Occidentalism
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Dokdo apology cakes?!

September 18th, 2005 . by Matt

Apparently a Japanese woman living in Korea has made some ‘Dokdo apology cakes’ and presented it to Korea on the net.

apology cake
She made some cakes and is very, very sorry to Koreans about events she had nothing to do with

Here are the cakes

cake 2
The flag on the right says ‘Dokdo is Korean territory! I acknowledge that Dokdo is Korean territory!’

Sounds like someone after being persecuted and brainwashed to me…

cake 3

It says –

Apology Letter

Feeling that I want to apologise for Japans lack of guilt about its sins, and recognising that Dokdo is Korean territory, I made these ‘Dokdo apology cakes’ out of apples given to me by my husband. To say again, I am really sorry, really sorry.

From the Japanese representative of people that recognise Dokdo is Korean territory, Iuchi Kinue. (There is a pun in there, if you can find it in the original Korean text)

Thats some pretty heavy abasement.

Apparently this woman went to Korea after marrying a Korean man and works as a Japanese teacher in a Korean school. This Korean article tells us more about her –

My translation, edited for length

On 24/03/2005, at Andong womens middle school, a beautiful scene played out. The protagonist is Japanese conversation teacher, Iuchi Kinue.

Married to a Korean man and having three children, Iuchi sonsengnim has been touched with a special affection for her Korean students, and takes every opportunity to apologise for Japans past acts of aggression, like drafting and comfort women.

A few days ago in the first classes of 2005, Iuchi sonsengnim entered the staff room and after saying good morning to the other teachers, suddenly bowed and said “Dokdo is Korean territory! It is not Japanese! I will apologise instead!”.

Then she put the two cakes she made in the staff rooms center table, and on the cakes was a Korean flag drawn in crayon with a message that said ”Dokdo is Korean territory! I acknowledge that Dokdo is Korean territory!’.

Read the rest by yourself.

It seems to me this is a classic case of Stockholm Syndrome. How could a Japanese living in Korea, much less a Japanese woman living in Korea, not cave in to the relentless pressure from Koreans about Dokdo. The fact that she appeared at work one day and made such a scene probably means Koreans had put her under pressure in a personal sense because of the policies of the Japanese government. Making this kind of declaration is the same as saying, “Now will you please leave me alone?”.

In anycase, this is not the first time Japanese have been forced to apologise to Koreans, and no doubt it wont be the last.


50 Responses to “Dokdo apology cakes?!”

  1. comment number 1 by: dogbert

    One of the comments left on the Korean site told her to “please go home”.

  2. comment number 2 by: tk

    If she has made the cake and written these letters , she may be of The Holy Spirit Association for the Unification of Christianinty (統一協会 통일 교회)

    The entry following has wrtten about the gruop.

    http://bbs.enjoyjapan.jp/jphoto/read.php?id=enjoyjapan_13&nid=54720&work=list&st=&sw=&cp=1

  3. comment number 3 by: Matt

    tk, the link doesnt work.

  4. comment number 4 by: tk

    http://bbs.enjoykorea.jp/jphoto/read.php?id=enjoyjapan_13&nid=54720&work=list&st=&sw=&cp=1

    In this site the link dosent wor but in Japanes site does work!
    I dont Know the reason.
    Anyway, the link is alive, so please directly use the link and go to the site I wrote.

  5. comment number 5 by: Matt

    It works now.

  6. comment number 6 by: tk

    And the site following says that the Japanese women who apology are of The Holy Spirit Association for the Unification of Christianinty (統一協会 통일 교회)

    http://www.mypress.jp/v2_writers/chaosmode_flower/story/?story_id=944660

    朝鮮日報 日本人女性のジョル
    http://japanese.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2005/03/01/20050301000052.html

    (以下引用)
    韓国に滞在する日本人女性60人が1日、京畿(キョンギ)道・議政府(イジョンブ)のペヨン小学校を訪れ、日帝当時苦痛を受けたお年寄りたちに「ジョル」(韓国伝統の礼の仕方)をしている。

    その写真の中に、従姉の顔を探しました。見つけられなくてもホッと出来ることは無かったです。辛い予感を確かめたくて、直接被害者でもない私が行くことをためらいつつ元信者さん(脱会・リハビリ済)の集まる場所にてお聞きしてみました。

  7. comment number 7 by: dogbert

    In other words, she’s a Moonie.

