Choi Sung-jin at The Korea Times reports that: “50.8 percent of Korean men have cheated on their wives.”

“Among men who cheated on their wives, those with sexual problems outnumbered those who had no problems.

“Men with sexual dysfunction often do not think it their problem but that of their wife or their poor marital compatibility,” said Kang Dong-woo of the Korean Institute for Sexual and Couple’s Heath. “They think their sexual ability will improve with other women.”

The Korea Times, 1 August 2016

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, finger chopping wacky, K-girls, Law. Date: August 3, 2016, 4:10 am | 1 Comment »

The Supreme Public Prosecutors’ Office said Monday it will investigate an old video showing Samsung Group chairman Lee Kun-hee apparently paying women for sex.

The Samsung Group in a statement last week did not deny that the man in the clips is Lee but added it was a “personal matter” and expressed regret for causing “a stir.”

The Joseon Ilbo, 26 July 2016

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, finger chopping wacky, K-girls, Law, Technology. Date: July 26, 2016, 3:19 am | No Comments »

From a Donga Ilbo editorial

“Some talk about the rise of “alpha girls” but those alpha girls are held back by these discriminative policies at work. They seem to still have a long way to struggle.”

“Ms. Lee, who works at a public agency under a municipal government, filed a complaint to the National Human Rights Commission after being refused of application for family allowance to support her mother. Her workplace had a policy of granting allowance to first sons who do not live parents but only to first daughters in the same situation who had no siblings. Ms. Lee was supporting her family and a younger brother in school. The commission saw the case as “violation of equal rights” and advised the agency to revise the policy. They saw it as a clear discrimination against women based on conventional perception of sex, which puts all burden of supporting immediate ascendants to men’s shoulders.”

Regarding this, Ms Lee’s employer stated that most Korea government agencies favour Korean men.

Donga Ilbo 6 July 2016

Posted by Errol, filed under Culture, finger chopping wacky, K-girls, Law, Politics. Date: July 6, 2016, 12:49 am | No Comments »

Culture critic Lee said hwabyeong has its roots in the feudal Korean kingdom that lasted from 1392 to 1897, as its strict class hierarchy and patriarchy offered no social mobility.

“For those who belonged to the lower caste, there really was no way for them to fight injustice if they were abused by those who belonged to the higher class,” he said. “The only way was to just endure it. And we also have to remind ourselves that the slavery system from the Joseon kingdom did not completely disappear in Korea until the 1940s.”

Koreans becoming more prone to rage, Korea Times, 30 March 2016

A U.S. citizen, who was  then 17 years old, said she was raped by a Korean man in Seoul in 2014 when she was on an exchange program at a high school. Unlike Mattner, she decided to stay silent and not tell anyone of her “shameful” experience.

“He was Korean and I am (a) foreigner, so I was scared that I might not win the case. I didn’t want to go through the pain of facing the Korean court system and exposing my rape to my friends and family, for the chance that he might go to jail,” she told The Korea Herald. “I learned that the hard way, but Korea needs to develop better resources when dealing with rape.”

Kim Bo-hwa, a senior researcher from the Korea Sexual Violence Relief Center, said that the ordeal is equally felt among Korean victims due to lack of awareness of sexual crimes here.

“Rape victims here suffer from insensitivity toward them among government officials, lawyers, their families,” she told The Korea Herald.

Korea’s justice system fails foreign victims of rape, Korea Times, 30 March 2016

One of the victims listed in the Korea Times article has a gofundme page.

https://www.gofundme.com/justiceforairdre

 

 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, Law. Date: March 31, 2016, 4:17 am | No Comments »

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Jay expected fried chicken – what he got was an avalanche of lawyers’ letters.

Then in the midst of all this, a less-than-enthusiastic review of Jinjuu by Fay Maschler, veteran critic for the London Evening Standard, is removed from the paper’s website. As a restaurant critic of some years’ standing, I can say that’s unusual. I am told that Joo wrote a letter of complaint about the review, which was forwarded to the Evening Standard. Will Gore, deputy managing editor of the Evening Standard, said the review had been taken down while Joo’s complaint was investigated. “I’ve now gone back to her to try and find a final resolution to the debate,” Gore said.

As I understand it, the letter is basically a long complaint that Maschler doesn’t appear to understand Korean food; that, for example, Korean fried chicken is meant to have a hard batter coating like hers does. Perhaps. It seems to me that this merely proves “authentic” really is not the same as “good”.

Jay Rayner, Observer Magazine, Sunday 26 April 2015

 

Posted by Errol, filed under Culture, finger chopping wacky, Funny, K-girls, Law. Date: May 3, 2015, 5:12 am | 1 Comment »

South Korea’s Constitutional Court threw out a decades-old anti-adultery law on Thursday, reflecting a growing importance of personal choice over marital order in a traditionally group-oriented society.

