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Crisis of Journalistic Integrity in the Korean Media

September 3rd, 2005 . by Matt

As we saw in the ‘Japanese Repentence Marathon?‘ post, the Korean media can be extremely dishonest. Of course, this was not an isolated incident, but a pattern which has continued for a long time. Now we have another instance of the Korean media making things up, this time courtesy of commenter ‘Nakashima’ that wanted to show that I was one sided by not reporting that Japanese tourists intentionally defaced a Korean nationalist monument in Russia.

From the comments section –

Nakashima Said:

August 29, 2005 at 12:26 am

Such harsh generalizations. I’ve come into contact with quite a few Korean-American communities, and all seemed to have be sociable and considerate. My best friend dated a Korean girl for a couple of years, and her family seemed completely accepting. The owner of this site has a tendency to take a single incident and generalize the entire race. In any case, I’m sure we won’t be hearing about the intentional defacing of the word “Korea” by Japanese tourists in Russia.

The article describing ‘the intentional defacing of the word “Korea” by Japanese tourists’ is here. Lets take a look at the picture and text.

defaced

The word “Korea” was intentionally defaced on a memorial to independence activist Ahn Jung-geun in the town of Kraskino in Russia’s Maritime Province. A local resident by the name of Vladimir testifies, “Recently, Japanese people who visited Kraskino took a chisel to the four places on the memorial where it said ‘Korea.’” The monument commemorates 11 Korean nationalists who cut off one of their fingers as a sign of loyalty to their fatherland immediately before Ahn’s assassination of former Japanese prime minister Ito Hirobumi in Harbin. It was erected in 2001 by the Korea Restoration Society and the Koryo Academic and Cultural Foundation./Yonhap

According to this ‘Vladimir’, the monument was defaced by Japanese tourists. Of course, no Japanese tourists have been arrested for the crime.

On the Chinese version of Choson Ilbo, we see a completely different story.

据确认,在俄罗斯沿海州克拉斯基诺(Kraskino,旧称“延秋下里”)建立的安重根义士断指同盟遗址的纪念石碑被严重损坏。

在该石碑背面用俄语书写的碑文中,写有“韩国”的部分被人用利器凿掉。当地居民弗拉基米尔说:“2年前就变成这样了。”石碑正面留有疑似被石头砸伤的100余处伤痕,可以说整个石碑满目疮痍。

安重根义士在哈尔滨火车站击毙伊藤博文前的1909年2月7日,在该村落与11名同志一起展开太极旗,并切断左手无名指,建立了“断指同盟”。 该纪念石碑是光复会和高丽学术文化财团于2001年建立的。

I placed the relevant text in bold. In this case, the only thing Vladimir said was “It was like this from two years ago”. Why does the text disagree with the english version? The Chinese text does not mention Japanese tourists.

Lets look at the Korean version. The Korean version uses a different picture.

defaced

러시아 연해주 크라스키노(옛 이름 연추하리)에 세워진 안중근(安重根) 의사의 단지(斷指) 동맹 유지(遺址) 비석이 심하게 훼손된 사실이 최근 확인됐다.

이 비석의 뒷면에 러시아어로 씌어진 비문 중에서 ‘한국(Κорея)’이라 쓰여진 부분들만 예리한 도구로 깎여나갔다.〈사진〉 현지 주민 블라디미르씨는 “2년 전부터 이렇게 돼 있었다” 고 말했다. 비석 앞면 역시 돌멩이를 던져 생긴 것으로 보이는 100여곳의 흠집들로 만신창이가 돼 있다.

안중근 의사는 하얼빈 의거 직전인 1909년 2월 7일 이 마을에서 11명의 동지와 함께 태극기를 펼쳐놓고 왼손 무명지를 자른 ‘단지동맹’을 맺었다. 기념비는 광복회와 고려학술문화재단이 지난 2001년 세운 것이다.

Again, the relevant text is in bold. Here “Vladimir’ says the same thing as the Chinese version, that “”It was like this from two years ago”.

Now lets look at the Japanese version of the Choson Ilbo (it uses the same picture as the Korean version).

