More than 20 female students have stated that a 54-year-old Seoul National University (SNU) professor groped them.

On Thursday SNU announced it would approve the professor’s voluntary resignation letter.

If SNU upholds its decision, the professor will not see a cut in his severance pay or his pension. His records will also be clean and he will be able to apply for employment at other universities. The school’s investigation into the accusations, which is being conducted by the campus human rights center, will also close because he will no longer be a faculty member.

“It will take an exhaustive amount of time for us to decide whether to discipline him or not,” said Kim Byeong-mun, dean of SNU’s academic affairs, adding that the students who are required to take the professor’s courses will suffer in the long run should the probe continue.

But a university official who asked for anonymity calls this a “lame excuse.”

“It’s preposterous to let him go when the investigation is at its peak,” the official said.

The official added that sexual abuse “runs rampant” on Korean campuses.

Lee Sung-eun, Joongang Daily, 29 November 2014

That would be sexual abuse by both Korean professors and Korean students? Korean universities perhaps not the safest place to study for female students from both Korea and abroad?

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, K-girls, Law. Date: November 28, 2014, 10:36 pm | No Comments »

The number of teenage victims of sex crimes went from 7,893 in 2011 to 8,808 in 2012 and 9,721 in 2013, according to police data revealed by Rep. Lee Cheol-woo of the Saenuri Party. Most victims were female, but the number of male victims was 506, marking a 75 percent increase from two years earlier.

“Considering that most teenage victims are reluctant to report such incidents to the authorities, it can be assumed that the problem (of sexual abuse among teens) is even graver than the numbers suggest,” Rep. Lee said.

Many of the sex crimes in schools are not properly dealt with, due to the victims’ unwillingness to report the case or lenient punishment of perpetrators.

In 2012, an elementary school teacher in Incheon was found to have physically and sexually abused his second-grade students. The case prompted public furor when it was revealed that the school asked the parents to settle the case amicably, saying the male teacher could not work at another school if they declined its request.

Yoon Min-sik, The Korea Herald, 29 August 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Law. Date: August 29, 2014, 8:55 pm | No Comments »

According to the Seoul Metropolitan Police, the number of sex crimes targeting foreigners increased around three-fold from 76 in 2009 to 213 last year.

That is a sex crime against a non-Korean every 42 hours.

 

The Chosun Ilbo, 24 August 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Law. Date: August 27, 2014, 10:10 pm | No Comments »

From 2009 to June of 2014, 108 teachers committed sexual misconduct against minors according to the Education Ministry data compiled by Rep. Min Hyun-joo of the ruling Saenuri Pary.

The teachers, while not officially prosecuted, were punished by the disciplinary committees of local education offices.

While the number of sexual abuse cases on children or teenagers by teachers increased from nine in 2009 to 29 in 2013, 30.5 percent of those disciplined retained their teaching posts.

Many of the sexual abuse cases involving teachers are settled out of court, with the perpetrators only facing disciplinary action from schools or local education authorities.

Yoon Min-sik, The Korea Herald, 24 August 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Law. Date: August 27, 2014, 9:52 pm | No Comments »

“According to a study titled Alcohol Effects On Performance Monitoring and Adjustment: Affect Modulation and Impairment of Evaluative Cognitive Control, alcohol doesn’t limit our ability to know what’s right and wrong, instead, it takes away our capacity to care.”

Livia Gamble, The Sydney Morning Herald, 17 August 2014

Although alcohol is not used a defence for sexual crimes in Australia, it is enabled in Korea as part of Clause 10 of the Criminal Law of Korea, as noted in the following article in The Korea Herald from 2010.

“Alcohol is generously accepted as a necessary evil. In Korea, it is also a reason for lighter punishment for some crimes, especially sexual violence. A gruesome case of child rape has recently prompted Koreans to wonder whether such long-standing leniency should stay.

The nation was shocked after it was learned last month that a 57-year-old man raped 8-year-old child, leaving her sexually disabled and having to rely on a colostomy bag due to her missing organs.

The repeat sexual offender, named Cho Doo-soon, was given a sentence commutation for temporary mental disorder caused by drunkenness

Clause 10 of the present criminal law states that those who lack legal capacity due to mental disorder are to be given a commuted sentence and is largely applied to sexual violence cases committed while intoxicated.”

Bae Hyun-jung. The Korea Herald, 30 March 2010

Hmm02-300x245

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Culture, Law. Date: August 18, 2014, 6:18 am | No Comments »

1207111103271873

The Supreme Court of the Republic of Korea, under presiding judge Lee Sang-hoon, on 6 July 2014 upheld  lower court verdicts against a 57 year old monk’s six-year prison sentence for rape and murder.

The monk from the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism, was convicted for raping and inflicting fatal injuries with a wooden instrument on a woman, 20.

The monk was also sentenced for raping and beating another woman to “exorcise all the ghosts from her body”.

After assaulting the women, the monk bound their hands and legs and kept them in solitary confinement.

The monk claimed the sex was consensual, a claim that the court rejected.

Jung Min-ho, The Korea Times, 6 July 2014

 

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Law. Date: July 6, 2014, 5:54 am | No Comments »

According to data compiled by the Ministry of Security and Public Administration, the number of residents from outside the country came to 1.57 million as of Jan. 1, up 8.6 percent from a year ago and taking up 3.1 percent of the nation’s population of 51 million.