In a 7-2 decision, the nine-member bench ruled that Article 241 of the criminal code was unconstitutional.

“The anti-cheating law has been traditionally aimed at punishing women, but those days are long gone now,” Song Jae-ryong, a sociology professor at Kyung Hee University, said.

Others said the law was practically non-existent, as it had lost its effectiveness in preventing infidelity.

“The anti-adultery law is no longer achieving its purpose,” Kim Jeong-beom, a law professor at Hangyang University, said. “Penalties have become extremely light and don’t have the preventative effect they’re supposed to have.”

Kim Min-soo, an office worker, said. “It’s not like the ruling would make people feel freer to cheat than before.”

Love cheats are already rampant and adultery is institutionalised in a country where people don’t marry for romantic love but for jeong.

Park Sojung, Yonhap News, 26 February 2015

 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, Economics, K-girls, Law. Date: February 26, 2015, 4:38 pm | No Comments »

 

Kim’s label Oscar Entertainment released a statement on Friday saying that the singer was irritated before boarding a Korean Air flight.

“Kim drank some wine on the flight after he got distressed by Korean Air,” the agency said. According to Kim’s agency, Kim thinks he is always entitled to upgrade his economy class seat to a business class seat as he is a male Korean celebrity but Korean Air failed to do so by mistake.

“He does not exactly remember what mistakes he made,” it added.

The mistakes Bobby Kim made were forcibly cuddling a flight attendant, touching her arms and then loudly and aggressively verbally abusing her for about an hour.

Ock Hyun-ju, 9 January 2015, The Korea Herald

Stories of entitled minor Korean celebrities taking out their frustrations on hapless flight attendants are now less likely to be hushed up after the Nut Rage Incident of 2014. The soju defence is a common theme of these incidents. Is this the beginning of the end of the Modern Era of Yangban?

Even though Korean Air flight attendants are hosts and hostesses, an aircraft cabin is not a host or hostess bar for inebriated ajumma and ajeossi.

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, finger chopping wacky, Law, Scams, Science. Date: January 10, 2015, 4:00 am | No Comments »

 

More than 20 female students have stated that a 54-year-old Seoul National University (SNU) professor groped them.

On Thursday SNU announced it would approve the professor’s voluntary resignation letter.

If SNU upholds its decision, the professor will not see a cut in his severance pay or his pension. His records will also be clean and he will be able to apply for employment at other universities. The school’s investigation into the accusations, which is being conducted by the campus human rights center, will also close because he will no longer be a faculty member.

“It will take an exhaustive amount of time for us to decide whether to discipline him or not,” said Kim Byeong-mun, dean of SNU’s academic affairs, adding that the students who are required to take the professor’s courses will suffer in the long run should the probe continue.

But a university official who asked for anonymity calls this a “lame excuse.”

“It’s preposterous to let him go when the investigation is at its peak,” the official said.

The official added that sexual abuse “runs rampant” on Korean campuses.

Lee Sung-eun, Joongang Daily, 29 November 2014

That would be sexual abuse by both Korean professors and Korean students? Korean universities perhaps not the safest place to study for female students from both Korea and abroad?

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, K-girls, Law. Date: November 28, 2014, 10:36 pm | No Comments »

The number of teenage victims of sex crimes went from 7,893 in 2011 to 8,808 in 2012 and 9,721 in 2013, according to police data revealed by Rep. Lee Cheol-woo of the Saenuri Party. Most victims were female, but the number of male victims was 506, marking a 75 percent increase from two years earlier.

“Considering that most teenage victims are reluctant to report such incidents to the authorities, it can be assumed that the problem (of sexual abuse among teens) is even graver than the numbers suggest,” Rep. Lee said.

Many of the sex crimes in schools are not properly dealt with, due to the victims’ unwillingness to report the case or lenient punishment of perpetrators.

In 2012, an elementary school teacher in Incheon was found to have physically and sexually abused his second-grade students. The case prompted public furor when it was revealed that the school asked the parents to settle the case amicably, saying the male teacher could not work at another school if they declined its request.

Yoon Min-sik, The Korea Herald, 29 August 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Law. Date: August 29, 2014, 8:55 pm | No Comments »

According to the Seoul Metropolitan Police, the number of sex crimes targeting foreigners increased around three-fold from 76 in 2009 to 213 last year.

That is a sex crime against a non-Korean every 42 hours.

 

The Chosun Ilbo, 24 August 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Law. Date: August 27, 2014, 10:10 pm | No Comments »

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