安重根義士記念碑に傷

 ロシア沿海州・クラスキノ(韓国での旧称は煙秋(ヨンチュ)下里)に建てられた安重根(アン・ジュングン)義士の「断指同盟」記念碑に深刻な傷がつけられていたことが最近、確認された。

 同碑石の裏面にロシア語で書かれた碑文中、「韓国(Κорея)」と書かれた箇所だけ鋭利なもので削り取られていた。

 現地住民ウラディミルさんは、「2年前からこうなっていた」と話した。

 碑石前面も同様に、石をぶつけたものとみられる100か所余りの傷が全体的にできていた。< 写真右側>

 安重根義士は、ハルピン事件直前の1909年2月7日、この村で11人の同士と共に太極旗を広げ、左手の薬指を切って「断指同盟」を結んだ。

 記念碑は光復会と高麗(コリョ)学術文化財団が2001年に建てたものだ。

朝鮮日報

Relevant text in bold again. Says that “It was like this from two years ago”.

Obviously the authenticity of this article is extremely suspect. Given the reporting about the ‘Peace Run’, I am inclined to think the worst.

When reading or watching the Korean media, its a good idea to make sure that you have double checked the facts first before believing. Will the Choson Ilbo be printing a retraction and apology?


27 Responses to “Crisis of Journalistic Integrity in the Korean Media”

  1. comment number 1 by: tk

    I think that the Choson Ilbo has ‘intentionally’ written “Recently, Japanese people who visited Kraskino took a chisel to the four places on the memorial where it said ‘Korea.’ ” in English version.

    Korean version ;입력 : 2005.08.26 18:31 08′ / 수정 : 2005.08.27 02:41 42′
    “It was like this from two years ago”.

    Chinese version  ;刊登: 2005.08.26 17:37
    “It was like this from two years ago”.

    English Version   ;Updated Aug.26,2005 19:17 KST
    “Recently, Japanese people who visited Kraskino took a chisel to the four places on the memorial where it said ‘Korea.’

    Japanese Version   ;記事入力2005/08/28/ 12:30
    “It was like this from two years ago”.

    http://bbs.enjoykorea.jp/jphoto/read.php?id=enjoyjapan_13&nid=54172&work=list&st=&sw=&cp=1

  2. comment number 2 by: tk

    If you see ‘UPDATE TIME’, you will think so,too!

  3. comment number 3 by: dogbert

    Not only that, I can see the word “Korea” just below that guy’s finger. So obviously not all apperances of the word on the stele were defaced.

  4. comment number 4 by: ponta

    This reminds me of the report of a fisherman who got caught by Japanese Coast Guard..
    http://jetiranger.tripod.com/BLOG/index.blog?entry_id=1124548
    http://hiroko111.accela.jp/kimuchi.html
    The photo above: The fisherman on the ship was in good shape.
    The photo below; he was injured for no reason in the hospital.

  5. comment number 5 by: Katz

    “This reminds me of the report of a fisherman who got caught by Japanese Coast Guard..
    http://jetiranger.tripod.com/BLOG/index.blog?entry_id=1124548
    http://hiroko111.accela.jp/kimuchi.html
    The photo above: The fisherman on the ship was in good shape.
    The photo below; he was injured for no reason in the hospital.”

    Nothing like using this topic to defame even more my country, right? I don’t see any european, chinese or american who could do that besides japanese. What is this compared to what YOU do? I think this site serves this same purpose: using Korea to hide their wrongs.

  6. comment number 6 by: Larken

    Funny how they change the english version, somehow like they want white people to know about this.

  7. comment number 7 by: ponta

    katz
    Thanks for your comment.
    It seems your reaction sounds a bit funny.
    Faking a story is wrong.
    Faking a story to fuel nationalism is worse.
    Criticising what is wrong is right.

    In Japan recently Asahi newspaper was accused of faking a data.
    http://www.asahi.com/english/Herald-asahi/TKY200508300118.html
    Japanese people criticized Asahi harshly, and I think they are right, The reporter was fired.

    In Korea, recently MBC was accused of faking a data.
    http://www.independent.co.kr/news/n_view.html?kind=rank_code&keys=2&id=9129
    The korean readers seems to criticize MBC and I think they are right.

    This incident and other incidents that Matts and I presented show that Korean media sometimes fakes stories to fuel nationalism. Don’t let nationalism fueled by those media.

    Some Korean tend to equate an individual with his/her nationality,a ciriticism with an insult,but we need to make a clear distinction between an individual and his/her nationality and between a criticism and an insult.

