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94-Yr Old US Vet Talks Post-War Japan

November 10th, 2006 . by Gerry-Bevers

The following five YouTube video clips were made by a 94-year-old, retired US Army colonel named Leslie (Les) Buzzwell Loken, who talks about some of his experiences in both World War II and post-war Japan. Even at ninety-four, Les is quite acticulate, and his stories are both interesting and even emotionally moving when he talks about a 50-year-plus friendship with a former enemy.

94-year-old Vet Talks about Japan, Part 1

94-year-old Vet Talks about Japan, Part 2

94-year-old Vet Talks about Japan, Part 3

94-year-old Vet Talks about Japan, Part 4

94-year-old Vet Talks about Japan, Part 5


40 Responses to “94-Yr Old US Vet Talks Post-War Japan”

  1. comment number 1 by: ponta

    .
    Hereis friendship between ex-American pow and Japanese.
    For instance, he says

    We have learned that war brings hatred, suffering, destruction, and waste and that peace can bring happiness and prosperity. Let us each teach this to our sons and daughters.

    She related seeing one of my crew parachute into the field in front of her house. Her father grabbed his rifle and proceeded toward the “soldier” as did other farmers. He was bitter about his son having been killed by the Americans and intended to shoot the “soldier.” Instead the “soldier” shot her father and killed him.

    The dauther says

    “I didn’t bear a grudge against the Americans. It was my honest feeling.” Your letter “was guided to the tomb of father. I don’t hate American. Father should have run away early from enemy who had a pistol.

    Yes the war brings about the hatred, but I think good fighters show respects to the ex-enemy when the battle is over just as the fighters in Judo, Karate, Sumo salutes each other after the battle..

  2. comment number 2 by: ponta

    sorry for poor spelling and grammar (and other mistakes in this comment and other comments on other threads)
    dauther→daughter

    .

  3. comment number 3 by: smackout

    I think in order to have a better understanding of the horrors of war its important to learn exactly what happened and why, many Koreans I have spoken to don’t actually know anything about why the pacific war started in the first place, and I also have spoken to many Japanese who have no idea about some of the things that happened in the South Pacific, I.e the POW’s and the Burma railway, im sure they know it was built but by whom? It reminds me of a documentary I watched only a few weeks back on the Australian ABC, it was presenting the memories of both a Japanese guard and also of an Australian and British POW who both were present on the Burma project. Many times the Japanese solider said he boar no grudge against the Australians, and vice versa but it was interesting to see that his recollections of what happened and that of the Australian/ British are completely different. He was quite positive that on one of the mountain passes built that no POW’s were involved, however the POWS quite vividly remember building this. The Japanese solider presented a picture from a book showing the Japanese soldiers working on this section and pointed out that there are no Australian/British at all in this photo, the documentary producers actually found the original copy of this photo and the pictures of the Australian troops were actually cut out of the photo before it was published. I guess what I really want to say is that people can really believe totally different things about the same incidents and im quite sure in their minds they are right. Education on the pacific war seems to be lacking alot in Asian countries. I guess if you really want to know you can use the internet but shouldn’t their be a program of education that is universally standard so we have a mutual understanding and get on with things whilst at the same time the whole truth is known>?

  4. comment number 4 by: tomato

    smackout,

    You know, the belief that the Japanese youth are taught nothing about the war is surprising. Of course they are taught. And I’ve never heard of any credible Japanese person denying using POWs to build the Thai-Burma bridge! Nagisa Ohshima, a Japanese, directed a movie about the tragedy that happened. And of course there is mention of the Bataan death march in Japense history textbooks.

    I guess Korean propaganda has gotten too far. Of course, not everyone in Japan knows much about the war, but focusing only on the ignorant is unfair, becuase there will always be ignorant people in any country. Does every Australian know about the war? Or Americans?

    And the story about Japan white-washing history books is just nuts…this is one of the crap that the Koreans like to tell everyone. Uniform idea of history is crazy if you tell me…why should non-Koreans accept the Mansei history of Koreans?

  5. comment number 5 by: smackout

    And I’ve never heard of any credible Japanese person denying using POWs to build the Thai-Burma bridge!

