According to data compiled by the Ministry of Security and Public Administration, the number of residents from outside the country came to 1.57 million as of Jan. 1, up 8.6 percent from a year ago and taking up 3.1 percent of the nation’s population of 51 million.

It marks the eighth consecutive year that the figure has risen on-year. The government started compiling related data in 2006.

Foreign residents refer to people staying in South Korea for longer than 90 days, naturalized South Korean citizens, marriage migrants and their children.

The ministry attributed this year’s growth to eased requirements for an Overseas Korean (F-4) visa and an increase in applications for permanent residency among ethnic Koreans with non-South Korean citizenship.

Of the foreign residents, nearly 539,000, or 34.4 percent of the total, are workers from abroad with no South Korean nationality.

Korea Herald 2 July 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Economics, Law, Politics. Date: July 2, 2014, 1:20 am | No Comments »

Park Jin-young 02

42-year-old Park Jin-young married in October 2013 the second daughter of Yoo Byung-ho, the recently arrested younger brother of fugitive ferry owner Yoo Byung-eun.

As Park’s 62-year-old father-in-law is a key leader of the Salvation Sect cult, the prosecution is set to widen the scope of its probe into JYP Entertainment as part of its effort to verify a variety of charges against  73-year-old Yoo Byung-eun.

While investigators are looking into JYP’s bank accounts in coordination with the Financial Supervisory Service, some market insiders raised the possibility that the prosecution will soon summon Park.

Park has recently argued that he and his parents are not devotees of the Salvation Sect cult and he was paid nothing from the religious group.

JYP Entertainment agency also claimed that it has made no business partnership or cross-funding transactions with sister firms of Chonghaejin Marine Co., the operator of the tragic Sewol.

Meanwhile, foreign investors and corporate investors have continued to dump their stake in JYP Entertainment on the secondary KOSDAQ over the past few weeks.

While its closing price was 6,080 won ($5.96) per share on April 15, a day before the ferry tragedy, it has ranged between 4,200 won and 5,500 won won since. Foreigners’ shareholding ratio in the company has dropped to 0.42 percent, from 1.0 percent in early May.

By Kim Yon-se Korea Herald Canada Day 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Economics, Law. Date: July 2, 2014, 1:10 am | No Comments »

25f8fcbd-46d1-4a3f-9ce3-5de588ad5b09-460x276

New South Wales Fire and Rescue Commissioner Greg Mullins said firefighters were shocked to find young Japanese and Korean men cohabiting at a Sydney industrial site when they were called to the large inner-city blaze in the early hours of the morning.

The group were reportedly in their late teens and early 20s and from Japan and South Korea, although a New South Wales police spokeswoman could not confirm their identities.

“When (firefighters) arrived they thought they had a normal industrial fire, but within a couple of minutes it became a rescue operation,” Mullins told reporters.

“They were living in squalor. There were beds in old minibuses, a shipping container and an old caravan with a massive fire moving towards them.

“The firefighters had to shield the people from the heat to get them to safety. They were too frightened to move. There were 20-metre flames.”

AFP July 2, 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Law. Date: July 2, 2014, 12:03 am | 1 Comment »

Nam Hyun-woo reports in the Korea Times on 30 June 2014

The Korean football team received a shower of wrapped yeot candies from a fan who was disappointed by the lackluster effort of such well paid icons of Korea during their less than sparkling performances in Brazil upon its return to Incheon International Airport, Monday morning. The fan also shouted ‘엿이나 먹어라’. i.e. “Eat candy.” Apparently pumpkin flavoured.

Video of the incident is supplied by the BBC.

Forward Son Heung-min, one of the better players in Korea’s World Cup campaign, made a pensive observation, saying, “Do we have to eat this?” He didn’t eat any.

However, he couldn’t miss a big banner in the terminal reading “Korea’s football is dead.” Footage of the same man who threw the candy can be seen holding the banner at the 1 minute and 25 seconds mark on MBC’s website.

140630_p01_son

Kwon Sang-soo in the Joongang Daily also covered the story and interviewed some of the disappointed fans.