    Do not think just because I did this, all Japanese do this.
    Do not think just because a Korean media was criticized, all Korean people are insulted.

    Patriotism is important. And I think to be open to criticism is not inconsistent with patriotism; I think it is a part of patriotism.

  8. comment number 8 by: Gerry Bevers

    Yes, the Korean media is generally very good at stretching and embellishing the truth and at ignoring those nasty little facts that do not corroborate the story they want to tell. But the biggest problem in Korea is that there is rarely any opposing views when it comes to negative stories about Japan. The few Koreans who do dare to speak up in defense of Japan often suffer the consequences, as Kim Wan-seop, the author of “In Defense of the New Pro-Japanese,” recently found out.

    Not only has Mr. Kim been ridiculed and ostracized in Korean society for his pro-Japanese book, but now, on September 2, a Korean court has ordered Mr. Kim to pay 96 million won in damages to relatives of King Kojong, Queen Min, and others, whom he supposedly defamed in his book. Last year, Mr. Kim had to pay 7 million won for defaming Korean independence fighters.

    Mr. Kim did not attend any of the court proceedings, which the court judged to be an admission of guilt. The article does not say, but the last I heard was that Mr. Kim is now living in Australia, which may be why he did not attend the court proceedings. He may be afraid to return to Korea since criminal charges have also been filed against him.

    The article says that Mr. Kim has sold 400,000 copies of his book in Japan, and that the Korean court is considering attaching the royalties Mr. Kim is receiving from Japanese publishers to pay the damages.

    The KBS News story is here.

  9. comment number 9 by: Matt

    Not only has Mr. Kim been ridiculed and ostracized in Korean society for his pro-Japanese book, but now, on September 2, a Korean court has ordered Mr. Kim to pay 96 million won in damages to relatives of King Kojong, Queen Min, and others, whom he supposedly defamed in his book. Last year, Mr. Kim had to pay 7 million won for defaming Korean independence fighters.

    Without freedom of speech, democracy is impossible. Its terrible what they are doing to him.

    Mr. Kim did not attend any of the court proceedings, which the court judged to be an admission of guilt. The article does not say, but the last I heard was that Mr. Kim is now living in Australia, which may be why he did not attend the court proceedings. He may be afraid to return to Korea since criminal charges have also been filed against him.

    I read the Japanese edition of his book. I also heard he is in Sydney, where I happen to live. If I can, I will try to get an interview with him.

  10. comment number 10 by: ponta

    I’ve heard a famous Korean singer, a politician and even a professor were ostracized because they wrote something in favour of Japan.(Correct me if I am wrong) Sad—not because the opinions of pro-Japan were ignored, but because democracy is at crisis. Opposing views are so precious in a democratic society. What are Korean intellectuals doing on this matter? Even those intellectuals who are anti-Japan must have interests in opposing to oppressing the opinions if they value democracy, freedom to speech more than nationalism.

    I wonder why Mr.Kim didn’t send a lawyer to the court. If he really loves his nation, he should have let people know what he thought of this issue. It might be that no lawyer wants to help him for fear that s/he will be ridiculed in Korean society. In that case, what can I say?

  11. comment number 11 by: nou

    “Not only has Mr. Kim been ridiculed and ostracized in Korean society for his pro-Japanese book, but now, on September 2, a Korean court has ordered Mr. Kim to pay 96 million won in damages to relatives of King Kojong, Queen Min, and others, whom he supposedly defamed in his book. Last year, Mr. Kim had to pay 7 million won for defaming Korean independence fighters.”

    i neither heard his book nor read it so i can’t make any judgement. but i can think out two possibilities.

    1. if he merely suggested a new perspective of seeing the hisory:

    then the punishment is against the freedom of speech. korean court must reconsider its ruling.

    2. if he distorted established facts and fabricated the history:

    then he should be punished. distorting fact and freedom of speech should be seperated. there are quite a lot of people who have been punished in europe for that matter. they are called ‘holocaust deniers’ or ‘collaborators’. Mr Le Pen in France got hefty fine because of his inappropriate remark on the Nazi rule of France. he maynot be able to go to presidential election because now mayors are refusing to write recommendation letters for him.
    those who glorify the atrocities should be punished without pity.