  8. comment number 8 by: mae

    i have never heard an opposit story, although there should be more korean women marry japanese men.
    never heard of apology from any of them saying,”sorry, korean illegally took these islet by force and under their control for 50 years”
    i guess she is one of those naive japanese schools, like if we keep art. 9 of our constitution, no one attacks us.

  9. comment number 9 by: ph@ton

    Hmm….

    I lost my word. It’s a very sad thing if she was forced to it against her will.

    If I had a relative(as a soldier) killing a Korean during Colonial era or WW2, I will
    apologize to the descendant of the killed but never in the way how she apologized.
    Why is that Korean want to think that Japan is the ultimate evil in the whole world?
    Those were extemely hard time for everyone involved and Korean was not the only victims.

    My grandfather died in a factory assebling fighters during the bombing of the city by Americans.
    BUT, I have no grudge against the guy who released the bomb, or to the whole american.
    It was war and that guy simply did what he had to do, it was his duty as a soldier….

    Moreover, dropping of the horrendous A-bomb can not be justified in any way, but the current
    American generation is not responsible for it, and I have absolutely no negative
    feelings to my japanese speaking American friend.
    Why can’t Koreans think in the same way?
    (Yeah, I know.. their education systems, government propaganda and blah blah blah..)
    Sad history can never be forgotten, but past is past and we must move forward.
    Anyway, I think as long as Koreans don’t get over the past, there is no friendship forever.

    (While I tried my best to express my intention, sorry if you had difficulty reading them
    as I have limited english skill.)

  10. comment number 10 by: Curzon

    So what’s the pun in the original Korean?

  11. comment number 11 by: Matt

    So what’s the pun in the original Korean?

    사과 means both apple and apology in Korean. A homonym.

  12. comment number 12 by: CaptPorridge

    My first thought was that this cake making chick was out to score some cash. good idea me thinks!
    But, sadly since she’s a Moonie, the only person making any money is a 80 year old Korean lunatic,
    Still, the idea is good, I might start making my own Dokdo cakes, or at least I could buy cakes and resell them with a Korean flag on them. Maybe include a message like, “Australia believes Dokdo is Korean”

  13. comment number 13 by: ponta

    CaptPorridge
    I couldn’t understand her, either she is either brainwashed, or she had a strong social pressure derectly or indirectly, because she has no reason to apologize even if she is convinced that Dokdo belong to Korean.
    CaptPorridge, your interpretation is superb, she must be a really good salespeson.That makes sense.

  14. comment number 14 by: Yooklid

    Cake doesn’t look to appetizing. Maybe it’s some sort of joke cake?

  15. comment number 15 by: Two Cents

    Cake doesn’t look to appetizing.

    I agree. If someone were to give me a cake like that and said she was sorry, I would be unsure of her intentions. They just look like overdone pancakes to me. Whatever her intentions, I think she shoud have consulted a decent cookbook first. You could make a far more appetizing cake using a rice cooker (although appliance manufacturers strongly oppose the use of rice cookers in that manner).

  16. comment number 16 by: Victor

    You guys are contradicting each other…

    she must be a really good salespeson.

    They just look like overdone pancakes to me.

    A good salesperson wouldn’t mess up with her pencakes!!

  17. comment number 17 by: Two Cents

    Victor,
    Why should all of us agree whether the cake looks tasty or not?
    Capt. and ponta (might) think so, and Yooklid and I definitely don’t.

  18. comment number 18 by: ponta

    Well, I don’t have to be saying that the cake looks tasty.
    Her idea was really good anyway, but she performd badly, Still she is a good salesperson if not the best.

    But in the first place, i don’t think she had such idea, I was kinda kidding.

    She is brainwashed or she had social pressures, but probably this simple story needs complex analysis.I think we need to understand at least,
    how korean see Japanese
    how Korean see the relation between a natinality and an individual
    how “apology function in this society.

    And i don’t have the right answer. So I just evade the issue.

    i

  19. comment number 19 by: Yooklid

    Maybe she should have gone all out and had cakes in the shape of Dokdo?