“We threw the candy because they [the national team] screwed us,” said Cho Ho-yeon, who introduced himself as a member of the online group “We lost because of you.”

“We need to totally reform Korean football from the beginning. They run the team like the mafia. The coach favored the particular players that he likes and some of the players were selected because they went to the same university as the coach. I can’t see a difference between the coach and members of the ‘gwanfia,’” he said. Gwanfia is a term combining the Korean word for government official and mafia.

Cho said the online group has 500 members and that about 10 people went to the airport to express their disgust with the team’s performance.

In Korean, the phrase “eat yeot” is an offensive slur equivalent to “screw you,” which originated in the 1960s when students protested against the Education Ministry over a question on their school exam regarding how the taffy is made.

Posted by Errol, filed under finger chopping wacky. Date: June 30, 2014, 11:00 pm | No Comments »

.
Problem

In the Culture Section of the Joongang Ilbo on 24 June 2014, Sung So-young reports on the culture of older Korean men.

Chief inspector Kim Man-wuk, who works for the special victims unit at the North Chungcheong Provincial Police Agency, often has to take on sexual abuse cases involving vulnerable people such as minors or the mentally disabled.

But he recently got away from his daily routine to do something else: lecture elderly men in their 60s and 70s on what constitutes a sex crime.

Kim gave the talks at 14 different senior community centers within the province between March and May.

“Working for this special victims unit, I’ve realized many old men sexually harass little girls or women with intellectual disabilities in their neighborhoods,” said Kim.

The chief inspector arranged for the lectures to be conducted in plain language in the hopes of “preventing some sexual crimes by older people.”

“I asked them not to touch the breasts or private parts of girls even if they think the girls are cute and pretty,” said Kim.

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture. Date: June 25, 2014, 8:50 pm | No Comments »

June 24,2014

The Seoul Family Court on Sunday ruled in favor of a Philippine woman and her two sons in a paternity suit against the children’s South Korean father, officially acknowledging their biological connection.

The court accepted the blood relationship between the Korean man and his Kopino children – a term that refers to a child born out of wedlock to a Philippine mother and a Korean father – based on DNA test results and the boys’ birth certificates.

The ruling is the first of its kind here and is likely to have broader implications for the tens of thousands of abandoned Kopino children who exist outside the country.

Kopino children, also called “Korinoy” in Filipino slang, are mostly born between Philippine women and Korean men who travel to Southeast Asia for business or study.

The majority of Kopino children are neglected or abandoned by their fathers, a trend that has resulted in the use of the term “ugly Korean” by locals, and left the mothers of the babies with few options. The Philippines is a predominantly Catholic country and abortion there is illegal.

In the paternity suit, the Seoul Family Court’s Judge Kwon Yang-hee concluded that the Philippine woman’s 16-year-old and 14-year-old sons were the biological children of the Korean defendant.

The names of all parties in the suit were withheld for privacy.

The Korean man was already married and had two children in Korea when he moved alone to the Philippines in 1997 for business, where he cohabited with the woman for seven years and fathered the two boys. In 2004, however, he abruptly returned to Korea and severed all contact.

But the woman flew to Korea with the man’s picture and name, and managed to locate him in 2012. With assistance from the Emergency Support Center for Migrant Women, she filed a paternity suit for her children in December the same year.

The defendant initially refused DNA testing, arguing that it would destroy his family in Korea, but relented under the threat of a court-ordered injunction and fine. Once the ruling is finalized, the plaintiffs will be entitled to child support. The children will also be included on the man’s official family register.

According to civic groups, the number of Kopino children has increased rapidly in recent years, making it an issue of growing concern. The exact number of Kopino children is difficult to pinpoint, but Ecpat International, a global network of organizations dedicated to protecting children, estimates that there are about 30,000.

BY SHIM SAE-ROM, KIM BONG-MOON [[email protected]]

http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/Article.aspx?aid=2991044

—-

Sometimes Korean officialdom does get something right!