  12. comment number 12 by: Matt

    2. if he distorted established facts and fabricated the history:

    then he should be punished. distorting fact and freedom of speech should be seperated. there are quite a lot of people who have been punished in europe for that matter. they are called ‘holocaust deniers’ or ‘collaborators’

    Nou, the French laws are not good laws at all. The problem with the French laws is that even if someone tells the truth, based on facts, they can still be charged. Indeed, telling the truth in France can cause people to be convicted, like when animial rights activist Brigitte Bardot told the factual truth when describing the Muslim ritual sacrifice of sheep. For this reason the French laws should not be emulated by other countries.

    Further, I think you do not grasp the concept of ‘free speech’. If no speech were offensive, then there would be no need to talk about the need for free speech. People are offended by all kinds of speech. Sometimes the people that are offended are are wrong, and the person using the ‘offensive speech’ is right. Who decides if he ‘distorted established facts and fabricated the history’? The Korean government? A judge that is not a historian? Anti Japanese Korean civic groups? The normal process to discredit scholarly works that have errors is to do so in journals and on the internet, where the errors are exposed. However, I have seen no such exposure on the internet, despite all the media attention he was been recieving. Therefore one can think that they have no counter argument, and are attacking him to stop his free speech.

  13. comment number 13 by: nou

    i understood what you said. but even in democratic countries, absolute freedom of speech can not be tolerated because there are people who try to impose their unjustifiable ideas on others. for example, advocating Nazi in Germany is prohibited because diffusing unjustifiable and dangerous ideas is more harmful to society than limiting freedom of speech.

    for media attention on Mr.Kim, i didn’t know him before reading the comment of Gerry though i monitor korean media everyday. i can say his case doesn’t get much attention.

  14. comment number 14 by: dogbert

    for media attention on Mr.Kim, i didn’t know him before reading the comment of Gerry though i monitor korean media everyday. i can say his case doesn’t get much attention.

    Think for a moment about just why that might be.

  15. comment number 15 by: ponta

    Nou
    Freedom of speech is most valued in democratic society.
    In Japan, censorship is strictly forbidden unlike Korea. The government can not interfere with what should be published. You can say whatever you want to say unless it cause apparent present danger or it cause unrecoverable damage on the person. (BTW, if you don’t understand this , you can’t understand the dipute over a history textbook.)
    In Japan you commit litigation against the dead person only if you intentionally say something in public that is untrue and that defames the dead person. Even in that case, you are not guilty if you prove that you have good and sufficient reason to believe that your story is true.
    .Why?—-because freedom of expression is so priceless in a democratic society that sometimes one’s fame must be valued in the second place..
    In a society where it is easy for the government to censor, all people know is what the government want them to know.
    In a society where the media just presents stories which people wants to believe, all people know is what they want to believe.
    I hear Korea government censored Mr.Min’s book and forbade it to be published in Korea.
    And the Korean media give little attention to this story of censorship.
    Deep sigh.

  16. comment number 16 by: Two Cents

    So nou, are you saying is that while some people cannot be allowed to have freedom of speech since their voice or writing will somehow have supernatural powers to force dangerous ideas on another person, the government should be given the physical power to decide whay may be or may not be presented because they know what is right for its people? For all the wrong the Nazis did, I do not believe that the German law prohibiting pro-Nazi speech goes along with democracy. I do not think the Germans will ever let another Nazi regime take power, even if the advocates were to have freedom of speech. Plus, I am inclined to think that that suppressing pro-Nazism will only make it take a more extreme form and become a magnet for insecure individuals.

    In a democracy, it is ultimately the people who decide the course of its country and it is with the people whom the ultimate responsibility of the outcome lies. Thus, all sorts of ideas and views from different perspectives must be tolerated, even when they are offensive. Although I despise Asahi Shinbun and the sentiment is apparently shared by politicians like Abe Shinzo, I will not give my government the power to control it in any way.

    “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.” – Voltaire
    Heavy words indeed.

  17. comment number 17 by: nou

    dear ponta

    i agree to what you said. i said nothing againt all that. i wonder why you explain that kindly to me.
    for the censorship of Korea, there exist only one censorship which is regarding to the eroticism. it is lamentable that law prohibits to publish something too sexual or erotic. but it is like that for now.

    dear two cents

    “are you saying is that while some people cannot be allowed to have freedom of speech since their voice or writing will somehow have supernatural powers to force dangerous ideas on another person”

    i never said something like supernatural power! there exist people who are vulnerable to believe what they hear. nazism was wrong in any regard in pre-war germany. it was cleary against the democratic values that constitution of Weimar Republic had. unfortunately many people seriously listened to Hitler. do you think nasizm had supernatural power at that time?