  20. comment number 20 by: Victor

    thoese pancakes look overcooked, to say the least…..

  21. comment number 21 by: ponta

    Then she was ironical, she wanted to send a message,”Takesima-Dokdo issue taste bad,distasteful ,and overheated in this society.”(^_-)

  22. comment number 22 by: Victor

    Ponta,
    Look at her face…She looks like a genunine person to me.

  23. comment number 23 by: ponta

    Victor,
    Look at me, and reread what I said・・・did I look serious when I said, “she must be a good salesperson, or she was ironical”
    She IS a genuine person, and that person is apologizing on the net.
    That is the problem.

    Okay, suppose there is a territorial issue between Canada and Korea, which is hard to settle. Suppose also that you are convinced that the territory at issue belogs to Canada.Do you feel like apoligizing on the net in Canada?”I want to apologise for Canada’s lack of guilt about its sins, and recognising that Dokdo is Korean territory,・・・・”
    Do Canadian want you to apologize?
    If you apologized, would they think it was beautiful story?

    To understand this story, I think we need to know the atomospher in Korea toward Japanese, and how takesima issue symolize the way Korean perciever Japan-Korea relations.

    What do you think?
    .

  24. comment number 24 by: Victor

    Oh, I see your point…

    In my opinion, the Japanese woman just “played with” the victim mentality of korean people in an utterly genuine way, given that “victims” do need apologies from their aggressors.

  25. comment number 25 by: ponta

    “Vitim mentality”—that’s it.
    I think you can find it in various ways in Korean cuture, MacArthur statue incident, for instance.
    .

  26. comment number 26 by: Victor

    To expand a little further….

    When you live with people who consider themselves as victims, I guess you would feel the need to apologize for their “suffering”, especially if their “suffering” was caused by your native country…. That’s the only logic I could use to figure out her intention behind the apology cakes.

    Had she been motivated by money or recognition, she wouldn’t have used such cheesy-looking pancakes.

  27. comment number 27 by: Matt

    Had she been motivated by money or recognition, she wouldn’t have used such cheesy-looking pancakes.

    I think its more of a cross between pancakes and apple pie, which would account for their shape.

  28. comment number 28 by: Chris

    Konnichwa. This is the first time I have written anything on your BBS, so here it goes….

    In my opinion, this story says a lot about what is going on in South Korea today. The woman had good intentions. However, she doesn’t have to apologize for anything. I’m sure that she was humiliated on a daily basis from her colleagues at the school. After all, anyone who has lived here in South Korea knows all about how radical the teachers’ union is and can be. Let’s face it, the victimization card here in South Korea is played to the fullest. Both the South Korean government and the media here play the victimization card on a seemingly daily basis. The South Korean government has a long history of stirring up hatred when it comes to Japan.

    I even see it at work. Where I work at Yongsan Garrison, we have to retitle our maps with the East Sea instead of the Sea of Japan, retitle the Strait of Tsushima to the Korean Strait, retitle the Yellow Sea to the West Sea, and, yes, retitle Takeshima to Tokdo, etc. We do that so, heaven forbid, some ROK officer won’t stop a military brief to mention that the “real” name of the Sea of Japan is the East Sea. Belive me it has happened on more than one occasion. I refuse to give in to that intimidation.

    Anyway, getting back to the apologies from the Japanese woman, she shouldn’t have to suffer from that kind of abuse. I remember reading an article where a whole class here at a university in Seoul humiliated a Japanese exchange student over the issue. Outrageous if you ask me. This is basically the same thing.

    Personally, I have a Japanese friend who works at a souvenir shop in Insa-dong. For several weeks, there were “patriotic” volunteers outside her shop that set up a huge display about the Liancourt Rocks (notice that I refuse to call them by their Korean name) and were agressively trying to get any passers-by to sign their petition, especially tourists. One night, the volunteers pestered my friend on her way home from work, thinking that she too was a “patriotic” Korean. She told them that she was Japanese and that she wasn’t going to apologize for anything that she didn’t do. In other words, she refused to be intimidated. When I saw the same people outside her store, I ignored them completely. That is what you have to do to these people.