Posted by Dokdodevil, filed under Law. Date: June 25, 2014, 7:23 pm | No Comments »

성햔아

Sung Hyun-ah 성햔아 charged for (sic) prostitution

Korea Joongang Daily

June 25 2014

The Suwon District Court’s Ansan branch yesterday charged actress Sung Hyun-ah with prostitution and fined her 2 million won ($1,963).

In December, the 38-year-old actress was indicted for receiving money from a businessman in exchange for having sexual relations with him. The prosecutors stated that in 2010 the then 34 year old Sung met up with a man three times and received 50 million won (~ USD 50 000) in return. Sung countersued in January, according to press reports, and the first trial was held in February.

The actress’s lawyer noted “there is nothing to say about the case,” and added that they will expose the truth on the final judgment day, Aug. 8.

Having debuted in 1994 as a runner-up for Miss Korea, Sung has since pursued an acting career and starred in some successful drama series.

But the celebrity’s path as an entertainer hasn’t been rosy; when she was 25 years old in 2001, she was sentenced to eight months in prison for drug use.

By Kim Hee-eun, contributing writer

In 2012 the Joseon Ilbo reported that: “Almost 60 percent of (the 111 actresses who responded to a survey by the Korean Women’s Development Institute) said they believed rejecting sexual advances would disadvantage their careers, and 48.4 percent said they had in fact lost out on appearances on shows because they refused.”

The prostitution allegedly occurred 3 times 4 years ago. Was there any forensic evidence still extant? Did the Korean businessman’s bank accounts show a deposit in Ms Sung’s accounts? Or did the court rely solely on the testimony of an admitted prostitution customer? How did the police find out? Was the Korean businessman boasting in a room salon and one of his seonbae hunted down Ms Sung was peremptorily rejected and in a fit of hwabyeong whinged to the Korea National Police?

Update

The Korea Times reported on 24 June 2014 that: “Prosecutors are seeking a 3 million won fine for the businessman, 49, identified only as Chae, and an 18-month jail term for another man, Kang, 40, who allegedly set up the actress with Chae.”

Was the set up arranged in a golf club?

The Korea Times also provided a photo.

Sung Hyun-ah 02

Posted by Errol, filed under Economics, K-girls. Date: June 24, 2014, 10:46 pm | 2 Comments »

Open borders ‘libertarians’ don’t want to face the contradictions of their ideology.

Imagine for a moment a libertarian utopia. In this utopia there is no or very limited government. People are free to do as they wish, as long as they do not steal or use violence or coercion against others. Because of this the libertarian utopia is very prosperous. Many people would like to live there.

One day the libertarian utopia decides to open it’s borders to newcomers. They flood in. Some of them fit in, but some of them do not. For whatever reason some of them are unable to find employment. Reasons are given such as ill physical or mental health, poor skill set, racism of employers in libertarian utopia, and so on.

Some of these migrants engage in crime, overburdening the hitherto light police force. Charities are overburdened, and many migrants are refusing to pay hospital bills. Social problems increase, leading to unhappiness among the new migrants and the people that were there in the first place.

Soon enough the migrants are enough in number that they are able to gain some special privileges in some areas. They demand democracy and social justice, and they get it in the form of welfare benefits, housing, and other government services unknown in the former libertarian utopia until now.

To the regret of the original residents of libertarian utopia, it turns out that most of the migrants were in fact statists, and did not follow the culture of libertarian utopia at all.

And thus ended the libertarian utopia experiment. Those liberties, so hard won, were lost in open borders foolishness. The leadership of libertarian utopia believed that the migrants were blank slates they they could mold to their liking. They were wrong.

Open borders libertarianism is a contradiction in itself. One destroys the other.

Posted by Matt, filed under finger chopping wacky. Date: June 19, 2014, 6:11 am | 2 Comments »

The smell of desperation in the entertainment industry is more powerful than …?

Consider this tale: it is 2 pm in the south river section of the metropolis. Two young entertainers are sitting in the outer office of a TV producer, who is casting for a new soap opera: The Koffee Klown King, to be sponsored by Kimchi Koffee and Kreepy Krene.