    “I do not think the Germans will ever let another Nazi regime take power, even if the advocates were to have freedom of speech.”

    how can you say so confidently? no one can predict the future with a word like ‘ever’. germany has embarassingly more nazi sympathizers than other mature democracies in europe. what will be the situation without the censorship? there were even rockbands which were promoting the nazism to youth and they still exist illegaly. without the government intervention, more youths would have been converted to such idea. would you let more youths become neo-nazis because freedom of speech is absolute?

  18. comment number 18 by: Two Cents

    The supernatural power phrase was sarcasm, actually. Words and voices are only that. Some may convince people more than others, but no idea can be forced onto a person. A person may accept the contents, but that is his decision and his only in a democratic society. No government or authority should be given the power to stop the relay of ideas between people unless the society wants to cease to be a democratic society. And to keep a democratic country running normally, the people owe it to themselves to be “not vulnerable.” However, neither the government nor the people have the right to decide whether others are vulnerable and should be cut off from some ideas.

    If you want to prevent people from supporting another Hitler, you have to understand why the people chose to go along with him and fix that weakness or make sure that the situation is not repeated instead of simply banning the Nazis because the next Hitler may not take the form of a Nazi. Though you are right and I cannot be 100% certain that the Nazis will not make a comeback if legalized, I still think that the chance for them to take the majority and hold power is negligible. Thus, I would be much more comfortable if they existed as a radical minority party, shouting their claims out in the open where they can be scrutinized, criticized, and counter arguments presented. However, Germans have chosen to outlaw them, and so be it. It is their country and it certainly is a practical way of preventing a comeback.

    Sorry for being off topic, Matt.

    2. if he distorted established facts and fabricated the history:

    What is important is for you to read the book and decide for yourself, through research, whether he is the one doing the distorting.

  19. comment number 19 by: nou

    thanks for your opinion, two cents.

    according to my research, there seem to be two types of freedom of speech which are north american and european. i guess you have the american view and i have the european one.

    yes, it is somewhat useless to talk long on that book because no one here has read it.

    to ponta

    i come up with another important censorship in korea which is related to north korea. any book or film containing the political thinking of north korea is not allowed in south korea. i think it’s absurd now because no one’s naive enough to believe it.

  20. comment number 20 by: Two Cents

    I have Kim Wansop’s book and have read it. Only the first one, though. It basically follows the tone of Japanese “right-winger (as alleged by Koreans)” views. He’s a bit harsh on Korea, since he wrote it in the inital stages of “Oh my god I’ve been lied to!”

  21. comment number 21 by: ponta

    Nou
    Thanks for your imformation about censorship.You are very helpful.
    I have some questions.

    1)What is Europian type of freedom to speech? Is it the type of freedom to speech practiced in the communism?

    2)Do you think you can get that book in Korea? —in the libarary for instance.

    3)Do you think there are unreasonable social and political pressures in Korea if you say something in favour of Japan.
    (BTW, in Japan there are a lot of people speaking in defense of South Korea and even Kim in the North.)

  22. comment number 22 by: nou

    you posed interesting questions, ponta.

    1) absolute freedom of political speech is appreciated in america. unlike america, there is some restriction on freedom of speech in europe. certain verbal acts greatly upsetting the public such as being politically incorrect and denying sombre history are banned. some european countries and the european union have the laws limiting the freedom of speech with the above reasons.

    2) you can order the book through a korean online store. i think the book is in some public libraries, too because i read the book review of someone who found the book in a korean library.

    3) Yes, there is a lot. A famous korean singer declared recently he is pro japan and he was criticized by a lot of people. at last he had to cancel what he said. i was quite irritated by these people who were over-reacting to the word ‘japan’. everyone is entitled to have opinion and he didn’t defend the atrocities.

    at the same time people often say that there are many things to learn from japan. such remarks are not bashed.

