investigators then raided the home and office of Lee, and also placed him under an overseas travel ban.

The two executives inflicted financial losses worth 1.7 billion won on the company by receiving excessive bonuses from their advertisement deals. They also lent 200 million won without collateral to a businessman for opening a hostess bar, according to the prosecutors.

The Korea Times 30 September 2016

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, finger chopping wacky, K-girls, Scams. Date: October 2, 2016, 11:56 pm | No Comments »

A female private institute teacher was sentenced to eight months jail, suspended for two years, for making love with a male middle school student, 13, according to Incheon District Court on Sunday.

The court also ordered the teacher to serve 120 hours of community service, according to Yonhap news agency.

The teacher, 32, allegedly made love with the student four times between Oct. 9-25, 2015.

The court heard that the teacher and the student became close while sharing the same route home, and that the teacher proposed they have a sexual relationship.

She sent the student suggestive messages such as “Let’s bath together” and “Let’s hug” even before they first had sexual intercourse.

The teacher claimed the sexual intercourse took place with consent and therefore had no grounds for being charged with sexual assault.

“I love my teacher and I don’t want her to be punished,” the student told investigators. “However, I admit I was embarrassed while having sexual intercourse with her.”

The court ruled: “The student was only 13 years old, which makes him unlikely to have proper knowledge about having sexual intercourse.

“Therefore we judged that he did not properly consent to having sexual intercourse with his teacher.”

“The defendant used the student’s lack of sexual knowledge to pleasure herself sexually.

“From a common moral point of view this is viewed as a sexual assault.”

Lee Han-soo, The Korea Times, 28 August 2016

What prevented the Korean police from suggesting to the Korean female teacher that she “settle the case amicably” as a male teacher did in Incheon in 2012? As reported in the article: “Sex abuse against teens rising: report”.

Yoon Min-sik, The Korea Herald, 29 August 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, K-girls, Law. Date: August 30, 2016, 3:27 am | No Comments »

A female gyopo drug trafficker who allegedly has been supplying Korean drug dealers in Seoul and Busan was caught in Los Angeles, police said Tuesday.

The alleged trafficker, 41, known by the codename “Iris,” was arrested in June after a yearlong investigation by Korean prosecutors and investigators from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the U.S. Office of Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO).

She is in custody and will be extradited to Seoul in September.

Korean police said she is suspected of being a ggangpae dumog in the Korean drug supply network because her codename has been mentioned several times in the testimony of drug suppliers caught in Korea.

Hong Dam-young, The Korea Times, 30 August 2016

Posted by Errol, filed under Battle Report, Crime, K-girls, Law. Date: August 30, 2016, 3:00 am | No Comments »

Choi Sung-jin at The Korea Times reports that: “50.8 percent of Korean men have cheated on their wives.”

“Among men who cheated on their wives, those with sexual problems outnumbered those who had no problems.

“Men with sexual dysfunction often do not think it their problem but that of their wife or their poor marital compatibility,” said Kang Dong-woo of the Korean Institute for Sexual and Couple’s Heath. “They think their sexual ability will improve with other women.”

The Korea Times, 1 August 2016

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, finger chopping wacky, K-girls, Law. Date: August 3, 2016, 4:10 am | 2 Comments »

The Supreme Public Prosecutors’ Office said Monday it will investigate an old video showing Samsung Group chairman Lee Kun-hee apparently paying women for sex.

The Samsung Group in a statement last week did not deny that the man in the clips is Lee but added it was a “personal matter” and expressed regret for causing “a stir.”

The Joseon Ilbo, 26 July 2016

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, finger chopping wacky, K-girls, Law, Technology. Date: July 26, 2016, 3:19 am | No Comments »

From a Donga Ilbo editorial

“Some talk about the rise of “alpha girls” but those alpha girls are held back by these discriminative policies at work. They seem to still have a long way to struggle.”

“Ms. Lee, who works at a public agency under a municipal government, filed a complaint to the National Human Rights Commission after being refused of application for family allowance to support her mother. Her workplace had a policy of granting allowance to first sons who do not live parents but only to first daughters in the same situation who had no siblings. Ms. Lee was supporting her family and a younger brother in school. The commission saw the case as “violation of equal rights” and advised the agency to revise the policy. They saw it as a clear discrimination against women based on conventional perception of sex, which puts all burden of supporting immediate ascendants to men’s shoulders.”