The first girl, accompanied by her agent, is wearing green camouflage hotpants and a skimpy medium green singlet that displays her implants to advantage. The sounds of the latest pop hits are leaking from her modish earphones. Her golden heifer bobble earrings bop along to the tunes. The pert young thing sings in a teen group known as: Golfclub Villa Girlz.

The other girl, whose nose seems to have been sculpted by the same surgeon, is sitting demurely in a white blouse, pleated navy blue skirt and knee length white socks. Her mother, seated next to her, primly holds a French trombone case labelled Juillard and also sports a surgically enhanced nose.

Due to their similar appearance, the TV producer relies on his usual metric to decide between actresses aspiring to star in coffee commercials: a French roast examination.

He calls in the first girl’s agent and explains his dilemma and his demands. The agent quickly says: “My girl is sponsored by KK Donuts and last week she went to a famous golf club, going doggy style multiple times with the CEO of KKD and milking the full eight centimetres of the president of Kimchi Koffee Corporation with her pouty lips.”

The producer calls in the other aspirant’s mother to tell her that the other girl has the right specifications for the role.

The mother calmly informs the producer: “Au contraire, mon petit champignon. There is a fait accompli.”

“Last night my daughter was down on all fours while your company president rogered her from behind and the full eight centimetres of the KKC’s president was gobbled lustily by a younger one of my daughters in your president’s villa, while the rest of the golf club fapped furiously to the live feed of my youngest daughter servicing all the TV critics from famous university media outlets.”

The teenage secretary of the producer has overheard this interchange on the office intercom, he quickly minces into the producer’s office, girlishly flicks back his bangs, places his arms akimbo and mewls: “I have been pwactising Fwench with our company pwesident’s son for the last four months and scwewing the pooches of his lusty fwiends for two! I was pwomised the part!”

The TV producer slumps back in his chair, slaps his forehead and croaks: “Doh!”

A catfight ensues.

The bra ripping and panty tearing is captured on CCTV, stolen by security guards and twenty minutes of video is uploaded onto a website, where it is advertised for sale to over 18s by 3:00 pm.

By 3:30 pm a middle school boy has cracked the code and by midnight the video has been downloaded more times than Golfclub Villa Girlz’ latest youtube hit: “Getting groped by creepy old guys in the golfclub.

Posted by Errol, filed under Economics, finger chopping wacky, Music, Scams. Date: June 15, 2014, 5:41 am | No Comments »

The Korean grandmothers who sell sex
By Lucy Williamson BBC News, Seoul

Koreans could once be sure that their children would look after them in their old age, but no longer – many of those who worked hard to transform the country’s economy find the next generation has other spending priorities. As a result, some elderly women are turning to prostitution.

Kim Eun-ja sits on the steps at Seoul’s Jongno-3 subway station, scanning the scene in front of her. The 71-year-old’s bright lipstick and shiny red coat stand out against her papery skin.

Beside her is a large bag, from which comes the clink of glass bottles as she shifts on the cold concrete.

Mrs Kim is one of South Korea’s “Bacchus Ladies” – older women who make a living by selling tiny bottles of the popular Bacchus energy drink to male customers.

But often that’s not all they’re selling. At an age when Korean grandmothers are supposed to be venerated as matriarchs, some are selling sex.
“You see those Bacchus Ladies standing over there?” she asks me. “Those ladies sell more than Bacchus. They sometimes go out with the grandpas and earn money from them. But I don’t make a living like that.

“Men do proposition me when I’m standing in the alleyway,” she adds. “But I always say, ‘No.’”

Mrs Kim says she makes about 5,000 Won ($5, or £3) a day selling the drinks. “Drink up fast,” she says. “The police are always watching me. They don’t differentiate.”

The centre of this underground sex trade is a nearby park in the heart of Seoul. Jongmyo Park is a place where elderly men come to while away their sunset years with a little chess and some local gossip.

It’s built around a temple to Confucius, whose ideas on venerating elders have shaped Korean culture for centuries. But under the budding trees outside, the fumbling transactions of its elderly men and women tell the real story of Korean society in the 21st Century.