  23. comment number 23 by: ponta

    Nou
    Thanks..감사
    I’ve heard that Japanese movies had been prohibited in Korea until recently, is that true?
    Eeven in the U.S, and in Japan, there is no absolute right of freedom of speech as I said in a comment above.The problem is, as Two Cents implies, whether the government has right to judege what is righ interpretation of history, what is the ultimate value of life.
    Some interpretation might be worse than the other, but who decides it? The government or people?
    Some purposes people persue might be less useless in view of others..Who dicides? The govenment or people? In a free society, you have right to hold your ideal, you have right to compete your idea with counterarguments against you. And Democratic society is the one where people decide the nation’s policy and rules based on discussion in which freedom of freedom of speech is guaranteed. It seems Voltaire’s spirit is dead in French society.
    I don’t agree to what you called European type of freedom of speech. Nou,what do you think?
    And I don’t understand why there is unreasonable social pressure against pro-Japanese in Korea.
    You don’t have to be pro-Japanese, you can be anti-Japanese, but if the pressue is so strong that you can not say what you believe, it come to be the same thing as there being no freedom of speech.

  24. comment number 24 by: nou

    1) all the japanese pop cultures have been prohibited until recently. japanese songs, movies and games were prohibited during that time. it was reaction from the pervasive japanese cultural influence in korea due to the colonial rule (policy of 內鮮一體). korean people felt threatend to be japanised and the count measure was born.

    in 1990’s korean people became more confident about themselves and opened the door to japanese pop culture.

    2) i will answer you on the freedom of speech in europe when i find some time

    3) the ‘pro-japan’ issue is more emotional than rational in korea. one should know the meaning of pro-japan in korea to understand the overreaction. the korean word pro-japan (親日) has two meanings:

    firstly the word designates collaobrating acitivty by pro-japanese koreans during the colonial rule. they got very rich as reward was given for the collaboration. so pro-japan koreans represent one of the most criticized traitors in korea history.
    secondly the word is used to designate good and positive feeling on today’s japan.

    the two usages of the word are confused by many koreans. many people accept only the first meaning. and pro-japan is unacceptable at any case for some people because they have only bad images of japan from the colonial rule and the extreme right wings.

    it will be hard to change the situation rapidly because the scar from the colonial rule is very deep and history education highlights the japanese atrocities. but the tide is changing little by little. declaring ‘pro-japan’ was almost unimagineable a decade ago. the declaration of the korean singer itself is the proof of progress.

  25. comment number 25 by: ponta

    Nou
    Thanks. I hope the day will come when people like you have a say in Korea without unreasonable pressure..

  26. comment number 26 by: Chris

    Nou,

    Yes, it is true that Japanese movies, music, magazines, comics/manga, TV shows and the like were banned here in South Korea. The Ministry of Culture finally completely removed the hypocritical ban early in 2004. The ban was instituted as far back as the 1950’s (I think). The SK government didn’t want loyal and patriotic Koreans to be brainwashed into preferring Japanese pop culture over Korean pop culture. (Yeah, whatever.) Japanese films were not allowed to be legally shown in movie theatres here in until 2000/2001. (I think that Shunji Iwai’s haunting film “Love Letter” as well as his equally brilliant “April Story” were the first two Japanese films to get a commercial release in here South Korea.) Japanese books, magazines, and manga were allowed to be sold in bookstores sometime shortly after that. It wasn’t until late 2003/ early 2004 that one could go to a music store and buy a Japanese language CD. The final reason for this was probably the fact that South Korean “singer” BoA was enjoying so much success in Japan passing herself off as a J-pop singer. The cultural embargo was finally lifted, so that Koreans could legally buy her CDs. At the time, you couldn’t buy her CDs here in SK!!! Imagine that a SK “singer” more popular in Japan than her own country!!! Cynical? Perhaps. Personally, I love the fact that I can buy Japanese CDs here in South Korea because they are cheaper than those outrageous prices HMV charges in Japan and the fact that Korean music mostly sucks IMHO.

    Chris
    Yongsan Garrison, Seoul


  27. […] I wonder where they got the photo. If it was from the North Korean government, I wonder if they just accept these kinds of things at face value without checking. Considering all the other stuff I have written about, like the lies about Japanese apologies involving a manga artist apology and the so called repentence marathon, the fake grave desecration by Japanese tourists, and the absolutely hysterical Korean media panic about foreign English teachers that might be having sex with Korean girls, I start to wonder what on earth is wrong with the Korean media establishment. […]