    Tomato- i think u missed the point here, I wasnt refering to the whole railway im speaking of a passage way that was built, and the point is that people’ perception of history is very different im not saying that they are hiding anything. Moreover i did not state that Japanese youth are taught nothing, im speaking from my experience and the people i talk to, im niether Japanese nor Korean but i have heard so many strange stories from both of them regarding events some so fantasically that i can only wonder where they came from. As i said i think in order to forget and move on the only way to respect and remember is to come to a mutual agreement as to the exact events.

    And the story about Japan white-washing history books is just nuts…this is one of the crap that the Koreans like to tell everyone

    I dont understand your point here? Australian television program about Australian/British soliders what does this point have to do with Koreans? i will follow up and find the name of this documentary. This were memories of Australian soliders. Actually if memory serves me correctly i think the Japanese solider being interviewed in this doco was an army engineer..

  6. comment number 6 by: ponta

    the point is that people’ perception of history is very different

    That is the point. If you read two or three books on the same subject of history, you will know there are completely different perspectives. So I am not sure if there is “a program of education that is universally standard” and by which “the whole truth is known.”
    I think the best we can do is to present different perspectives and as many sources as possible and educate students to constitute the most convincing story on their own.
    The worst history education that we should avoid is that as a result of learning it, you are brainwashed to hate a specific national, leaving students uncritical of what was taught.

  7. comment number 7 by: kojibomb

    I guess Korean propaganda has gotten too far. Of course, not everyone in Japan knows much about the war, but focusing only on the ignorant is unfair, becuase there will always be ignorant people in any country. Does every Australian know about the war? Or Americans?

    true… I don’t know what Koreans want Japanese schools to teach their students more about WWII. Comfort women??? which may be all made-up story according to many scholars even some Koreans yes! Koreans too think that… ummm forced labor… which many people already know about… so… what? In America, only thing I learned about WWII was… what happened in Europe and Pearl harbor stuff, ummmm bombing hiroshima…. kamikaze…. toratoratora…. that’s about it.

    But… I guess what Koreans are demanding is that Japan has to teach more about WWII since it’s a part of history which Japan should nv make that same mistake again…

    But… we don’t really learn that much about native indians… and what we did to them. maybe in some in elementary school but I wasn’t even interested in it… just making models of its villages… extremely fun…

    I guess… Koreans have a point that it will be good for Japan to teach more but… they should not push it because the govt of the country choose what to and what not to teach and they prob know what’s better for themselves more than foreigners anyway.

    Uniform idea of history is crazy if you tell me…why should non-Koreans accept the Mansei history of Koreans?

    They shouldn’t… it will only encourage them to cont teaching little kids to hate Japan. I m fine with them teaching how great Korea was in the history because….. I always thought having strong nationalism is cool. Japan should teach children to have strong nationalism than right now. Many Japanese lack of love for their country. I hope Grand national party would gain power in SK again… since that’s going to help relationship with other nations to get better esp Japan and America… and they are going to do… sth *wink to all the educators brainwashing their kids about how evil Japan and America is….

    o.. I heard Roh is having affair with some African gentlements…. great… SK is allied with bunch of developing countries now….

  8. comment number 8 by: ponta

    But… I guess what Koreans are demanding is that Japan has to teach more about WWII since it’s a part of history which Japan should nv make that same mistake again…I guess… Koreans have a point that it will be good for Japan to teach more but… they should not push it because the govt of the country choose what to and what not to teach and they prob know what’s better for themselves more than foreigners anyway.

    It is good to teach the misery of the war, the atrocity that the man caused,
    And i think it is necessary for Japanese to know the facts. But knowing them does not prevent the war ,the atrocity ,take place.

    Korea knows what it means to participate in the war. They participated in WWⅡ, siding with Imperial Japan. And yet they they participated in Vietnam and killed civilians. They have never apologized. Worse yet, the fact is not taught at Korean school.

    Korea knows what it means to kill the political dissidents from the experience of the colonization. And yet they killed a million of dissidents after the colonization. Worse yet, it seems most young Koreans are not taught the facts.

    Korea knows what it means for poor women to be exploited as comfort women from the experience of the colonization. And yet Korean women have been exploited by the pimps in the same way with a greater numbers after the colonization. Worse yet, while they demand more apology from Japan, the facts are hidden from the Korean students.

    South Korea knows how terribly North Korea distorts the history. And yet South Korea holds Sun Shine Policy towards North Korea.

    What should be noticed here is the recent demand from Korea and China on Japan facing history is purely political. It seems history for them is nothing but a political tool.

