The Japanese newspaper, “San-in Chuo Shimpo,” has posted a new article on Takeshima (Dokdo). You can find the article at the following link:

竹島問題で韓国側主張覆す古地図見つかる

Here is a draft translation of the article:

Both Japan and South Korea claim Takeshima (Korean name: Dokdo) as their territory, but old Korean maps have been found that refute Korea’s claim. They were submitted on the eve of “Takeshima Day,” which is February 22nd, by Mr. Gerry Bevers, an American who studies the Takeshima problem in South Korea.

Mr. Bevers draws attention to the fact that before 1905, the year Japan annexed Takeshima into the Shimane prefecture, the name “Dokdo” was not found in any Korean documents or on any Korean maps. South Korea claims that is because the name for Dokdo in the old documents and on the old maps was “Usando.”

Mr. Bevers, however, has submitted copies of three old maps stored in Seoul National University’s “Gyujanggak” museum that refute South Korea’s claim. The maps are of the Korean island of Ulleungdo, which is ninety-two kilometers northwest of Takeshima.

One of the maps, which is undated, shows a small island east of Ulleungdo with the following written on it: “The so-called Usando, fields of Haejangjuk.” It is pointed out that Haejangjuk is a kind of bamboo that cannot grow on Takeshima, which is essentially just a cluster of rocks where bamboo does not grow.

The map, dated 1834, has a graduated scale of ten Korean ri (one Korean ri equals 0.4 kilometers). It shows a small island labeled as “Usan,” which refers to Usando, situated about four kilometers east of Ulleungdo. That means the island is not Takeshima, but is Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of “Jukseo” (Jukdo).

Takashi Tsukamoto at the National Diet Library [of Japan], who is familir with the Takeshima problem said, “[Mr. Bevers’ claim] contains a new dicovery based on an investigation that a resident in South Korean can carry out. The map with “fields of haejangjuk” (海長竹田) on it is especially important in that it can prove that Usan was not Takeshima/Dokto.”

Mr. Bevers intially questioned the anti-Japanese feelings in Korea that was triggered by the establishment of Takeshima Day and began his study of Takeshima/Dokto. He publishes the results of his study on the Internet.

Here are the two maps shown in the article with links to my posts explaining them:

Link to an Explanation of the Above Map

Link to Explanation of the Above Map

UPDATE: Here is a link to a Korean-language article talking about the article in the Japanese newspaper.

Medical Today: ‘독도는 한국땅’ 뒤집는 옛 문서 발견…교도통신

Links to More Posts on Takeshima/Dokdo (With Japanese translations)

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7

Posted by Gerry-Bevers, filed under Verus Historia. Date: February 21, 2007, 7:04 am | 54 Comments »

54 Responses

  1. ponta Says:

    Can anyone tell me what the writing means on the five small islets drawn off what looks to be the southern shore of Ulleungdo on this Japanese map on Opp’s Web site?

    I think on the five islands is written the same
    letters:シマ,meaning island. It is the way 島 is read.

  2. pacifist Says:

    As ponta wrote, the Chinese charcter written on all the tiny islands is “island” (シマ or 島), except the northest one 間島 (Manoshima).

  3. Aki Says:

    Gerry,

    I happened to find that Web page by just googling with “まの竹”. Since there is a common bamboo species called “Shino (しの)” in Japan, I thought that there could be a bamboo called “Mano (まの)”. I don’t know whether any Japanese historian has ever disccussed about the linkage between the Mano island and the Mano bamboo.

    By the way, I found a description about “Mano” in my Japanese-Japanese dictionary, 日本国語大辞典. The “Mano” which is written as “真箆” in Chinese character is a bamboo species used to make shafts of arrows. It is also used for making shafts of writing brushes. Bamboos thinner than “Mano” is called “Shino” that I mentioned above.

    The bamboo for making arrows is called “Yadake (矢竹)” in present Japanese. Its scientific name is Pseudosasa japonica. Its appearance is similar to Pleioblastus simonii, isn’t it?

  4. Dokdo Museum Head Admits Maps Show “Jukdo, not Dokdo” » Occidentalism Says:

    […] Japan’s Kyoto News  Agency and Tottori Prefecture’s “San-in Chuo Simpo” have recently reported, “Old Korean maps have been discovered that refute Korea’s territorial claims on Dokdo.” The “San-in Chuo Simpo” reported on its Web site on the 22nd of last month that American Gerry Bevers (51), who works as an English professor at a college in Seoul and studies the Dokdo problem, had contributed old maps that refuted Korea’s territory claims on Dokdo. [See article here and my post on the article here.] […]