Women in their 50s, 60, even their 70s, stand around the edges of the park, offering drinks to the men. Buy one, and it’s the first step in a lonely journey that ends in a cheap motel nearby.

The men in the park are more willing to talk to me than the women.

Standing around a game of Korean chess, a group of grandfathers watch the match intently. About half the men here use the Bacchus Ladies, they say.

“We’re men, so we’re curious about women,” says 60-year-old Mr Kim.

“We have a drink, and slip a bit of money into their hands, and things happen!” he cackles. “Men like to have women around – whether they’re old or not, sexually active or not. That’s just male psychology.”

Another man, 81 years old, excitedly showed me his spending money for the day. “It’s for drinking with my friends,” he said. “We can find girlfriends here, too – from those women standing over there. They’ll ask us to play with them. They say, ‘Oh, I don’t have any money,’ and then they glue on to us. Sex with them costs 20,000 to 30,000 Won (£11-17), but sometimes they’ll give you a discount if they know you.”

South Korea’s grandparents are victims of their country’s economic success.

As they worked to create Korea’s economic miracle, they invested their savings in the next generation. In a Confucian society, successful children are the best form of pension.

But attitudes here have changed just as fast as living standards, and now many young people say they can’t afford to support themselves and their parents in Korea’s fast-paced, highly competitive society.

The government, caught out by this rapid change, is scrambling to provide a welfare system that works. In the meantime, the men and women in Jongmyo Park have no savings, no realistic pension, and no family to rely on. They’ve become invisible – foreigners in their own land.

“Those who rely on their children are stupid,” says Mr Kim. “Our generation was submissive to our parents. We respected them. The current generation is more educated and experienced, so they don’t listen to us.

“I’m 60 years old and I don’t have any money. I can’t trust my children to help. They’re in deep trouble because they have to start preparing for their old age. Almost all of the old folks here are in the same situation.”

Most Bacchus women have only started selling sex later in life, as a result of this new kind of old-age poverty, according to Dr Lee Ho-Sun, who is perhaps the only researcher to have studied them in detail.

One woman she interviewed first turned to prostitution at the age of 68. About 400 women work in the park, she says, all of whom will have been taught as children that respect and honour were worth more than anything.

“One Bacchus woman said to me ‘I’m hungry, I don’t need respect, I don’t need honour, I just want three meals a day,” Lee says.

Police, who routinely patrol the area but are rarely able to make an arrest, privately say this problem will never be solved by crackdowns, that senior citizens need an outlet for stress and sexual desire, and that policy needs to change.

But law-enforcement isn’t the only problem.

Inside those bags the Bacchus Ladies carry is the source of a hidden epidemic: a special injection supposed to help older men achieve erections – delivered directly into the vein. Dr Lee confirms that the needles aren’t disposed of afterwards, but used again – 10 or 20 times.

The results, she says, can be seen in one local survey, which found that almost 40% of the men tested had a sexually transmitted disease¬ despite the fact that some of the most common diseases weren’t included in the test. With most sex education classes aimed at teenagers, this has the makings of a real problem. Some local governments have now begun offering sex education clinics especially for seniors.

Hidden in a dingy warren of alleyways in central Seoul, is the place where these lonely journeys end – the narrow corridors of a “love motel” and one of the grey rooms which open off them.

Inside, a large bed takes up most of the space, its thin mattress and single pillow hardly inviting a long night’s sleep. On the bed-head is a sticker: for room service press zero; for pornography press three; and if you want the electric blanket, you’ll find the wire on the far side of the bed.

So here you have food, sex, and even a little warmth all at the touch of a button. If only it were that simple outside the motel room, in South Korea’s rich, hi-tech society.

But for the grandparents who built its fearsome economy, food is expensive, sex is cheap, and human warmth rarely available at any price.

Listen to Lucy Williamson’s report for Assignment on the BBC World Service on Thursday – or catch up later on the BBC iPlayer

Follow @BBCNewsMagazine on Twitter and on Facebook

(Original story with photos and ads here: BBC)

Posted by Dokdodevil, filed under finger chopping wacky. Date: June 15, 2014, 4:13 am | 5 Comments »

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