    Chris
    Yongsan Garrison, Seoul

  29. comment number 29 by: ponta

    Chris
    Thanks.
    I’ve never been to korea, so I have to rely on books and blogs about Korea to know what is going on there.
    Stay with us. Your comments is very precious to me.

    BTW, have you been to Japan?

  30. comment number 30 by: Chris

    Ponta,

    Domo arigatou gozaimashita. Gamsa hamnida. Thank you for your kind words. I have been stationed here in South Korea for three-and-a-half years, so I know a thing or two about things Korean.

    Yes. I have been to Japan. Twice. In fact, I just got back from a five day trip to Tokyo for some much needed R and R only two weeks ago. It really is amazing just how similar Tokyo and Seoul are. That is really no surprise when you consider that the Seoul City Government has basically kept intact what the Japanese administrators were doing in regards to city planning. Plus, not to be too cynical here, the South Korean government pretty much copies just about everything the Japanese government does (and probably vice-versa, I’m sure).

    Anyway, I’m going off on a tangent. Again, thank you for your kind comments.

    Chris
    Yongsan Garrison, Seoul

  31. comment number 31 by: Two Cents

    Hi Chris,

    Plus, not to be too cynical here, the South Korean government pretty much copies just about everything the Japanese government does (and probably vice-versa, I’m sure).

    I’m not sure if there’s a lot of copying on the Japanese side, because the models for Japanese governement policies are currently Europe and USA (as has been for the last 150 years), although I believe the Austalian government’s strict policies regarding import of agricultural products and animals should be given more attention.

    A year or two ago, I read in a Japanese version of the Korean newspaper that one law passed by the Korean legislatures was later found to erroneously cite another bill that had no relevance to the law. The lawmakers apparently translated the text word for word from a new law passed in Japan, and forgot to change the number of the bill into the correct citation for Korean laws. Never heard of such incidents in Japan.

    I have heard that such direct translations from Japanese are common in Korea for legislation, medicine, sicence, and engineering in the past. One doctor was lamenting that the abolition of Chinese character eduction from schooling is begining to have a serious toll because of this. For example, AIDS in Japanese is 後天性免疫不全症候群. If you are Japanese, you can make an educated guess on what the word means, because
    後天性=after birth
    免疫=immune system
    不全=deficiency
    症候群=syndrome.
    However, since the Korean for AIDS simply is a hangul representation of the Japanese word, a Korean lacking knowledge of Chinese characters cannot recognize the meaning at first glance, and must memorize the word simply by sound, posing a great hurdle in reading comprehension.

    We do that so, heaven forbid, some ROK officer won’t stop a military brief to mention that the “real” name of the Sea of Japan is the East Sea. Belive me it has happened on more than one occasion. I refuse to give in to that intimidation.

    You mean even Korean military personnels regard the name of the sea more important than the swift interchange of military information? I was hoping that Koreans in the actual forefront had more sensible views on the order of things. Making a comment AFTER a brief like, “BTW please remenber that the name of the sea is the East Sea,” is acceptable, but interrupting a brief? Sigh. Well, maybe the briefs are routine and the contents aren’t really that new or important.

  32. comment number 32 by: Victor

    It really is amazing just how similar Tokyo and Seoul are.

    One of my Japanese friends once told me that Tokyo is very similar to Hong Kong. Perhaps Asian metropolitan cities share similar features? b/c Shanghai is supposed to be a replica of Hong Kong as well.

