Occidentalism
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Foul sushi factory in Sydney

May 29th, 2007 . by Matt

The Sydney Morning Herald has an article titled “Rat droppings everywhere in sushi factory” describing the atrocious conditions at a sushi factory in Sydney. The name of the factory is “Sushi Nara”, which means “Sushi Country” in Korean.

THE pest inspector Bill Lincoln smelt the rats before he saw them when he visited the Sushi World’s factory in Camperdown to quote on fixing the rodent problem last year.

“It was horrific … the stench of rat urine was bad,” he said of the premises the Herald revealed this week had been fined 11 times, and closed for a second time early this month, for breaching hygiene laws.

As Mr Lincoln walked through the premises in Larkin Street last year, he was stunned by what he found. “There were rats in the rice cases; there was shredded paper on the ground where they were making nests; there were droppings everywhere,” he said.

Mr Lincoln said he had seen many food businesses with rat infestations but none as bad as the Larkin Street factory.

Details of the repeated hygiene breaches by one of Sydney’s biggest sushi suppliers came as the Government promised to end the secrecy that has prevented the public finding out about food businesses that have been fined for breaching food safety laws. After a year-long attempt by the Herald using freedom of information laws to get access to details of fines imposed on restaurants and businesses like Sushi World, the NSW Minister for Primary Industries, Ian Macdonald, promised to amend the Food Act within months to ensure fines will be made public.

“I am totally happy to do it. I would hope to have it finalised in the spring session of Parliament, ” he told the Herald yesterday.

Mr Macdonald said he was committed to publishing inspection results in line with practice in other countries but said he had yet to decide what system to use.

A “short review” by the NSW Food Authority would consider displaying hygiene scores in restaurant windows, as happens in Los Angeles, or to put details on the internet, as happens in New York, the minister said.

The review would consider if restaurant owners should be able to add their own comments to reports about inspection results, as happens overseas.

The Government’s promise came as Mr Lincoln, who worked for Alliance First pest control company, detailed what he saw when he did his inspection.

“In the [sushi] preparation area I saw a food preparation glove that had been chewed out the night before. There were droppings on the benches.

“There was a storage cupboard on the wall and you could see the smearings on it where the rats jumped down. There was a dead rat caught halfway through a wall. He was quite fresh; I think probably three or four days old.”

The Camperdown factory used to supply some businesses operating as Sushi World. Fourteen outlets – at Bondi Junction, Campsie, Castle Hill, Chatswood, Centrepoint Tower, Hurstville, Northbridge Plaza, Randwick Plaza, Sydney Airport and Warringah Mall – operate under a company called Sushi Nara Australia. A lawyer for Sushi Nara said the Camperdown factory had not supplied those businesses for the past 18 months.

What is most horrible about this is that I have actually bought take away sushi from some of those shops.


84 Responses to “Foul sushi factory in Sydney”

  1. comment number 1 by: kjeff

    ponta,
    You(or, someone else here) often mention that I’m(well, Koreans) not self-critical enough. I think if you look at our last few exchanges again, you should be able to see why.
    I wrote:

    I’m a little frustrated here because it seems like you’re not really looking for an honest discussion -of food culture-.

    Notice that I shift the focus on myself(rather putting the entire blame on you), and I chose “seems like” because I didn’t want to be definite about your intentions(I’m not you; it’s always just a guess).

    This really is a silly statement after my previous comment.

    I chose “silly” because I want something that is non-specific, and as less offensive as possible, and yet get my point across. You should be able to see why if you read my earlier comment, and then read your response again.

    Enough with that Harry Potter thing(it is, isn’t it? Never read/watch the book/movie.) You can’t seriously used that as an example.

    You based your entire argument on what Marmot did? I felt that you were avoiding the issue, but I gave you the benefit of the doubt, and again tried to get to the bottom of it by being more specific,

    Can you name anything that you think Koreans hate about Japan apart from those three?

    If you read my comment again, you’ll see that yours, above, is unnecessary, and/or irrelevant.

    There’s a sentence fragment in my earlier comment that justifies the above.(I’d put it there because I’d half-expected that you would write what you eventually wrote) Again, I didn’t want to be specific because I didn’t want to be cofrontational.
    And this was your response,

    What happened to your wit and sense of your humor you usually show?
    Did you have a fight with your wife this morning?
    Is this the way your wife argue with you? If that is the case, I sympathise with you;that is not the
    argument but just emotional response .

    I thought it was ‘amusing’. And(or, is it ‘but’), after what happened with GarlicBreath, I was in an especially more conciliatory mood because I appreciate how you’ve been different in your approach compare to him. Hence,

    I think those were valid observations, but you’re right…not my best…lol. I think GarlicBreath ate my “wit and sense of humor.”

