Occidentalism
Duc, sequere, aut de via decede!

Former SK President Choe Gyu-ha Dead

October 21st, 2006 . by Gerry-Bevers

Former South Korean President Choe Gyu-ha was found unconscious at his home this morning (October 22) at about 6 a.m. and taken to Seoul National University Hospital, where he died at 7:37 a.m. He was 87. Yahoo News

More from Yonhap News


6 Responses to “Former SK President Choe Gyu-ha Dead”

  1. comment number 1 by: tomato

    Gerry>

    What’s so significant about this?

    BTW, it’s interesting that in the English version of his profile in Wikipedia states nothnig about him graduating Tokyo Teacher’s School and later becoming a goverment official of Manchukuo, both during the Japanese Imperial Era of course.

    Actually, I think many articles in the Engilsh Wikipedia are nonsense. For examplen in the “Korea under Japanese Rule” one can find:

    . Starting in 1938, Koreans located in Korea were forced into the Japanese military and the first “Korean Voluntary” Unit was formed. Among notable Korean personnel in the Imperial Army was Hong Shi-Yok (洪思翊), a lieutenant general. Many later gained administrative posts in the government of South Korea but were limited in rank, one well-known example being Park Chung Hee (朴正熙; 박정희), who became years later a South Korea president.

    Great. Officers who had Japanese soldiers at their disposal were forced into the Army…Just give me a break.

    And this:

    In 2002 South Korea started an investigation of Japanese collaborators. Part of the investigation was completed in 2006 and a list of various names of individuals who profited from exploitation of fellow Koreans were posted. Many collaborators were able to afford higher education with the money they had made from exploitations, this allowed them to take up influential positions and afford to contribute to the well being of their children who also profited from Japan’s exploitations.

    I’m sure that a Korean ultranationalist wrote this, and it is just horrible.

  2. comment number 2 by: KidfromOhio

    tomato – sadly enough – there ARE motherfuckers like those – for instance, the candidate that ran against president Roh – was a judge during the WW2 era –

    He managed to hang the freedom fighter who wrote liberation papers.

    And do you think he didn’t receive any….previlages? and yes, a fucker like that ran for president. Look it up.

  3. comment number 3 by: GarlicBreath

    KidFO

    Look it up.

    Actually can you look it up. Who and what are you talking about? Remember WW2 was 60 + years ago.

  4. comment number 4 by: ponta

    tomato – sadly enough – there ARE motherfuckers like those – for instance, the candidate that ran against president Roh – was a judge during the WW2 era –

    To deny so called motherfuckers amounts to be denying Korea as it is now.

    There is fewer freedom fighter than you imagine.

    For Korean historians, the colonial period is both too painful and too saturated with resistance mythologies that cannot find verification in any archive. North Korea has concocted whole tapestries of events that exist only in the hagiography of Kim Il Sung..In the South one particular decade—that between 1935 and 1945—is an empty cupboard:millions of people used and abused by the Japanese cannot get records on what they know to have happened to them ,and thousands of Korean who worked with the Japanese have simply erased that history as if it had never happened. Even lists of officials in local genealogical repositories (country histories, for example) go blank on this period

    (Bruce coming/page 139)
    I guess so called freedom fighter escaped from Korea before the annexation.

    The population of Korea almost doubled while it had decreased before.
    More than 300,000 Korean young men voluntarily applied for Japanese Army when Tojou was a prime minister.
    And during this period, Korea developed radically.

    Drawing on the Meiji government’s experience, the colonial state introduced a set of expensive policy measures to modernize Korea. One important project was to improve infrastructure: railway lines were extended, and roads and harbors and communication networks were improved, which rapidly integrated goods and factor markets both nationally and internationally. Another project was a vigorous health campaign: the colonial government improved public hygiene, introduced modern medicine, and built hospitals significantly accelerating the mortality decline set in motion around 1890, apparently by the introduction of the smallpox vaccination. The mortality transition resulted in a population expanding 1.4% per year during the colonial period. The third project was to revamp education. As modern teaching institutions quickly replaced traditional schools teaching Chinese classics, primary school enrollment ration rose from 1 percent in 1910 to 47 percent in 1943. Finally, the cadastral survey (1910-18) modernized and legalized property rights to land, which boosted not only the efficiency in land use, but also tax revenue from landowners. These modernization efforts generated sizable public deficits, which the colonial government could finance partly by floating bonds in Japan and partly by unilateral transfers from the Japanese government.

    link
    And for instance ,Seou University is Keijo was founded by Japan.