  33. comment number 33 by: Chris

    Two Cents and Victor,

    Thank you for your comments. Let me try to further explain what I meant in regards to the comments I made in a previous post about I how feel that the South Korean government copies the Japanese government. For example, look at the economic model that has been responsible for South Korea’s sudden rise. From what I can tell and from what I have read, the South Korean government has been pretty much copying what the Japanese government has done in regards to economic policy. That really isn’t a surprise since President Park Chung Hee, President of South Korea from 1961 to 1979, was more familiar with the Japanese model of economic development. How was he familiar you ask? Well, that is easy to answer. He was an officer in the Japanese Imperial Army in Manchuria during WWII. Park Chung Hee even graduated from Japan’s version of West Point. According to some of his detractors, President Park preferred to conduct cabinet meetings in Japanese, not Korean. Do you know what a chaebol is? A chaebol is basically the Korean version of a Japanese zaibatsu (conglomerate). There are some differences between the two to be sure (that I know of), such as LG, Samsung, and others were/are family owned. In fact, a lot of South Korea’s chaebols were started by family’s that actively collaborated with the Japanese colonial government, particularly Samsung. There is a book called The Colonial Origins of Korean Enterprise (I think) that would make fascinating reading. The Japanese government uses cutesy, comic book characters; the SK government does the same thing, even more so. Why, there is even a Korean version of the famous Japanese road construction sign that pictures a construction worker bowing (o-jigi) and apologizing. Coincidence? I think not. Look at SK license plates. They are virtually identical to Japanese license plates. What else? Tokyo and every other Japanese city is organized into ku (wards) (Shibuya-ku, Ikebukuro-ku, etc) and then into chome (a neighborhood, basically). Here in Seoul, the system is the same: ku are gu (Gangnam-gu, Yongsan-gu, etc) and then from there you have what are called dong (the equivalent to chome, Itaewon-2-dong [where I live], Hannam-1-dong, etc). Another legacy of the Japanese colonial period is Seoul Station. It was built by the same architect that built Tokyo Station, who used a train station in Amsterdam as his model. (A lot of Koreans would just love to tear that building down BTW.) I think there is a picture somewhere on this website that shows that Pusan Station was the same as well. Notice also how things in certain parts of the city are grouped together, such as Akihabara (electronics), shopping areas (Shibuya), kitchen ware (Kappabashi) and so on. That is a legacy of the Tokugawa Shogun who liked to group similar vendors together. The Governor General did the same thing here. The Akihabara area of Seoul is near Yongsan Station, it’s called E-Mart (original, huh?), instead of Shibuya there is Apgujeong and Myeongdong, in Tokyo a lot of foreigners go to Roppongi-here in Seoul it’s Itaewon, if you want sporting goods or clothes you go to Dongdaemun, and so on.

    There are a lot more similarities. However, that is all I can come up with right off the top of my head.

    Chris
    Yongsan Garrison, Seoul
    Former Home of the Japanese 20th Infantry Division

  34. comment number 34 by: ponta

    I was once told by an Amercian tuorist that Tokyo is similar to New York.
    When I went to Hong Kong, I have a impression that the part of Hong Kong is similar to the downtown like Ueno in Tokyo.
    Of cource, there should be a lot of differences but maybe urban cities more or less look similar on the surface.

  35. comment number 35 by: Two Cents

    Chris,

    There is a book called The Colonial Origins of Korean Enterprise (I think) that would make fascinating reading.

    Are you speaking of “Offspring of Empire: The Koch’ang Kims and the Colonial Origins of Korean Capitalism” by C.J. Eckert?

    I’m really not surprised that the systems of Japan and Korea are alike, because whether the Koreans like it or not, Japan adapated the system of modern society from those of western nations to suit the needs of Japanese society and transplanted it in its entirely in Korea (government, education, business, police, military, urban planning, etc.). After the war, South Korea kept the chinirupas (親日派) who knew how to run a modern country, while the North purged them and eventually ran itself into the ground. That is amazing considering that most of the industrial centers were in the North and so much of the public and private capital forfeited by Japan was taken by North Korea. Thus, it is no wonder that the South Korean system is to a great extent, a replica of Japan’s. What I can’t understand is the reverse part you mention: what aspect of modern Japan is a copy of Korea? I’ve never heard anyone claiming of having used Korea as a model. Maybe I’m just ignorant.

  36. comment number 36 by: Victor

    After the war, South Korea kept the chinirupas (親日派) who knew how to run a modern country, while the North purged them and eventually ran itself into the ground.

    As far as I know, South Korea was a basket case after the war. If I remember correctly, it was one of the poorest countries in the world and just about the the poorest country in Asia….Countries like North Korea, Vietnam, India and Laos were doing far better than South Korea, which remained undeveloped until the 70s…

    South korea has obviously come a long way…

  37. comment number 37 by: Victor

    p.s.
    Chris, by the way, thanks for your post…

  38. comment number 38 by: Chris

    Two Cents and Victor,

    Domo arigatou gozaimashita. Thank you for your responses.

