A female private institute teacher was sentenced to eight months jail, suspended for two years, for making love with a male middle school student, 13, according to Incheon District Court on Sunday.

The court also ordered the teacher to serve 120 hours of community service, according to Yonhap news agency.

The teacher, 32, allegedly made love with the student four times between Oct. 9-25, 2015.

The court heard that the teacher and the student became close while sharing the same route home, and that the teacher proposed they have a sexual relationship.

She sent the student suggestive messages such as “Let’s bath together” and “Let’s hug” even before they first had sexual intercourse.

The teacher claimed the sexual intercourse took place with consent and therefore had no grounds for being charged with sexual assault.

“I love my teacher and I don’t want her to be punished,” the student told investigators. “However, I admit I was embarrassed while having sexual intercourse with her.”

The court ruled: “The student was only 13 years old, which makes him unlikely to have proper knowledge about having sexual intercourse.

“Therefore we judged that he did not properly consent to having sexual intercourse with his teacher.”

“The defendant used the student’s lack of sexual knowledge to pleasure herself sexually.

“From a common moral point of view this is viewed as a sexual assault.”

Lee Han-soo, The Korea Times, 28 August 2016

What prevented the Korean police from suggesting to the Korean female teacher that she “settle the case amicably” as a male teacher did in Incheon in 2012? As reported in the article: “Sex abuse against teens rising: report”.

Yoon Min-sik, The Korea Herald, 29 August 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, K-girls, Law. Date: August 30, 2016, 3:27 am | No Comments »

A female gyopo drug trafficker who allegedly has been supplying Korean drug dealers in Seoul and Busan was caught in Los Angeles, police said Tuesday.

The alleged trafficker, 41, known by the codename “Iris,” was arrested in June after a yearlong investigation by Korean prosecutors and investigators from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the U.S. Office of Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO).

She is in custody and will be extradited to Seoul in September.

Korean police said she is suspected of being a ggangpae dumog in the Korean drug supply network because her codename has been mentioned several times in the testimony of drug suppliers caught in Korea.

Hong Dam-young, The Korea Times, 30 August 2016

Posted by Errol, filed under Battle Report, Crime, K-girls, Law. Date: August 30, 2016, 3:00 am | No Comments »

Choi Sung-jin at The Korea Times reports that: “50.8 percent of Korean men have cheated on their wives.”

“Among men who cheated on their wives, those with sexual problems outnumbered those who had no problems.

“Men with sexual dysfunction often do not think it their problem but that of their wife or their poor marital compatibility,” said Kang Dong-woo of the Korean Institute for Sexual and Couple’s Heath. “They think their sexual ability will improve with other women.”

The Korea Times, 1 August 2016

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, finger chopping wacky, K-girls, Law. Date: August 3, 2016, 4:10 am | 2 Comments »

The Supreme Public Prosecutors’ Office said Monday it will investigate an old video showing Samsung Group chairman Lee Kun-hee apparently paying women for sex.

The Samsung Group in a statement last week did not deny that the man in the clips is Lee but added it was a “personal matter” and expressed regret for causing “a stir.”

The Joseon Ilbo, 26 July 2016

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, finger chopping wacky, K-girls, Law, Technology. Date: July 26, 2016, 3:19 am | No Comments »

Culture critic Lee said hwabyeong has its roots in the feudal Korean kingdom that lasted from 1392 to 1897, as its strict class hierarchy and patriarchy offered no social mobility.

“For those who belonged to the lower caste, there really was no way for them to fight injustice if they were abused by those who belonged to the higher class,” he said. “The only way was to just endure it. And we also have to remind ourselves that the slavery system from the Joseon kingdom did not completely disappear in Korea until the 1940s.”

Koreans becoming more prone to rage, Korea Times, 30 March 2016

A U.S. citizen, who was  then 17 years old, said she was raped by a Korean man in Seoul in 2014 when she was on an exchange program at a high school. Unlike Mattner, she decided to stay silent and not tell anyone of her “shameful” experience.

“He was Korean and I am (a) foreigner, so I was scared that I might not win the case. I didn’t want to go through the pain of facing the Korean court system and exposing my rape to my friends and family, for the chance that he might go to jail,” she told The Korea Herald. “I learned that the hard way, but Korea needs to develop better resources when dealing with rape.”

Kim Bo-hwa, a senior researcher from the Korea Sexual Violence Relief Center, said that the ordeal is equally felt among Korean victims due to lack of awareness of sexual crimes here.

“Rape victims here suffer from insensitivity toward them among government officials, lawyers, their families,” she told The Korea Herald.

Korea’s justice system fails foreign victims of rape, Korea Times, 30 March 2016

One of the victims listed in the Korea Times article has a gofundme page.

https://www.gofundme.com/justiceforairdre

 

 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, Law. Date: March 31, 2016, 4:17 am | No Comments »

7:13 p.m.: Cho was sexually molested by a family friend from age five to 12. “I had a very long-term relationship with this abuser, which is a horrible thing to say. I didn’t even understand it was abuse, because I was too young to know,” she says. “I endured it so many times, especially because I was alone a lot.” At 14, she was raped by another acquaintance. “I was raped continuously through my teenage years, and I didn’t know how to stop it. It was also an era where young girls were being sexualized. For me, I think I had been sexually abused so much in my life that it was hard for me to let go of anger, forgive or understand what happened.”