    I wasn’t willing to give up what I wrote, but I wanted to end the sentence with a general ambiguous concession(I was half-affraid that you or someone else will pick on it if it were ‘full’, and I was right).

    When the response is emotional there is no observational content to be valid or invalid. That is why it is hard to argue with.
    I am looking forwards to your meaningful comment as before.

    You disregarded my concession, and still on the same point; you could have been a little more graceful I think. I appreciate how you end it though. And then there was HanComplex, whom I fear has joined the dark force recently,

    Spot on, ponta. I noticed that Koreans often tend to get emotional during argumentation, especially when they’re losing. I think in their culture they consider expressions of emotion to be a valid aspect of debating. LOL. That would actually explain why people here like yourself and Ken have difficulty arguing with kjeff and Koreans in general; they become illogical soon enough when critical thinking gets thrown out in favor of feelings. Though I’m sure many non-Koreans who have dealt with Koreans know this already.
    Must be funny to see two Koreans arguing, say kjeff and his wife. Once they become emotional they stop making sense, yet to themselves they still do. LOL

    How do you really expect us to be self-critical here, in this environment where everything is but an opportunity, to blindly bash, bash, and bash. Is repeating it three times a sign of emotional distress? lol… BTW, I still very much want to know what it is that you think Korean hates about Japan/Japanese/Japanese culture beside those ‘big’ three.

  2. comment number 2 by: Kaneganese

    kjeff,

    It means that to be fair, the Japanese government will actually have to ‘evaluate’ all of them, which is to say impossible.

    How do you know it is impossible? There are numerous ways to achieve if you need to protect your national interests, especially health problems. They may issue the certificate one by one in 10 years, or they will survey the restaurant only when the owner applied to. Don’t say “impossible” and give up even before you start. That is a key to change your country from developping to developped in my opinion. You will understand why Japan was the only country in Asia who succeeded in modernization and industrialization in 19th century.

  3. comment number 3 by: kjeff

    Kaneganese,
    In the 20 mile radius of my house, there are close to 200 Japanese restaurants, and those are the ones listed as such. So I would say that the total number in the U.S. alone is in the high thousands, if not more. Health and sanitary inspections in this case have to be voluntary(Japanese government doesn’t have any legal right in foreign land), and serve little purpose.(I clean my house when I know that a guest is coming) I guess you can go with the lab route, but that’s expensive and time consuming, not to mention all the legal wranglings when a restaurant is not satisfied with the results.(It’s different from finding rat droppings in the kitchen)

    They may issue the certificate one by one in 10 years

    If the intented evaluation is health and safety and not mere taste, this will be problematic. Imagine if you own a Japanese restaurant, and you haven’t been visited by the ‘inspectors’ and thus, do not have the ‘safe’ label. But another restaurant down the block had, and has a ‘safe’ sticker on its door. Imagine the lawsuits. And let’s say, somehow, you manage to bring thousands of inspectors over and do the inspections all at the same time. Congrats…until you get the results, good luck defending yourself from lawsuits from those who are not satisfied. The only way to do this is to give ‘excellence’ awards to a few, very few, chosen restaurants.(I’ve seen a similar thing in Korea, but I heard the process was rather corrupt)

  4. comment number 4 by: ponta

    Kjeff

    Notice that I shift the focus on myself(rather putting the entire blame on you), and I chose “seems like” because I didn’t want to be definite about your intentions

    This is where you went wrong. Don’t attack me, attack my argument, and I think that is the basic of the debate.

    I chose “silly” because I want something that is non-specific, and as less offensive as possible, and yet get my point across. You should be able to see why if you read my earlier comment, and then read your response again.

    Here again, you went wrong. Suppose I say , in response to this comment, ” This is silly comment, you should read my earlier comment again.” Is this less offenseve? Is is an argument?

    There’s a sentence fragment in my earlier comment that justifies the above.(I’d put it there because I’d half-expected that you would write what you eventually wrote) Again, I didn’t want to be specific because I didn’t want to be cofrontational.

    “I half-expeceted you would eventurally write what you are writing. But I don’t want to be confrontatoinal. ” —Don’t you think it is hard to call it argument?

    How do you really expect us to be self-critical here, in this environment where everything is but an opportunity, to blindly bash, bash, and bash. Is repeating it three times a sign of emotional distress? lol… BTW,

    Quite easy. Just admit Korea is wrong where Korea is wrong.
    When I was debating on the issue of comfort women,
    I admitted Japanese government was mostly to blame. Still I was called a holocaust denier, neo-nationalist, etc. And yet, I kept arguing with reasons and evidences. It turns out that the opponent finally admitted what I had been insisting;Japan as a policy didn’t abducted women contrary to the general belief Koreans hold.
    (BTW, the other Japanese commenter was banned.
    )
    General Tiger called me ignorant. I didn’t react emotionally. It turned out that it was him who escaped.
    That often happened with Korean commenters with which I argued on this blog. When they are cornered , they exploded, and they disappeared.