  9. comment number 9 by: treesjess

    If Koreans are wasting their energy on always worrying about Japan. Koreans should use their energy on making their country better. Koreans should brainwash their students that the garbage goes in the garbage can. If they can brainwash their students to hate, then they can brainwash their students to stop littering!

    Do Koreans know how the world sees their country? Do Koreans also know that they are very disrespectful and are terrible drivers?

    Do Koreans know they have a high corruption rate?

    Koreans, put the garbage in the garbage can. That is more important then focusing on other countries. Work on improving your own country first!

  10. comment number 10 by: smackout

    How did this debate on memoirs of the Pacific War turn into Korean Bashing?

  11. comment number 11 by: tomato

    How did this debate on memoirs of the Pacific War turn into Korean Bashing?

    Well, you kind of suggested denial by the Japanese of their warcrimes, and the Koreans are the noisiest ones alleging this “Japanese revisionism”…so it’s not a long shot to assume that the allegation of Japan being “unapologetic” comes from Korea and is spreading all around the globe.

  12. comment number 12 by: smackout

    denial by the Japanese of their warcrimes,

    Did i say that? Please find me the sentance where i said that?
    Japan not apologetic dont think i said that either, talk about jumping to conclusions…But then again you know what they say about being too defnsive??!

  13. comment number 13 by: ponta

    smackout

    How did this debate on memoirs of the Pacific War turn into Korean Bashing?

    How?
    smackout said

    As i said i think in order to forget and move on the only way to respect and remember is to come to a mutual agreement as to the exact events

    kojibomb said

    I guess what Koreans are demanding is that Japan has to teach more about WWII since it’s a part of history which Japan should nv make that same mistake again…

    Ponta said,

    1)Knowing what happen does not prevent it from happening again, taking some examples of South Korea

    2)Without exactly knowing what happened , or with knowing what happened, we “can” move on , get along just as between Japan and the US, or between South Korea and North Korea.
    (US Vets are the examples in point)

    And I want to say more,

    3) Putting history the first priority in political scheme is just disguised form of taking hegemony.

    4)After the friendship treaty with Japan , South Korea could have emphasized the bright side of the colonization, It does not means we forget the dark side of it but South Korea could have admitted the it had bright side so that South Korea and Japan could move on. That was their choice.

    In case of North Korea, South Korea totally forget the dark side and chose to focus on the bright side.

    This IS incredible power of South Korean generosity. Facing the present apparent evil, with nasty history with North Korea, South Korea can look at the bright side of North Korea.

    In case of Japan, South Korea made up groundless nasty history. That is also incredible Korean talent of imagination.

    5)Korean bashing? If this is Korean “bashing”, I don’t know any English word
    for what is going on in Korea about Japan………super-bashing? …any suggestion?

  14. comment number 14 by: smackout

    My point was actually toward an a more common understanding of events in relation to the Pacific War..You know its a bit of a childish attitude to say “oh well mum he started it”! come on ..what is going on in Korea about Japan, my friend do two wrongs ever make a right?

  15. comment number 15 by: ponta

    smackout
    Who suggested ” two wrongs ever make a right.?
    You call it –whatever it is, —Korean bashing , I don’t . And I don’t think it is Korean bashing. I am stating facts to draw the conclusion that the agreement in interpretation is not necessary condition for two countries to move on.

  16. comment number 16 by: tomato

    My point was actually toward an a more common understanding of events in relation to the Pacific War..You know its a bit of a childish attitude to say “oh well mum he started it”! come on ..what is going on in Korea about Japan, my friend do two wrongs ever make a right?

    Why should there be common understanding?

  17. comment number 17 by: tomato

    The Japanese solider presented a picture from a book showing the Japanese soldiers working on this section and pointed out that there are no Australian/British at all in this photo, the documentary producers actually found the original copy of this photo and the pictures of the Australian troops were actually cut out of the photo before it was published. I guess what I really want to say is that people can really believe totally different things about the same incidents and im quite sure in their minds they are right. Education on the pacific war seems to be lacking alot in Asian countries.

    Well, I think you did suggest that the Asians (which probably means Japanese in the above) aren’t taught history well enough, or even resort to cutting out photos to deny things that happened…

  18. comment number 18 by: smackout

    Why should there be common understanding?

    Are you really serious? It is a widely understood fact that in order to move on from the past you cant just ignore what happened or there will be a continuing resentment. Tomato i can sense from your attitude you are Japanese right? im sory if you take my comments personally but it is the truth we all strive for.

