7:13 p.m.: Cho was sexually molested by a family friend from age five to 12. “I had a very long-term relationship with this abuser, which is a horrible thing to say. I didn’t even understand it was abuse, because I was too young to know,” she says. “I endured it so many times, especially because I was alone a lot.” At 14, she was raped by another acquaintance. “I was raped continuously through my teenage years, and I didn’t know how to stop it. It was also an era where young girls were being sexualized. For me, I think I had been sexually abused so much in my life that it was hard for me to let go of anger, forgive or understand what happened.”

7:14 p.m.: She looks over at Moraga, who is texting on his cell phone. “I guess we can play that song now,” she says to him. “I hope I can remember the lyrics.”

7:15 p.m.: The song, entitled “I Want to Kill My Rapist,” is from her new album. Cho starts singing: “I want to kill my rapist, I want to kill my rapist,” repeatedly to me while Andy strums an acoustic guitar. The rest of the lyrics elaborate on this theme and are occasionally funny, but it comes from a real and dark place. She continues, “I thought I forgave you, but I’d mistake you. I’ll shake you and I’ll bake you. You better run now while I’m having fun now. Here comes the sun now, and you’ll be done now. I see clearly and sincerely, you’ll pay dearly…”

7:22 p.m.: Cho admits that her abuser is still alive and her family knows about it. She says that sexual molestation is an excusable offense in her traditional Korean family’s eyes, which she thinks is insane. Her family believes that people shouldn’t make a fuss about things that have happened to them in the past. “They don’t really want to talk about it, because that would make it real somehow. I think Asian culture often is in denial about such things. Like, if they don’t talk about it, it doesn’t exist. So it makes me unwelcome in some ways,” she says. “But all I have is ownership of my own suffering. I can take that and explain it in a way that helps resolve it. But I often think, ‘How do I have sanity? How do I bring justice?’ I kind of save myself through it. ”


Danielle Bacher , Billboard, 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, K-girls. Date: September 7, 2015, 2:45 am | No Comments »


Jay expected fried chicken – what he got was an avalanche of lawyers’ letters.

Then in the midst of all this, a less-than-enthusiastic review of Jinjuu by Fay Maschler, veteran critic for the London Evening Standard, is removed from the paper’s website. As a restaurant critic of some years’ standing, I can say that’s unusual. I am told that Joo wrote a letter of complaint about the review, which was forwarded to the Evening Standard. Will Gore, deputy managing editor of the Evening Standard, said the review had been taken down while Joo’s complaint was investigated. “I’ve now gone back to her to try and find a final resolution to the debate,” Gore said.

As I understand it, the letter is basically a long complaint that Maschler doesn’t appear to understand Korean food; that, for example, Korean fried chicken is meant to have a hard batter coating like hers does. Perhaps. It seems to me that this merely proves “authentic” really is not the same as “good”.

Jay Rayner, Observer Magazine, Sunday 26 April 2015


Posted by Errol, filed under Culture, finger chopping wacky, Funny, K-girls, Law. Date: May 3, 2015, 5:12 am | 1 Comment »

South Korea’s Constitutional Court threw out a decades-old anti-adultery law on Thursday, reflecting a growing importance of personal choice over marital order in a traditionally group-oriented society.

In a 7-2 decision, the nine-member bench ruled that Article 241 of the criminal code was unconstitutional.

“The anti-cheating law has been traditionally aimed at punishing women, but those days are long gone now,” Song Jae-ryong, a sociology professor at Kyung Hee University, said.

Others said the law was practically non-existent, as it had lost its effectiveness in preventing infidelity.

“The anti-adultery law is no longer achieving its purpose,” Kim Jeong-beom, a law professor at Hangyang University, said. “Penalties have become extremely light and don’t have the preventative effect they’re supposed to have.”

Kim Min-soo, an office worker, said. “It’s not like the ruling would make people feel freer to cheat than before.”

Love cheats are already rampant and adultery is institutionalised in a country where people don’t marry for romantic love but for jeong.