Regarding this, Ms Lee’s employer stated that most Korea government agencies favour Korean men.

Donga Ilbo 6 July 2016

Posted by Errol, filed under Culture, finger chopping wacky, K-girls, Law, Politics. Date: July 6, 2016, 12:49 am | No Comments »

Culture critic Lee said hwabyeong has its roots in the feudal Korean kingdom that lasted from 1392 to 1897, as its strict class hierarchy and patriarchy offered no social mobility.

“For those who belonged to the lower caste, there really was no way for them to fight injustice if they were abused by those who belonged to the higher class,” he said. “The only way was to just endure it. And we also have to remind ourselves that the slavery system from the Joseon kingdom did not completely disappear in Korea until the 1940s.”

Koreans becoming more prone to rage, Korea Times, 30 March 2016

A U.S. citizen, who was  then 17 years old, said she was raped by a Korean man in Seoul in 2014 when she was on an exchange program at a high school. Unlike Mattner, she decided to stay silent and not tell anyone of her “shameful” experience.

“He was Korean and I am (a) foreigner, so I was scared that I might not win the case. I didn’t want to go through the pain of facing the Korean court system and exposing my rape to my friends and family, for the chance that he might go to jail,” she told The Korea Herald. “I learned that the hard way, but Korea needs to develop better resources when dealing with rape.”

Kim Bo-hwa, a senior researcher from the Korea Sexual Violence Relief Center, said that the ordeal is equally felt among Korean victims due to lack of awareness of sexual crimes here.

“Rape victims here suffer from insensitivity toward them among government officials, lawyers, their families,” she told The Korea Herald.

Korea’s justice system fails foreign victims of rape, Korea Times, 30 March 2016

One of the victims listed in the Korea Times article has a gofundme page.

https://www.gofundme.com/justiceforairdre

 

 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, Law. Date: March 31, 2016, 4:17 am | No Comments »

7:13 p.m.: Cho was sexually molested by a family friend from age five to 12. “I had a very long-term relationship with this abuser, which is a horrible thing to say. I didn’t even understand it was abuse, because I was too young to know,” she says. “I endured it so many times, especially because I was alone a lot.” At 14, she was raped by another acquaintance. “I was raped continuously through my teenage years, and I didn’t know how to stop it. It was also an era where young girls were being sexualized. For me, I think I had been sexually abused so much in my life that it was hard for me to let go of anger, forgive or understand what happened.”

7:14 p.m.: She looks over at Moraga, who is texting on his cell phone. “I guess we can play that song now,” she says to him. “I hope I can remember the lyrics.”

7:15 p.m.: The song, entitled “I Want to Kill My Rapist,” is from her new album. Cho starts singing: “I want to kill my rapist, I want to kill my rapist,” repeatedly to me while Andy strums an acoustic guitar. The rest of the lyrics elaborate on this theme and are occasionally funny, but it comes from a real and dark place. She continues, “I thought I forgave you, but I’d mistake you. I’ll shake you and I’ll bake you. You better run now while I’m having fun now. Here comes the sun now, and you’ll be done now. I see clearly and sincerely, you’ll pay dearly…”

7:22 p.m.: Cho admits that her abuser is still alive and her family knows about it. She says that sexual molestation is an excusable offense in her traditional Korean family’s eyes, which she thinks is insane. Her family believes that people shouldn’t make a fuss about things that have happened to them in the past. “They don’t really want to talk about it, because that would make it real somehow. I think Asian culture often is in denial about such things. Like, if they don’t talk about it, it doesn’t exist. So it makes me unwelcome in some ways,” she says. “But all I have is ownership of my own suffering. I can take that and explain it in a way that helps resolve it. But I often think, ‘How do I have sanity? How do I bring justice?’ I kind of save myself through it. ”

 

Danielle Bacher , Billboard, 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, K-girls. Date: September 7, 2015, 2:45 am | No Comments »

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