It marks the eighth consecutive year that the figure has risen on-year. The government started compiling related data in 2006.

Foreign residents refer to people staying in South Korea for longer than 90 days, naturalized South Korean citizens, marriage migrants and their children.

The ministry attributed this year’s growth to eased requirements for an Overseas Korean (F-4) visa and an increase in applications for permanent residency among ethnic Koreans with non-South Korean citizenship.

Of the foreign residents, nearly 539,000, or 34.4 percent of the total, are workers from abroad with no South Korean nationality.

Korea Herald 2 July 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Economics, Law, Politics. Date: July 2, 2014, 1:20 am | No Comments »

Park Jin-young 02

42-year-old Park Jin-young married in October 2013 the second daughter of Yoo Byung-ho, the recently arrested younger brother of fugitive ferry owner Yoo Byung-eun.

As Park’s 62-year-old father-in-law is a key leader of the Salvation Sect cult, the prosecution is set to widen the scope of its probe into JYP Entertainment as part of its effort to verify a variety of charges against  73-year-old Yoo Byung-eun.

While investigators are looking into JYP’s bank accounts in coordination with the Financial Supervisory Service, some market insiders raised the possibility that the prosecution will soon summon Park.

Park has recently argued that he and his parents are not devotees of the Salvation Sect cult and he was paid nothing from the religious group.

JYP Entertainment agency also claimed that it has made no business partnership or cross-funding transactions with sister firms of Chonghaejin Marine Co., the operator of the tragic Sewol.

Meanwhile, foreign investors and corporate investors have continued to dump their stake in JYP Entertainment on the secondary KOSDAQ over the past few weeks.

While its closing price was 6,080 won ($5.96) per share on April 15, a day before the ferry tragedy, it has ranged between 4,200 won and 5,500 won won since. Foreigners’ shareholding ratio in the company has dropped to 0.42 percent, from 1.0 percent in early May.

By Kim Yon-se Korea Herald Canada Day 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Economics, Law. Date: July 2, 2014, 1:10 am | No Comments »

25f8fcbd-46d1-4a3f-9ce3-5de588ad5b09-460x276

New South Wales Fire and Rescue Commissioner Greg Mullins said firefighters were shocked to find young Japanese and Korean men cohabiting at a Sydney industrial site when they were called to the large inner-city blaze in the early hours of the morning.

The group were reportedly in their late teens and early 20s and from Japan and South Korea, although a New South Wales police spokeswoman could not confirm their identities.

“When (firefighters) arrived they thought they had a normal industrial fire, but within a couple of minutes it became a rescue operation,” Mullins told reporters.

“They were living in squalor. There were beds in old minibuses, a shipping container and an old caravan with a massive fire moving towards them.

“The firefighters had to shield the people from the heat to get them to safety. They were too frightened to move. There were 20-metre flames.”

AFP July 2, 2014

Posted by Errol, filed under Crime, Law. Date: July 2, 2014, 12:03 am | 1 Comment »

June 24,2014

The Seoul Family Court on Sunday ruled in favor of a Philippine woman and her two sons in a paternity suit against the children’s South Korean father, officially acknowledging their biological connection.

The court accepted the blood relationship between the Korean man and his Kopino children – a term that refers to a child born out of wedlock to a Philippine mother and a Korean father – based on DNA test results and the boys’ birth certificates.

The ruling is the first of its kind here and is likely to have broader implications for the tens of thousands of abandoned Kopino children who exist outside the country.

Kopino children, also called “Korinoy” in Filipino slang, are mostly born between Philippine women and Korean men who travel to Southeast Asia for business or study.

The majority of Kopino children are neglected or abandoned by their fathers, a trend that has resulted in the use of the term “ugly Korean” by locals, and left the mothers of the babies with few options. The Philippines is a predominantly Catholic country and abortion there is illegal.

In the paternity suit, the Seoul Family Court’s Judge Kwon Yang-hee concluded that the Philippine woman’s 16-year-old and 14-year-old sons were the biological children of the Korean defendant.

The names of all parties in the suit were withheld for privacy.

The Korean man was already married and had two children in Korea when he moved alone to the Philippines in 1997 for business, where he cohabited with the woman for seven years and fathered the two boys. In 2004, however, he abruptly returned to Korea and severed all contact.

But the woman flew to Korea with the man’s picture and name, and managed to locate him in 2012. With assistance from the Emergency Support Center for Migrant Women, she filed a paternity suit for her children in December the same year.

The defendant initially refused DNA testing, arguing that it would destroy his family in Korea, but relented under the threat of a court-ordered injunction and fine. Once the ruling is finalized, the plaintiffs will be entitled to child support. The children will also be included on the man’s official family register.

According to civic groups, the number of Kopino children has increased rapidly in recent years, making it an issue of growing concern. The exact number of Kopino children is difficult to pinpoint, but Ecpat International, a global network of organizations dedicated to protecting children, estimates that there are about 30,000.

BY SHIM SAE-ROM, KIM BONG-MOON [[email protected]]

http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/Article.aspx?aid=2991044

—-

Sometimes Korean officialdom does get something right!

Posted by Dokdodevil, filed under Law. Date: June 25, 2014, 7:23 pm | No Comments »

« Previous Entries