    I agree the environment might influence you, and it might be distressing, but that is the very situation you need to show your integrity

    I still very much want to know what it is that you think Korean hates about Japan/Japanese/Japanese culture beside those ‘big’ three.

    Yes. what makes you thinkg in general Koreans are not anti-Japan?.
    Some of the Korean commenters have no hesitation to admit it.
    I have no time to pick up everything, but there is a a blog(Japanese) that dedicates itself to show how Korea looks at Japan. In general it is not just bored young kids, but politics, the media, education in Korea that are anti-Japan.
    Don’t you think it is a crazy situation that you dare not name the nationality when Miss Universe turn out to be Japanese?

    Anyway I like your sense of humor.Tthough I disagree with you on many points, that is okay.
    The only complaint I have with you is that you look much better when you frankly admit the points where Korea is wrong.
    Thanks.

  5. comment number 5 by: Kaneganese

    kjeff.

    We will see.

    There will no lawsuit only because they didn’t get the sicker from foreign government unless you get “inauthentic” sticker. It is simple.

  6. comment number 6 by: Kaneganese

    General Tiger,

    Just out of curiosity, what is the origin of kimbab and how old does it dates back in Korea? I had one in Korea almost 14 years ago. What about laver? The oldest Japanese record of laver as a food is early 4th century in HitachinokuniHudoki(常陸国風土記) in 713.

  7. comment number 7 by: GarlicBreath

    Koreanjeff:

    If you want to reduce Japanese culture into Dokdo/Takeshima, comfort women, Sea of Japan/East Sea, and sure, you’re probably right. But, I think it’ll be difficult to find more than a few misguided individuals who actually hate Japanese culture as a whole.

    Survey says that few Koreans like japan.

  8. comment number 8 by: kjeff

    ponta,
    This is fun. Ok, let’s recap. This is comment #36,
    You wrote,

    What is so interesting is that Korean people are so proud of their culture and yet they are hesitant to sell it to other culture, saying for instance,”the smell is just to distracting afterward.” Is it distracting for Koreans too?

    I responded,

    If you read my comments, you’ll see that I was referring to ‘lunch’(most of us have to go back to work after that) in a Korean bbq restaurant. And I assume the same can be said for those in Korea. As I understand it, bbq menus, due to the smell and its price, are mostly reserved for dinner or when ‘entertaining’ clients. However, I’m pretty sure Koreans are more used to, hence, tolerant to the smell than those who are not.

    You wrote,

    Why is it is so popular in Korea? If it is popular in Korea, why not in the western world?

    I responded,

    That’s a surprisingly complex question, and I’m not sure if I’m equipped to properly answer that. I can only guess, but somebody should really do a research on it. All I can say is that culture differences, food culture included, are real. I’m pretty sure there are some reasons why Chinese/Japanese/Korean all have different shape of chopsticks. I remember an interesting thing that I heard about Chinese beer. I was told that the Chinese used beer(news to me since I grew up in a 90%+ muslim country), not to drink socially, but to rinse their mouth from the oily food they just ate, and that’s why its alcohol content is low compare to others. Having said that, I’m not sure if sushi/sashimi could have its mainstream status without the popularity of ‘everything’ Japanese(driven by Japanese style business and mangement) in the 80s. Korea certainly hasn’t had that, if ever…(although when I went back to Indonesia last year, there were certainly a lot more Korean restaurants than it had been just five years ago)
    And oh, Chinese food…hmmm…growing up eating real Chinese food(and Indonesian food), I can say that I’ve never had Chinese food outside Chinatown outside Asia, I think Chinese food has largely been relegated to take-out/delivery niche; I actually can’t remember the last time I had lunch/dinner in a Chinese restaurant.

    Now, from those somewhat long and elaborate answers, this was the only thing you took from it,

    I’m pretty sure Koreans are more used to, hence, tolerant to the smell than those who are not.

    In which you responded,

    So? everyone is new to a different culture.
    Why not sell the product you are so proud of ?
    BTW do you know the origin of Korean barbecue?

    I could only gather from your response that, in the first sentence, you didn’t read my comment, or simply chose to ignore it. In second sentence, you basically repeated what you had written earlier, essentially non-responsive to my answers, which to me is clearly a confrontational signature. And in third sentence, you tried to change the subject, and possibly baiting me to produce a similar response(origin of sushi?). I think my response below is warranted.

    I’m a little frustrated here because it seems like you’re not really looking for an honest discussion -of food culture-. AND This really is a silly statement after my previous comment.