7:14 p.m.: She looks over at Moraga, who is texting on his cell phone. “I guess we can play that song now,” she says to him. “I hope I can remember the lyrics.”

7:15 p.m.: The song, entitled “I Want to Kill My Rapist,” is from her new album. Cho starts singing: “I want to kill my rapist, I want to kill my rapist,” repeatedly to me while Andy strums an acoustic guitar. The rest of the lyrics elaborate on this theme and are occasionally funny, but it comes from a real and dark place. She continues, “I thought I forgave you, but I’d mistake you. I’ll shake you and I’ll bake you. You better run now while I’m having fun now. Here comes the sun now, and you’ll be done now. I see clearly and sincerely, you’ll pay dearly…”

7:22 p.m.: Cho admits that her abuser is still alive and her family knows about it. She says that sexual molestation is an excusable offense in her traditional Korean family’s eyes, which she thinks is insane. Her family believes that people shouldn’t make a fuss about things that have happened to them in the past. “They don’t really want to talk about it, because that would make it real somehow. I think Asian culture often is in denial about such things. Like, if they don’t talk about it, it doesn’t exist. So it makes me unwelcome in some ways,” she says. “But all I have is ownership of my own suffering. I can take that and explain it in a way that helps resolve it. But I often think, ‘How do I have sanity? How do I bring justice?’ I kind of save myself through it. ”

 

Danielle Bacher , Billboard, 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, K-girls. Date: September 7, 2015, 2:45 am | No Comments »

South Korea’s Constitutional Court threw out a decades-old anti-adultery law on Thursday, reflecting a growing importance of personal choice over marital order in a traditionally group-oriented society.

In a 7-2 decision, the nine-member bench ruled that Article 241 of the criminal code was unconstitutional.

“The anti-cheating law has been traditionally aimed at punishing women, but those days are long gone now,” Song Jae-ryong, a sociology professor at Kyung Hee University, said.

Others said the law was practically non-existent, as it had lost its effectiveness in preventing infidelity.

“The anti-adultery law is no longer achieving its purpose,” Kim Jeong-beom, a law professor at Hangyang University, said. “Penalties have become extremely light and don’t have the preventative effect they’re supposed to have.”

Kim Min-soo, an office worker, said. “It’s not like the ruling would make people feel freer to cheat than before.”

Love cheats are already rampant and adultery is institutionalised in a country where people don’t marry for romantic love but for jeong.

Park Sojung, Yonhap News, 26 February 2015

 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, Economics, K-girls, Law. Date: February 26, 2015, 4:38 pm | No Comments »

 

Kim’s label Oscar Entertainment released a statement on Friday saying that the singer was irritated before boarding a Korean Air flight.

“Kim drank some wine on the flight after he got distressed by Korean Air,” the agency said. According to Kim’s agency, Kim thinks he is always entitled to upgrade his economy class seat to a business class seat as he is a male Korean celebrity but Korean Air failed to do so by mistake.

“He does not exactly remember what mistakes he made,” it added.

The mistakes Bobby Kim made were forcibly cuddling a flight attendant, touching her arms and then loudly and aggressively verbally abusing her for about an hour.

Ock Hyun-ju, 9 January 2015, The Korea Herald

Stories of entitled minor Korean celebrities taking out their frustrations on hapless flight attendants are now less likely to be hushed up after the Nut Rage Incident of 2014. The soju defence is a common theme of these incidents. Is this the beginning of the end of the Modern Era of Yangban?

Even though Korean Air flight attendants are hosts and hostesses, an aircraft cabin is not a host or hostess bar for inebriated ajumma and ajeossi.

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, finger chopping wacky, Law, Scams, Science. Date: January 10, 2015, 4:00 am | No Comments »

 

More than 20 female students have stated that a 54-year-old Seoul National University (SNU) professor groped them.

On Thursday SNU announced it would approve the professor’s voluntary resignation letter.

If SNU upholds its decision, the professor will not see a cut in his severance pay or his pension. His records will also be clean and he will be able to apply for employment at other universities. The school’s investigation into the accusations, which is being conducted by the campus human rights center, will also close because he will no longer be a faculty member.

“It will take an exhaustive amount of time for us to decide whether to discipline him or not,” said Kim Byeong-mun, dean of SNU’s academic affairs, adding that the students who are required to take the professor’s courses will suffer in the long run should the probe continue.

But a university official who asked for anonymity calls this a “lame excuse.”

“It’s preposterous to let him go when the investigation is at its peak,” the official said.

The official added that sexual abuse “runs rampant” on Korean campuses.

Lee Sung-eun, Joongang Daily, 29 November 2014

That would be sexual abuse by both Korean professors and Korean students? Korean universities perhaps not the safest place to study for female students from both Korea and abroad?

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, K-girls, Law. Date: November 28, 2014, 10:36 pm | No Comments »

Daegu Dalseo Police Station confirmed yesterday that Yoon, a 54 year old local gang member, had been going from victim to victim, mooching from them and beating them up, police said.

Daegu Police said that Yoon, was arrested yesterday for constantly beating a mentally-disabled man. Authorities said that Yoon told his victim to “get stronger” while committing the abuse.

He was also charged two years ago and released this April for sexually assaulting a mentally-disabled woman in September 2012.

Korea Times, 29 October 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime. Date: October 30, 2014, 3:51 pm | No Comments »

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