    First off, Two Cents, don’t worry about what I wrote about the SK government influencing the Japanese government. I didn’t want to get into some kind of silly name-calling flame war with closed minded SK nationalists that read this site!!!! Each time that I have been to Tokyo and Osaka, I notice another way in which the South Koreans have copied the Japanese. (It is just like that entry here on this blog that has all of the pictures of the Japanese products with their Korean versions!!!) You are correct in many points in your post, especially about North Korea. What a lot of people here, mostly Americans in my experience, don’t realize is that most of the industry and investment that originated from Japanese colonial government was made in what is now North Korea. I believe this very blog has a picture of the Gwaecheon Hydroelectric Dam in North Korea. When it was built in the 1920s and 1930s, it was one of the largest hydroelectric dams in the world for its time, rivaling many of the hydroelectric dams built in the US during the same era. Most of North Korea’s industrial capacity were factories built with Japanese money. The southern part (aka South Korea) remained mostly rural, agricultural, and traditional.

    Second, Victor, you are absolutely correct in that SK was very poor for much of the Cold War period. However, with the huge sums of money that SK was receiving in ODA money and “reparations” from Japan, huge aid packages courtesy of the US tax payer, more than generous trade concessions from the US government, and that thing called a US trip-wire (the American 2nd Infantry Division) that has kept North Korea at bay for over 50 years, the Park Chung Hee Regime was able to develop the SK economy copying the Japanese economic model (a model that was largely already in place as Two Cents notes) down to the “T”. In my opinion, the SK government should tear down every poster, every display with LG, Samsung, Hyundai, and Daewoo printed on it at Incheon Airport. Instead, the SK government should put up posters and displays that read: The South Korean Economy Courtesy of Japanese ODA Aid, the US Taxpayer, and the US Military. That would keep all of the SK robot nationalists’ mouths shut for a long, long, long time. Why? Because it is the truth.

    Lastly, I don’t know about Tokyo being similar to New York or to Hong Kong. I haven’t been to either of those cities. To me, when I first went to Tokyo last year, the similarities between Tokyo and Seoul were just overwhelming. There are differences to be sure, such as people in Tokyo know how to drive, Koreans still can’t figure out that you are supposed to stop on a redlight; people in Tokyo use crosswalks and wait for the light to cross, Koreans don’t do either-they’ll jump out in front of a bus to cross the street; Tokyo is actually a very clean city-one of the cleanest in the world if I am not mistaken, Seoul has a lot of pockets of filth and that horrendous sewer stench can be pretty bad at times if you happen to walk past an open sewer. Here at Yongsan we have an open sewer that runs through post. People here call it the Kimchi River.

    Enjoy,

    Chris
    Yongsan Garrison, Seoul
    Former Home of the Japanese 20th Infantry Division

  39. comment number 39 by: Two Cents

    Victor,
    Do you think it is just a coincidence that the Miracle of Han River occured under Park Chong-hee, who had been educated and tranied under Japanese rule? Of course, much of the success of South Korea should be attributed to the hard work put in by the Koreans, although as Chris indictates, there were extensive economic assistance from both the US and Japan (and both countries would like South Korea to show just a little bit more respect for it). But all that work could have amounted to nothing if they didn’t have the right recipe, like in this woman’s case. In the case of North Korea, they threw out both the cook and the recipe.
    強引にマットのポストに繋げてみました。

  40. comment number 40 by: Victor

    Two Cents,
    I don’t know much about Park…Nonetheless, your post is pretty interesting.

    I wonder how korean nationalists would respond to that.

  41. comment number 41 by: Matt

    I don’t know much about Park…Nonetheless, your post is pretty interesting.

    I wonder how korean nationalists would respond to that.

    Here is a good place to start learning about Park.

  42. comment number 42 by: Victor

    Here is a good place to start learning about Park.

    Thanks, Matt!