    Were those arguments? No, but they were legitimate observations of your non-responsiveness.
    Again, this is what I wrote,

    The funny thing is I often heard Koreans complaining that they are, as people(as contrast to government or institutions), too self-critical. I think you just haven’t been looking at the right places. If you can read Korean, just go to Daum, and pick any society topic(or, any actually), and all(dramatic licence) you see is criticisms. As for those Korea-Japan issues…naahhh…those are more like sporting events. We’re not Jesus; we pick sides, and I’m pretty sure you do too.

    AS CONTRAST TO GOVERNMENT OR INSTITUTIONS(sentence fragment), that should be pretty clear, and here’s your response,

    What is so weird and scary is that Koreans, the ruling party and the opposing party, are in agreement about being Anti-Japan just as North Korea is.

    Reading your response I concluded that a) it was unnecessary, because I already conceded a similar point, and/or b) it was irrelevant if you knew and purposely ignore it. Were those arguments? No, but they were valid observations of your response.

    Yes. what makes you thinkg in general Koreans are not anti-Japan?.

    Hmmm…you’re asking me how I know I don’t hate you…Now, I could list a hundred(not literal) things that Koreans like about Japan/Japanese/Japanes culture and they’re still not going to be good enough for you.

    Some of the Korean commenters have no hesitation to admit it.
    I have no time to pick up everything, but there is a a blog(Japanese) that dedicates itself to show how Korea looks at Japan. In general it is not just bored young kids, but politics, the media, education in Korea that are anti-Japan.
    Don’t you think it is a crazy situation that you dare not name the nationality when Miss Universe turn out to be Japanese?

    I understand your time constraint…but pretty please…just name one or two, you don’t have to explain them, simply name them. Ex: Koreans hates Japanese….. Thanks.
    Kaneganese,
    I have no problem with ‘authentic’ stamp as I’ve mentioned in my earlier comment(yours was about “health” I thought). Well I called it “silly” I think, but still, I had no problem with that. I prefer ‘excellence’ though, ‘authentic’ is sooo…difficult to assess. Japan is kind of ‘big’. It kind of reminds me of all those restaurants claiming to have authentic Pyongyang Naeng-Myun.

  9. comment number 9 by: kjeff

    GarlicBreath,
    I think is unfair for you knowing my name, and me not knowing yours. I won’t respond until that’s settled.

  10. comment number 10 by: General Tiger

    Kaneganese:

    Just out of curiosity, what is the origin of kimbab and how old does it dates back in Korea? I had one in Korea almost 14 years ago. What about laver? The oldest Japanese record of laver as a food is early 4th century in HitachinokuniHudoki(常陸国風土記) in 713.

    The oldest RECORD I can remember at the moment is Samguk Yusa (三國遺事), which records that Shilla has eaten laver from the beginning.
    .
    The first “Kimbab” was a very simple thing: you just took a piece of laver, put a bit of rice and stuff on top, and eat it. It should be noticed that “Kimbab” is literatlly “laver” rice.
    .
    Kimbab came upon a revolution during the Japanese occupation, when the art of making nori sushi transformed the casually made kimbab into the current form of using the bamboo mat.
    .
    There are several differences between Kimbab and nori sushi. The most obvious one is use lack of rice vinegar, while sesame oil is used. The style of filling is also different, with the nori sushi concntrating on taste and kimbab on abundance.
    .
    Although there are many sites that claim Kimbab is a Koreanized nori sushi, it should be pointed out that it’s the other way around: the modern Kimbab is a Japanized kimbab.
    .
    Is this okay for you, mate?

  11. comment number 11 by: Kaneganese

    Thank you, General Tiger,

    Japanese sushi originate from Southeastern-Asia or Sothern China. It was a method to process to fermentate fishes with a bit of malted rice. We still have some ancient forms of those fermented fishes in some places in Japnan. It estimated to be in Edo era when Japanese started to eat vinegered rice with raw fish or vegetables because it is quick to cook. It is very reasonable to put sushi on a bamboo grass and eat raw fishes with vinegar and ginger because they have natural anti-bacterial function.

    Anyway, I don’t think Korean Kimbub is suhi at all. I just still don’t get exactly when kimbub started to appear in Korean history. When Korean started to make paper shape laver in the first place? Sorry for annoying you.

  12. comment number 12 by: Kaneganese

    The first “Kimbab” was a very simple thing: you just took a piece of laver, put a bit of rice and stuff on top, and eat it. It should be noticed that “Kimbab” is literatlly “laver” rice.

    I was kind of hoping more precise explanation. Do you have any reliable source or documentation to support this? Thanks.

  13. comment number 13 by: ponta

    Kjeff
    thanks for your review of your comment.
    I know what you wrote.
    My question was, as your review showed,

    What is so interesting is that Korean people are so proud of their culture and yet they are hesitant to sell it to other culture, saying for instance,”the smell is just to distracting afterward.” Is it distracting for Koreans too?