  19. comment number 19 by: ponta

    smackout

    Are you really serious? It is a widely understood fact that in order to move on from the past you cant just ignore what happened or there will be a continuing resentment

    Striving for the truth is all right, but to move on ,the agreement in interpretation is not necessary .
    For instance, as to nuking Japan, there is no mutual understanding between Japan and the US. And there is no agreement as to the evaluation of it even among American historians. And yet we ARE moving on. My grandfather was a civilian and he was a victim of Tokyo airaid, he survived though. I don’t think many young Americans knows Tokyo airaid. That is no problem. My grandfather had no resentment I have no resentment. I have no reason to have resentment. I admire the US. We can move on.

    I am not sure if Japan and Taiwan have mutual understanding and yet we are moving on. I love Taiwan. I hear, happily, many Taiwanese like Japan. And surprisingly, many old Koreans who directly experienced the colonization do not have resentment.

    There is a committee consisting of Japanese and Korean historians on history They have long debates, they never agree. Do we have to wait until they agree to move on?

    The resentment after many apologies and compensation continues only if you are kept being brainwashed to hate and hate and hate in the culture of “han”. Do you think South Korea and North Korea have mutual understanding on Korean war? I don’t think they have and yet, they are trying to move on. Young South Koreans do not have resentment toward North Korea!

    Having wider and deeper perspective on historical events is very important, and to give justice to the deads ,that is necessary. But to move on for the future, the mutual understanding the past is not always necessary. Moving on for the future is more important . And I believe the will to move on comes first to better understand the past, to have mutual understanding of the past. I hope Korea will move on.
    Do Romeo and Juliet need the mutual understanding of what their fathers has done to each other to move on?Do they keep holding resentment against each other unless they have mutual understanding of what their fathers did?

  20. comment number 20 by: tomato

    Are you really serious? It is a widely understood fact that in order to move on from the past you cant just ignore what happened or there will be a continuing resentment. Tomato i can sense from your attitude you are Japanese right? im sory if you take my comments personally but it is the truth we all strive for.

    Like I said, you’re comments do suggest that the Japanese aren’t living up to their past. And I utterly refute that. Like, how long has Japan not been involved in a military conflict? Answer: Ever since the end of WWII. And do you know how much Japan offered assistance to S Korea, China, and Southeast Asian countries, both monetary and technologically? And still the Koreans and the Chinese are calling Japan to be ” militaristic”. Don’t you see the politics here?

    Where is the suffering now? In S Korea? Among the Chinese ruler class in Beijing or Shanghai? I think we hould worry more about the people who are being oppressed right at this moment than worry about some old soldier from a long gone era who doesn’t remember things well.

  21. comment number 21 by: smackout

    I think we hould worry more about the people who are being oppressed right at this moment than worry about some old soldier from a long gone era who doesn’t remember things well.

    It is fine to dirvert the attention to other things but i think this argument runs far deeper than an old man who cant remember! You have done a good job to trivialize the argument…

  22. comment number 22 by: tomato

    It is fine to dirvert the attention to other things but i think this argument runs far deeper than an old man who cant remember! You have done a good job to trivialize the argument…

    If you like to belive Japan and its people are not living up to its past, that’s OK. It just shows how you don’t really care about post war developments and power plays between the countries going on right now Just don’t try to hide such intent and pretend that you are neutral.

    .

  23. comment number 23 by: tomato

    BTW, I don’t like to point out war atrocities on the side of the allies because I think modern day US, UK and Australia, etc. are all fair and decent countries sharing ideals of political freedom and human rights, but when B-29s came to destroy Tokyo with incendiary bombs kiling 100,000 people in a single night, American pilots 30,000 ft above in the sky reportedly smelled the burning of human flesh. And the atomic bombs…humans, also mostly civilians, burned and melted down alive…were these justifiable? If so, why does the US resort to pinpoint bombing rather than nuke the enemy to oblivion? Or use incendary bombs filled with napalm?