Park Sojung, Yonhap News, 26 February 2015


Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, Economics, K-girls, Law. Date: February 26, 2015, 4:38 pm | No Comments »


Kim’s label Oscar Entertainment released a statement on Friday saying that the singer was irritated before boarding a Korean Air flight.

“Kim drank some wine on the flight after he got distressed by Korean Air,” the agency said. According to Kim’s agency, Kim thinks he is always entitled to upgrade his economy class seat to a business class seat as he is a male Korean celebrity but Korean Air failed to do so by mistake.

“He does not exactly remember what mistakes he made,” it added.

The mistakes Bobby Kim made were forcibly cuddling a flight attendant, touching her arms and then loudly and aggressively verbally abusing her for about an hour.

Ock Hyun-ju, 9 January 2015, The Korea Herald

Stories of entitled minor Korean celebrities taking out their frustrations on hapless flight attendants are now less likely to be hushed up after the Nut Rage Incident of 2014. The soju defence is a common theme of these incidents. Is this the beginning of the end of the Modern Era of Yangban?

Even though Korean Air flight attendants are hosts and hostesses, an aircraft cabin is not a host or hostess bar for inebriated ajumma and ajeossi.

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, finger chopping wacky, Law, Scams, Science. Date: January 10, 2015, 4:00 am | No Comments »

In 2014, at least 30 000 of the 240 000 Korean teenagers working in Korea stated that they were not paid at all, according to a report released by the Korean Gender Equality Ministry.

25 000 stated that they were sexually or verbally harassed.

190 000 Korean teenagers stated that they worked without written contracts.

37 000 stated that they were not paid for extra work.

Currently, the minimum wage in Korea is 5,580 won (USD 5.06) an hour.

Claire Lee, Korea Herald, 7 January 2015

Posted by Errol, filed under Culture, Economics, Scams. Date: January 7, 2015, 6:32 am | No Comments »


An aide to Kim Kwang-jin, one of 10 lawmakers who sponsored a bill asking for more than $1.2 million and an official apology from the Korean government for 122 former prostitutes, said police and health centers told the women they were conducting “patriotic acts” with U.S. troops.

The former sex workers who have sued the South Korean government, claimed it encouraged them to become prostitutes after the Korean War. They will have their first court hearing on 18 December 2014.

The 122 elderly women are asking for more than $1.2 million, an official apology from the government and an investigation into the South Korean Government’s overseering of their work.

“This bill is to let people know that the women are victims and the state needs to take responsibility for them,” he said.

Lee Na-young, a sociology professor at Chung-Ang University in Seoul, said Seoul is unlikely to concede that it encouraged prostitution. “South Korea achieved its national security by using women’s bodies and sex,” she said.

Ashley Rowland and Yoo Kyong Chang
Stars and Stripes
Published: December 18, 2014

Park Chung-hee considered such women to be born to a fate of prostitution. It is their fate and the fate of their daughters, and their daughters’ daughters. This Korean caste system continues in modern Korea and is used as an excuse for Korean males and females who are not members of the Korean prostitution caste to justify their ill treatment of the prostitution caste and family members of the prostitution caste. Travelling first class enables these privileged males and females of Korea to behave very badly and engage in nut rage against anybody whom they regard to be a member of an inferior caste.

Posted by Errol, filed under Anti-Americanism, Culture, Economics. Date: December 19, 2014, 2:54 pm | No Comments »


More than 20 female students have stated that a 54-year-old Seoul National University (SNU) professor groped them.

On Thursday SNU announced it would approve the professor’s voluntary resignation letter.

If SNU upholds its decision, the professor will not see a cut in his severance pay or his pension. His records will also be clean and he will be able to apply for employment at other universities. The school’s investigation into the accusations, which is being conducted by the campus human rights center, will also close because he will no longer be a faculty member.

“It will take an exhaustive amount of time for us to decide whether to discipline him or not,” said Kim Byeong-mun, dean of SNU’s academic affairs, adding that the students who are required to take the professor’s courses will suffer in the long run should the probe continue.