    And your answer is

    culture differences, food culture included, are real

    I’m pretty sure Koreans are more used to, hence, tolerant to the smell than those who are not.

    And that does not answer my question.
    Let’s say Koreans are proud of Korea food.
    My question is why not sell it to other culture if they are so proud of it.
    No Japanese knew that Koreans loved Japanese porno, but it turned out they loved it.
    Why not just try selling Korean culture you are so proud of instead of selling Japanese culture they are generally against?
    There are cultural difference for sure. That does not stop Indian curry, nor Islam religion, Karate, pornography etc from going on the market.
    If Korean can be torelant of the smell, why not the
    western people?

    You are frustrated because you can not answer.
    You use the word “dishonest” “silly” because you can not argue.
    You shift the topic to my attitude from my argument because you can not stay on the topic.
    As for Korean anti-Japan-ism, let me cite a few.
    As for the education, there are infamous drawings on the subway and the distorted history textbook that mostly focuses on the negative aspects of the colonization. As for the politics, there are many asymmetrical attitude toward North Korea and toward Japan: And there are hundreds of other examples…. just look at the link I put up….the site mostly cites from Korean media…..

  14. comment number 14 by: kjeff

    ponta,
    Again, my answer was 20 lines long, but all you really got was 2. But, I won’t go over that again… As I mentioned earlier, sushi/sashimi wouldn’t have had a fighting chance had it not been for the popularity of ‘everything’ Japanese in the 70s and 80s, driven by Japanese style business and management. I’d imagine that you’d bring a Japanese client to a restaurant, and try a few yourself to impress them, and that’s how it spread(in addition to the diet fab that occured, and is, later on). Korean food didn’t have that, and probably never will. Chinese food has the ‘getting there early’, and their sheer population size. As far as I know, most Chinatowns are located downtown, whereas Koreatowns are mostly in suburb(the 2 block strips on 32nd street in Manhattan not withstanding), and real estate matters. I’d say though that Chinese food is still a niche market, because it’s dominated by take-out and delivery, and not as mainstream as its Japanese counterpart. You mentioned Indian curry, except in Japan, and to certain extent Korea, it’s not mainstream. The South-East Asian curries taste different from their Indian counterpart, and the curry was introduced and spread during a stretch(hundreds of years)of Hindu kingdoms period there centuries ago. Bali is still 90% Hindus actually. Religions, sports, and pornograhy often transcend cultural barriers, and they’re not really relevant here. Can you really do a Kalbi exhibition the way Taekwondo did? Food-wise, I can only see two that actually ‘made’ it in the world, sushi/sashimi and pizzas/pasta. You can argue McDonalds, BK, and etc, but they’re not really… I don’t French food, because it’s mostly because it is French, and it’s still a small niche.
    I think I gave an example of the Chinese beer earlier to illustrate how different sometime we can be in using almost the exact same thing. What beer is to me may not be what beer is to another person. Food and its consumption are decidedly more complex than that. Have you ever noticed that you rarely see a table for two in Korean restaurants? I can only guess a dinner for two is rather a foreign concept to them. It’s a concept that it’s difficult to adjust because it’s inherent in its DNA. I’d say ‘real’ Korean food is all about the side dishes…are they meant to be shared by only two people? Again, I don’t really see how Korean food can become mainstream without the help of other ‘happenings’ culture-wise(the TV soap opera thing in Asia, for example). Being proud of something, and selling it to other culture are two very different things. I was frustrated because I think you know this, and that your question was merely a show-off and a put-down. “We’ve made it…why can’t you…why can’t you…why can’t you?”
    You seem to be stuck with the ‘smell’ thing, but it’s really just one aspect, one.

    As for the education, there are infamous drawings on the subway and the distorted history textbook that mostly focuses on the negative aspects of the colonization. As for the politics, there are many asymmetrical attitude toward North Korea and toward Japan: And there are hundreds of other examples…. just look at the link I put up….the site mostly cites from Korean media…..

    Dokdo/Comfort Women/Sea of Japan is about colonialization, and anything about Japan’s ‘stay’ early last century falls along the same line. “Assymetrical attitude,” I’m not really sure what you meant there. And, “the hundred of examples,” I would rather read ONE(well, I appreciate if you give me more than just that one) from you.

  15. comment number 15 by: ponta

    Kjeff
    I think it is getting boring for other readers, but I’ll accompany you to your satisfaction.

    Again, my answer was 20 lines long, but all you really got was 2.

    What other argument did you have?

    That’s a surprisingly complex question, and I’m not sure if I’m equipped to properly answer that. I can only guess,

    Was this relevant? I think I did justice to your argument, citing the two line.

    sushi/sashimi wouldn’t have had a fighting chance had it not been for the popularity of ‘everything’ Japanese in the 70s and 80s, driven by Japanese style business and management.