    If you start having those kind of arguments, the hatred and despair will be reborn again. It’s Pandora’s Box. It’s really no good…a nightmare. And still, Japan has acknowledged its wartime atrocities and compensated quite handsomely. Yes, some blurts do come out from Japan about justifying the Pacific War,but still, Japan has never officially renounced the historical view of the former allies. If you think that’s not enough, there’s nothnig more I can say…

  24. comment number 24 by: ponta

    Sorry I posted in the wrong place

  25. comment number 25 by: smackout

    BTW, I don’t like to point out war atrocities on the side of the allies

    Missing the point again…Agreed their were atrocities on both sides, i will reiterate my argument, TheTokyo air raids are commonly taught in western countries we all know, my point is education.

  26. comment number 26 by: dogbert

    Japan needed to give up its war far earlier than it did, rather than displaying such stubborn willfulness in the face of certain and overwhelming defeat. Had it done so, many lives would have been spared.

  27. comment number 27 by: smackout

    Well said Dogbert, pride can only get you so far

  28. comment number 28 by: ponta

    TheTokyo air raids are commonly taught in western countries we all know, my point is education.

    But many students do not know anything about it. The situation is similar ererywhere.

    Japan needed to give up its war far earlier than it did, rather than displaying such stubborn willfulness in the face of certain and overwhelming defeatHad it done so, many lives would have been spared.

    I agree. But that does not justify the killing of innocent people.

  29. comment number 29 by: dogbert

    I believe that is called “collateral damage” in a situation of war.

  30. comment number 30 by: smackout

    I agree. But that does not justify the killing of innocent people.

    Of course nothing justities the killing of people, but whose to blame the Japanese Govt had the opportunity to save those lives, but sent them to their death.

  31. comment number 31 by: ponta

    I believe that is called “collateral damage” in a situation of war.

    Whatever it is called, it does not justfiy the killing women and childre.in my opinion.

    (1) “I suppose if I had lost the war, I would have been tried as a war criminal. Fortunately we were on the winning side.”

    This remark, made years after World War II, is attributed to Gen. Curtis LeMay (1906-90), a U.S. Air Force commander who directed a massive incendiary attack on Tokyo in the predawn hours of March 10, 1945, scorching a good portion of the city’s eastern shitamachi, a low-lying area with many small independent shops and factories.link

    and then the secret of defenceyou tube

  32. comment number 32 by: smackout

    Of course the U.S is to blame but repsonsibility ultimately lies with the Japanese agression and refusal to surrender.

  33. comment number 33 by: nigelboy

    I believe that is called “collateral damage” in a situation of war.

    It’s also illegal.

    “of course, in Japan we were all aware of the bombings and the burning of Tokyo and Yokohama and other big cities. It was horrible that we went there for the purpose of vindicating the laws of war, and yet saw every day how the Allies had violated them dreadfully……” IMTFE Justice B. V. A. Rölling, Netherlands.

  34. comment number 34 by: nigelboy

    Of course nothing justities the killing of people, but whose to blame the Japanese Govt had the opportunity to save those lives, but sent them to their death.

    Hindsight is 20/20.

    If Hull/Roosevelt compromised with Japan, there would have been no Pacific war to begin with.

  35. comment number 35 by: smackout

    If Hull/Roosevelt compromised with Japan, there would have been no Pacific war to begin with.

    The anwser was definetly not war….No matter how long negotiations would have taken, outright aggression was uncalled for and as you have stated sent many Japanese to their ultimate death..

  36. comment number 36 by: nigelboy

    The anwser was definetly not war….No matter how long negotiations would have taken, outright aggression was uncalled for and as you have stated sent many Japanese to their ultimate death..

    “Chief Justice Webb of Australia later went on to state that if U.S./ Britain were subject to the same Economic sanctions/ restrictions, they too may have no choice but to declare war.(“Japan’s Imperial Conspiracy”, David Bergamini)”

  37. comment number 37 by: ponta

    Of course the U.S is to blame but repsonsibility ultimately lies with the Japanese agression and refusal to surrender.

    repsonsibility ultimately lies with the Japanese agression

    The buck stops here, Truman.
    The responsibility lies with the imperialist wold of the time.
    Joking aside.
    Japanese soldiers committed war crimes. They were executed.
    Japanese expansionism is not formidable just as the European countries’ invasion of Asia is unformidable.
    Japanese society was filled with terrorism, and militarist leaders were mad:.they were to be blamed. Japanese leader were also to be blamed for
    the death of Japanese people in Tokyo, Yokohama, Hiroshima etc.But Is that all there is to WWⅡ?.That is the problem here.
    Smackout, we can discuss for ever. I don’t know how much you know about it. I don’t know if you are talking about the Hull note, knowing what proposals were made by Japan’s side.. I have read several books, As for the air raid, my conclusion so far is the air raid itself was necessary, but the way it was done had gone further than was necessary. And we can talk about the nuke too. .My position is that Truman was wrong. I might change my opinion if I found the further counterarguments.