    If you really want to wipe out things benefited from the colonization, punish people who cooperated with Imperial Japan, who benefited from the colonization, I am afraid South Korea would end up with something like North Korea.

    Besides, it is the principle of modern law that retroactive punishment is prohibited.

    But anyway that is not Japan’s problem, it is Koreans who decides what should be done about Korea and Koreans.

    I am looking forwards to seeing how future Korean historians see this period.

  5. comment number 5 by: tomato

    ponta,

    In the South one particular decade—that between 1935 and 1945—is an empty cupboard:millions of people used and abused by the Japanese cannot get records on what they know to have happened to them ,and thousands of Korean who worked with the Japanese have simply erased that history as if it had never happened. Even lists of officials in local genealogical repositories (country histories, for example) go blank on this period

    This is probably because there were no such abuses, and the majority of the Koreans accepted the fact that they are Japanese citizens and acted accordingly. I don’t see nothing wrong with Koreans joining the Japanese military or going to Japanese schools. Or becoming a judge. What’s so wrong with getting education to get a good job? The ethno-purist stance of the present South Korean regime is outright crazy. If you condemn all S Koreans who worked hard during the Japanese era, there will not be much of S Korea left. That is the reality.

    Kidfromohio,

    I’m surprised that even though you claim to be from the US, you seem to be one of those Korean ultranationalists and ethno-purists. When you join the US military, can the US be sure that you will place privilages on American ideals?

  6. comment number 6 by: ponta

    This is probably because there were no such abuses, and the majority of the Koreans accepted the fact that they are Japanese citizens and acted accordingly. I don’t see nothing wrong with Koreans joining the Japanese military or going to Japanese schools. Or becoming a judge. What’s so wrong with getting education to get a good job? The ethno-purist stance of the present South Korean regime is outright crazy. If you condemn all S Koreans who worked hard during the Japanese era, there will not be much of S Korea left. That is the reality.

    I agree.
    I guess there were some cases where Japanese used racial slur to Korean people at that time. But on the whole the system was working pretty well to such an extent that some Koreans people enthusiastically wanted to be identified with Japanese.
    As for a judge at the time, his job is to apply the Japanese civil and criminal law to a specific case nonarbitrary to keep the order of the society.
    For instance, after 31 movement in 1919, 6,1417 Koreans were prosecuted, 3967 were found guilty, 58 not guilty. There were no death sentence, and there were no sentence over 15 years prisonment. 6 people were sentenced 10~14 years prisonment, 1 person for less than 9 years, 23 people for less than 6 years.50 people for less than 4 years. 80 people for more than 3 years.
    Now I am not sure the Korean judge in question was there to judge these sentences but it was done based on the law of evidence.
    And after this incident, Japan took cultural policy, and many leader of the movement turned to be pro-Japanese. That is why they were not worshipped by South Koreans despite the contribution to the independent movement.(Correct me if I am wrong)
    I would like to know what Kidfromohio is talking about when he said the judge hanged the freedom fighter.
    Maybe is he talking about Koreans who tortured Koreans, as shown in the indecency museum in Korea, more cruelly than Japanese boss during the colonization.?.(“The survivors say that Lee Hong Gyu was more cruel and barbaric to his fellow countrymen than his Japanese masters.)
    But if the purpose and spirit of the punishment is to purge pro-Japanese at the time, Korea might need to broaden the definition of pro-Japanese to be punished.
    As I said , more than 300,000 Koreans volountarily applied for Japanese army, they positively, volountarily expressed their will to participate in Imperial Japan, why not punish them?
    The colonization made it possible that non-Yanbang become equal status and earned more money than Yanban as Carter J. Eckert wrote in his book. Non-yanban made use of the colonization and got richer And “this allowed them to take up influential positions and afford to contribute to the well being of their children .”
    Why not take up their property?
    For that matter, why not punish Yanban who squeezed and agonized Koreans but started as an elite in the colonization ?
    Why not punish Koreans who were saved by medication system which was made possible by “exploiting” Koreans and tax from Japanese?
    It seems Korean arbitrarily draw the line between pro-Japanese and non-pro-Japanese for political purpose. There are many things I can not understand about Korea, and it is basically Korean problem, but. I hope they learn not to use history politically.