    I was living in the US in the 80’s and it is far from the truth that there was the popularity of “everything’ Japanese.

    I’d imagine that you’d bring a Japanese client to a restaurant, and try a few yourself to impress them, and that’s how it spread(in addition to the diet fab that occurred, and is, later on). Korean food didn’t have that, and probably never will.

    Why not? You can try a few yourself to impress them.

    I can only guess a dinner for two is rather a foreign concept to them. It’s a concept that it’s difficult to adjust because it’s inherent in its DNA.

    As I said, another culture is always foreign at first. Why don’t Korean people think up new methods
    to sell things unique to Korean culture they are so proud of instead of selling things Japanese?

    I don’t really see how Korean food can become mainstream without the help of other ‘happenings’ culture-wise(the TV soap opera thing in Asia, for example).

    So you can think up “happenings” to sell things Koreans are so proud of instead of imitating badly things Japanese.

    Being proud of something, and selling it to other culture are two very different things. I was frustrated because I think you know this,

    Two things are different for sure. My question was why Korean people did not sell things they are so proud of instead of imitating things Japanese?

    your question was merely a show-off and a put-down. “We’ve made it…why can’t you…why can’t you…why can’t you?”

    Don’t take that way. I have nothing to show off. And I don’t show off just because some Japanese goods are selling;it has nothing to do with me, though I have seen some Korean people showing off Hyundai, Samusn; I am afraid you might be projecting.

    “We’ve made it…why can’t you…why can’t you…why can’t you?”

    You are quoting me wrong. My question was:Korean people are so proud of things Korean, why can’t they sell it to the western world.
    And another question was , why they are imitating things Japanese when they are generally anti-Japanese.
    And my speculation was they do as they do because Korean people had love-hate mentality toward Japan.
    Your answer seems to be it is against the western concept, which, in my view, might be obstacle but not reason for doing as they do.

    Dokdo/Comfort Women/Sea of Japan is about colonization, and anything about Japan’s ’stay’ early last century falls along the same line.

    Not exactly. Dokdo, and the sea of Japan has nothing to do with the colonizations;it is just that Korean people want to relate it to the colonization misleadingly because , without historical and legal grounds, that is the only way they can (misleadingly ) appeal to the public.

    I’m not really sure what you meant there. And, “the hundred of examples,” I would rather read ONE(well, I appreciate if you give me more than just that one) from you.

    (1)education
    http://b.hatena.ne.jp/entry/1995090
    (2)Politics http://www.rjkoehler.com/2006/07/24/i-guess-there-really-is-an-axis-of-evil-member-in-ne-asia/
    http://http://rokdrop.com/2007/04/06/abe-bush-discuss-sex-slave-issue/www.rjkoehler.com/2006/08/07/seoul-ignores-shrine-visits/
    I think these examples goes to show Koreans are in general anti-Japan.
    BTW what is your explanation that the blogger of the most popular blog in Korea dare not mention the nationality of Miss Universe?
    thanks.

  16. comment number 16 by: Ken

    A dialogue translated through software about laver of Japan and Korea in a blog (just for your reference)

    “I seaweed?
    It is absolutely useless from South Korea.
    It is only salty, and seaweed is also thin, and it doesn’t encounter rice.
    There is hardly a smell even if it parches it.”

    “When it is made to say to one Korean people in Japan generation of my acquaintance, it seems to be this.. “The South Korea seaweed is the lowest seaweed. ” though laughs. Waracanojo (one’s forties) reason「There is not massaging it being able to eat Maz. As for seaweed in Japan, it is too delicious, and the South Korea seaweed is not good to eat at all. Seaweed in Japan is fragrant. 」Let’s put it out.

    This person says that there are no sesame oil in South Korea and North Korea.

    A terrible, good smell does sesame oil in Japan. The feature in the sesame oil South Korea and from Korea is not to do by the smell at all.
    Laughed ?

    It seems to be sesame oil that it is pleased most in South Korea and North Korea as the souvenir from Japan.
    Saying ..turning over.. , “When coming back to the motherland, sesame oil is fully taken home” of her of 1 generation in Japan lives is put out.”

  17. comment number 17 by: GarlicBreath

    kjeff Says:

    June 1st, 2007 at 10:21 pm
    GarlicBreath,
    I think is unfair for you knowing my name, and me not knowing yours. I won’t respond until that’s settled.

    I hope I can trust your word on that.

  18. comment number 18 by: GarlicBreath

    What is Kofoo? Korean food. Just look at all the Korean food:

    kimbap is korean style sushi

    So is the reverse true? Sushi is Korean style kimpap… lol

    Yaki udon is Korean???? nope..
    What is tobu cho bap? That is Korean? nope its called inarizushi.

    eel dup bop? Never heard of it. But it sure looks like unagidon.