    But the point here is whether Japan needs mutual understanding with the US to move on without resentment. You say yes, I say, no, though it is good to discuss it.
    I have no resentment about the US though I have the opinion above and I know most Americans are not interested in the issue in question..
    I admire Americans and I think most Japanese feel the same
    But here we found the disagreement. You say we can not move on without resentment. I say we can move on despite the difference in interpretation of history. That is the point here Let’s stay on the subject.

  38. comment number 38 by: dogbert

    It seems to me that the Japanese of the time were in some respects similar to the Koreans of today — extremely ethnocentric, intolerant of dissent, unsupported belief in their own superiority, slavish devotion to superiors, and quite stubborn. They needed to be taught a lesson and they were.

    Saying that Japan had no choice but to go to war (due to sanctions) would be true if the Japanese were rational actors. But we can see that they were not — otherwise they would have ended the war far sooner than they did.

    Further, while the Koreans and Chinese are prone to hyperbole, we do know that the Japanese were extremely cruel and prone to abuse non-Japanese. In contrast, when the allies occupied Japan, they made it a point not to act vengefully or harmfully to the Japanese people. No one could have expected victorious Japanese to have acted in the same way.

    In the post World War II period, the Japanese have charmed many Westerners with their Hello Kitty, their Pokemon, their Playstations, and other claptrap to such an extent that many of us have forgotten that the Japanese were an extremely cruel and violent people. I for one do not buy it and I do not accept arguments based on moral equivalency against Alllied conduct in World War II.

  39. comment number 39 by: ponta

    It seems to me that the Japanese of the time were in some respects similar to the Koreans of today

    In some sense, yes, In another sense no.

    Saying that Japan had no choice but to go to war (due to sanctions) would be true if the Japanese were rational actors. But we can see that they were not — otherwise they would have ended the war far sooner than they did

    Okay so first you think the decision to go to war was rational choice.Though I disagree, that is okay.

    But what makes you think that the Japanese were not rational because “otherwise they would have ended the war far sooner than they did”
    I agree the decison not to end the war was not rational.But what makes you think that the Japanese were not rational? Do you means individual leader like Anami,,Hirohito made the irrational decision or the system of decision making or constitution?or the Japanese in general? Or do you think just because LeMay a U.S. Air Force commander made the wrong decision, the Americans were irrational actors?

    we do know that the Japanese were extremely cruel and prone to abuse non-Japanese. In contrast, when the allies occupied Japan, they made it a point not to act vengefully or harmfully to the Japanese people. No one could have expected victorious Japanese to have acted in the same way

    Japan abused other Japanese also And I agree no one expected japanese to have acted in the same way.But note, for instance,1326 rapes by American soldiers are reported to GHQ in Kanagawa prefecture alone.Is that you call not act vegefully or harmfully?

    In the post World War II period, the Japanese have charmed many Westerners with their Hello Kitty, their Pokemon, their Playstations, and other claptrap to such an extent that many of us have forgotten that the Japanese were an extremely cruel and violent people

    I don’t ming buying Americans products though I know some Americans committed war crimes. Do you think because some nationals at sometimes acted in a specific way, all the national always act in the same same way ?

    I for one do not buy it

    As you please.
    And I don’t buy Hell Kitty anyway. But do you not buy it as a protest against the wrongful acts that Japan did?

    and I do not accept arguments based on moral equivalency against Alllied conduct in World War II.

    As you please.

  40. comment number 40 by: GarlicBreath

    Dogbert

    You make some interesting comments. You are a real authority on Korea, so thank you for all your insight. I want to make one comment about your comparison of Korea and Imperial Japan. I think a better comparison is Korea of today and Germany in 1930. I base my comparing on this.

    Koreans focus on:

    Pure blood
    cult of victimhood
    racial superiority over brown and black people
    grandiose (false) vision of their history
    propaganda
    racial finger pointing (at japan)
    national mastabatory glee when given any acknowledgment (88 olympics)

    The list goes on.

    The grinning Banki moon is the posterboy for the Korean “National Socialism”