But a university official who asked for anonymity calls this a “lame excuse.”

“It’s preposterous to let him go when the investigation is at its peak,” the official said.

The official added that sexual abuse “runs rampant” on Korean campuses.

Lee Sung-eun, Joongang Daily, 29 November 2014

That would be sexual abuse by both Korean professors and Korean students? Korean universities perhaps not the safest place to study for female students from both Korea and abroad?

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, K-girls, Law. Date: November 28, 2014, 10:36 pm | No Comments »

Daegu Dalseo Police Station confirmed yesterday that Yoon, a 54 year old local gang member, had been going from victim to victim, mooching from them and beating them up, police said.

Daegu Police said that Yoon, was arrested yesterday for constantly beating a mentally-disabled man. Authorities said that Yoon told his victim to “get stronger” while committing the abuse.

He was also charged two years ago and released this April for sexually assaulting a mentally-disabled woman in September 2012.

Korea Times, 29 October 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime. Date: October 30, 2014, 3:51 pm | No Comments »

The Office of Jasmine Lee  –  the first non-ethnic Korean and naturalized citizen to become a congresswoman in the Republic of Korea – reported that 10.7 percent of female workers from foreign countries were sexually abused in the Republic of Korea in 2013.

35.5% of the victims were raped.

Almost 90% of the victims said Korean employers or Korean managers abused them.

Claire Lee, Korea Herald, 24 October 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Anti-Americanism, Crime. Date: October 24, 2014, 11:28 pm | No Comments »

A poll by marriage agencies Bien-Aller and Only-U asked 534 single Korean men and women what they feared when it came to potential life partners.

34.5% of Korean men are concerned that potential mates may have been involved in the sex trade, the survey found.

Korea Times 17 October 2014

According to the Korean Ministry of Gender Equality more than 500 000 women worked in the Korean sex industry in 2007. As there are 10 million Korean females between the ages of 13 and 43 in South Korea, that is 1 in 20 Korean women were working in the Korean sex industry in 2007. After the Global Financial Crisis in late 2007 that figure of 500 000 is likely to be much higher.

Korean Government Report on Sex Industry and Prostitution in 2007

According to the Hankyoreh newspaper, there were 120 000 middle school and high school girls living on the streets of Korea in 2012, with 60 000 of them surviving through prostitution. With the slowdown in the Korean economy – as Chinese smartphone manufacturers surpassed Samsung’s sales in China – the number of vulnerable teenage Korean girls is likely to be much higher.

As there are 1.8 million Korean girls between the ages of 13 and 18, about 3.5% of Korean female teenagers resort to prostitution to survive. i.e. One in every classroom.

These prostitution figures do not take into account Korean women who resort to occasional prostitution. e.g. Skipping a semester to work in a room salon to pay credit card debt, skipping a year for a working girl’s holiday in Australia to pay for accumulated college tuition debt and call out services to motels to pay for credit card debts of indigent boyfriends.

The Korean Feminist Association claims that 20% of Korean women either are, or have been, prostitutes.

Thus, between 5% and 20% of the time those 34.5% of Korean males in the survey suspicious of their potential spouses would be correct.

Um Ji-won, Park A-reum and Heo Seung, The Hankyroreh 19 September 2012

The Korean prostitution industry is valued at USD 13 billion per annum and employs 500 000 Korean prostitutes. This means that the 28 000 US service men and women protecting South Korea and the 10 000 English teachers in South Korea have been busy spending an average of USD 35 000 each on Korean prostitutes per year. That’s USD 95 a day for each US soldier, airman, sailor and non-Korean English teacher. i.e 2 Korean prostitutes are bought every 24 hours by every US soldier, airman, sailor and non-Korean English teacher in South Korea.

The US State Department estimates that there were only 200,000 to 300,000 prostitutes working in Thailand in 2008.

US State Department 2008 Human Rights Report: Thailand

Posted by Errol, filed under Culture, K-girls. Date: October 21, 2014, 7:11 am | No Comments »

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