    More koreans pretending to be Japanese. Why not sell only Korean food, and see how many people like it, and stop “borrowing” Japanese culture.

  19. comment number 19 by: Ken

    Ther is big gap on hygine sense between Japan and Korea.
    Can anyone explain following photograph of Kimchi process?
    Is it good for fermentation or so though even docile Kenny will not be convnced anyway?
    http://a-odagiri.seesaa.net/image/83608387839383L83808360.jpg

  20. comment number 20 by: kjeff

    ponta,
    I think we just have different views on how ‘real’ culture differences are. I believe they are extensive, and often difficult to overcome.

    I was living in the US in the 80’s and it is far from the truth that there was the popularity of “everything’ Japanese.

    I think you may have taken my words too literally. I wish I can provide you with some evidence, but there’s no denying the surge of popularity of Japanese culture in the 70s and early to mid 80s. More colleges were offering Japanese language course, and there were probably tons of books published on Japanese management style, and culture in general. Japanese cars export was at its height(for the era), which led to self-imposed quota for fears of U.S. backlash. I think there was one Chinese-American assaulted and subsequently died because he was mistaken for a Japanese, or am I confusing this with something else? You can actually still these in 70s and 80s sci-fi movies which have a lot of ‘Japan/Japanese culture is the future’ undertone.(on the other hand, the “Firefly” series and its movie “Serenity” have their character speaking Chinese)
    .
    I guess in general we just have to agree to disagree.
    BTW, while I found that “education” video that you linked is at the very the least “disturbing”, it’s still on the same old issue of Dokdo. Did you notice how manipulative the background music was?(I’m not trying to take anything away from the content, just how it’s presented) The other links, again, same old issues, comfort women, yakuzuni, come on… I’ll give you an example, I’ve heard some Koreans saying that Chinese people are dirty, greedy(kind of ironic), liars, or thiefs, and etc. Or, Chinese stuffs are garbage. Tell me if you can provide a similar example.

  21. comment number 21 by: jjok

    They are still in Imperialize Movement by themselves.

  22. comment number 22 by: GarlicBreath

    but there’s no denying the surge of popularity of Japanese culture in the 70s and early to mid 80s

    .

    Not true….

    Japan was on the radar, and there was a huge backlash.

    The reason why Japanese food is wildly popular in the USA and around the world is because its really really good. This is why Koreans bend over backwards to pretend to be japanese. Korean food will never be popular to non koreans. Its just not that good.

  23. comment number 23 by: ponta

    Kjeff
    Surely we can agree to disagree.
    And rememberI gave you a chance before to make a fresh start after you responded emotionally.

    I think we just have different views on how ‘real’ culture differences are. I believe they are extensive, and often difficult to overcome.

    I also think there are cultural difference; But your grounding on DNA for the claim is going too far and not justified. Your claim comes down to say the western people will not accept things Korean because it is built in their DNA;that seems absurd.

    BTW, while I found that “education” video that you linked is at the very the least “disturbing”, it’s still on the same old issue of Dokdo. Did you notice how manipulative the background music was?(I’m not trying to take anything away from the content, just how it’s presented) The other links, again, same old issues, comfort women, yakuzuni, come on… I’ll give you an example,

    Again I am afraid you misinterpret the sites linked.
    Kids’s drawings are not just about Dokdo but the point is they are educated to hate Japan.
    The other links are not just about Yasukuni and comfort women. But as far as Yasukuni and comfort women are concerned, if you contrast South Korean attitude toward North Korea with that toward Japan,
    it is obvious they are anti-Japan. They take sunshine policy on North Korean war shrine, and North Korean comfort women probably because North Korea is too crazy or North Koreans are their brethren.
    And a politician calling Japan “truly evil” wile calling KJI a good guy ,frankly speaking ,is crazy.
    In any case generally speaking they are pro-North Korea but they are anti-Japan.
    And here are some other instances that exemplify the fact Koreans are anti-Japan.
    http://koreasparkling.wordpress.com/2007/06/03/miss-universe-and-ugry-rumors/
    http://koreasparkling.wordpress.com/2007/06/03/what-is-this-stake-or-typical-korean-persecution-complex/
    It is interesting that you didnt answer the question why the blogger of the most popular blog in Korea dare not mention the nationality of Miss Universe. It seems obvious he didn’t mention it because that would bring about jealousy, love-hate mentality, among Koreans and because Korean would make fuss about it. (And in fact they did).
    As for China, yes, there might be Koreans who said things like that and there are some Koreans who said similar things about Japan/Japanese.(for that matter, there are Japanese who say things like that about China and Korea.)
    But notice how non-Korean person views Korean attitude toward China.
    http://www.lostnomad.org/2007/05/14/china-the-benevolent-older-brother/

    Has anyone else noticed how matters are handled more “delicately” and “diplomatically”when it comes to the Chinese?