  43. comment number 43 by: Two Cents

    Victor,
    If I were Korean, not only the nationalists but the Korean society would ostracize me like this professor emeritus (韓昇助) of Korea University (高麗大学) who was deprived of his status and had to go into hiding for a while for writing an article in a Japanese magazine that presented some positive perceptions about the Japanese annexation
    ttp://japanese.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2005/03/07/20050307000000.html

    I’ve read the article. All he said that was Korea should consider itself lucky that it was Japan and not Russia who took over the peninsula (as most likely would have been the case if Japan hadn’t taken control of the peninsula), and that old medival vices were discarded and modernization proceeded immensely under Japanese rule. He also said what I wrote above – that throwing out the chinirupas (the cooks)and the Japanese system (the recipe) would have been bad judgement for the prosperity of the Korean people, as has been proven by the failure of the North, and so why should the South Korean society try to punish them now after all these years by passing laws to defame them and possibly their descendants as well. (Personally, I think the defaming of descendants who are political opponents are part of the reason for passing the law.) He stressed that the South Korean society doesn’t have to erase the accomplishments of the chinirupas to rid itself of the propagandized inferiority complex towards the purified North.

    If I were a famous Japanese, maybe I would have the honor of having someone chop off their finger or torch themselves in protest. Since I’m not, they’ll just dismiss my opinion as madman’s perception (妄言) or lash out at me without any real debate and cause much trouble for Matt.

  44. comment number 44 by: Victor

    Two Cents,
    I have to admit that your post (as well as Chris’) is quite “enlightening”. And based on your post, I have the impression that South Koreans are being irrational when it comes to Japan…..

    Anyway, I’d still like to point out two “flaws” in your post:

    modernization proceeded immensely under Japanese rule.

    I am pretty skeptical about your suggestion that the colonization period somehow benefitted Korea. True, it would have been worse if Korea was colonized by Russia. Then by the same token, wouldn’t it have been better if Korea was colonized by France, Britain or the US, instead of Japan? But what a lousy discussion it would be if we try to choose the best country to be colonized by… The fact is that colonization is designed to exploit another country, not to develop the country. Colonization is about exploitation. Period!

    Britain and France basically had the same argument when they launched their colonization fleets to much of the African continent as well as to South Asia. They said, “we are bringing modernization and industrial development to these undeveloped parts of the world.” And, do you honestly think that the British modernized India, for example? If that was the case, why would have Gandhi opposed such modernization??

    as has been proven by the failure of the North,

    IMHO, comparing the two koreas like comparing the U.S. and Russia. It’s like comparing China (mainland) with Hong Kong or China with Taiwan. How about the rich West Germany and the impoverished East Germany in the 80s? And, North Korea is far more “communist” than any of the listed countries…

    Yes, North Korea has apparently relied on “certified” bad cooks – communists!

    Yes, it has followed a “certifified” bad recipe -communist principles…

  45. comment number 45 by: Victor

    If I were Korean, not only the nationalists but the Korean society would ostracize me like this professor emeritus (韓昇助) of Korea University (高麗大学) who was deprived of his status and had to go into hiding for a while for writing an article in a Japanese magazine that presented some positive perceptions about the Japanese annexation

    By the way, I have to say that such reactions reek of nationalism or even a victim syndrome…

    I hope it will change (for the sake of Koreans)…

  46. comment number 46 by: ponta

    Victor

    “”South Koreans are being irrational when it comes to Japan…..
    I agree.

    I have read this article today.

    http://www.koreaherald.co.kr/SITE/data/html_dir/2005/09/30/200509300005.asp

    “Kimchi stands for Korean national pride・・・・Adding insult to injury, kimchi of Japanese variety, called “kimuji,” has outstripped the genuine Korean brand in the world kimchi trade.”

    I like sushi, but am I proud of sushi? do I feel insulted or injured when I see a Korean cooking sushi better?—Nahhhh.

    Do you understand psycology of Korean?

  47. comment number 47 by: Victor

    Ponta,

    I took a quick look at it. Actually, it is an editorial. Try not to read it with a straight face b/c the writer is obviously trying to have some fun here.

    “Kimchi stands for Korean national pride” is meant to be a joke and a good attention-getter. “Adding insult to injury” is just an expression. It does not mean that koreans feel “insulted” or “injured” by the Chinese Kimchi..

  48. comment number 48 by: ponta

    Victor
    Okay


  49. […] me of the commenters were a bit doubtful about the sincerity of woman that made the ‘Dokdo apology cakes‘, so I have decided not to believe her until she bakes an apology cake while covered […]

  50. comment number 50 by: Brian

    That cake looks gross.
    also, I think she is nuts.