  24. comment number 24 by: ponta

    Here is an article I happen to find.
    http://www.chosunonline.com/article/20050119000022

    「日本を馬鹿にする国は地球上で韓国しかない」

    Korea is the only country on the earth that despise Japan

    says a Korean singer. He is not ill-intended. But notice he presupposes at the least that Koreans generally despise Japan.

  25. comment number 25 by: yungbe

    As a member of the family who has run a Japanese, Chinese, and Korean restaurants in the past… The reason why Koreans don’t venture outside of Koreatown with their Korean cuisine is… profit is near nil to none.

    In the back of the kitchen, Korean cuisine is the restaurant manager’s nightmare (at least in U.S.): To even have a semi-legitimate menu, the investments that you have to make is gigantic. Where I live (AZ), Korean restaurants run about $16~$24 per person (assuming dinner). Taking out all the costs, the Korean restaurants make about 1/5 ~ 1/10 of the profit that a Japanese restaurant can make. So, to make any kind of money, Korean restaurant owners are forced to stay in Koreatown, where customers are almost guaranteed, as opposed to outside, where they have to compete with other cuisines (which they can’t win, since the profit margin is razor thin). Or, they can take the easy way out: go get yourself a Chinese or Japanese restaurants.

    There you go. That argument is settled. (insert garlicbreath: “Koreans are [blah blah blah]”) and now ACTUAL discussion can start.

  26. comment number 26 by: GarlicBreath

    Thanks yungbi for trying to answer why Korean food is not common outside of Koreatown. However you are wrong. Korean food is not popular outside of Koreatown because almost all non korean don’t like the taste of Korean food.

    You are making some claims but have provided no evidence of what you are saying. Please come back with something more concrete.

    What is the profit margin of Korean food? And Japanese food for example. Yunbi, you may have some bias because you are a Korean who has pretened to be Japanese:

    As a member of the family who has run a Japanese, .. restaurants

    Maybe this was shameful.

    (insert garlicbreath: “Koreans are [blah blah blah]”)

    I ask you nicely not to make trolling comments.

  27. comment number 27 by: yungbe

    Lol I’m a Korean who pretended to be Japanese? Oh, because my family ran a Japanese restaurant, and we are apparently ashamed by it. I see. Thanks for generalizing me into your narrow view of what a Korean is. (Btw… best teppanyaki in the whole entire state!… at least, I liked to think so…)

    I am offering a personal experience of being involved with the three cuisines. And as opposed to you just going “people don’t like Korean food”? I love this transition from baseless claims to attacking me of giving baseless claims:

    However you are wrong. Korean food is not popular outside of Koreatown because almost all non korean don’t like the taste of Korean food.

    You are making some claims but have provided no evidence of what you are saying. Please come back with something more concrete.

    Lol, and I’m biased because I said Korean cuisine is not profitable? If I was a mindless, Hwabyung-ridden Korean like the rest of Koreans apparently are, shouldn’t I be going something like “NO! Korean cuisine is awesome! It makes so much money! Japanese cuisine sucks! Japanese sucks!”?

    Now if you’ll excuse me, I think I’ll go ahead and suck on some of that fermented- excuse me, rotten radish with bunch of peppers and garlics on it.

  28. comment number 28 by: pacifist

    I didn’t know but there has been a discussion on the origin of “kimbap and norimaki”.
    http://bbs.enjoykorea.jp/tbbs/read.php?board_id=pfood&nid=46248
    .
    I personally think laver may have been Korean (or Chinese?) origin but norimaki had some effect on kimbap during the annexation era, especially the style making with fine bamboo screen and how to cut them.
    Norimaki originated in Edo period while sushi itself had longer history. Does someone know how old kimbap was? Any old documents?

  29. comment number 29 by: GarlicBreath

    Kimbob was invented by a Japanese American.

    Now if you’ll excuse me, I think I’ll go ahead and suck on some of that fermented- excuse me, rotten radish with bunch of peppers and garlics on it.

    Suck away dude.

    But please be civil. I didn’t accuse you of being:

    a mindless, Hwabyung-ridden Korean like the rest of Koreans apparently are

    Your words.

    My words are lets stay on topic and be civil.

  30. comment number 30 by: pacifist

    kjeff,
    .

    Again I am afraid you misinterpret the sites linked.
    Kids’s drawings are not just about Dokdo but the point is they are educated to hate Japan.

    I agree with this opinion by ponta.
    I think all the culprit that caused the cold relationship between Korea and Japan was education in Korea. I hope this will be corrected for the future good relationship of both countries.
    .
    Please read the following opinion. It is an example of normal opinions in western countries to see the pictures that Korean childred drew.

    It is hard to believe that the teachers, who are supposed to provide their students with correct knowledge and equal viewpoint, allowed, or even encouraged them to draw these ugly works. It looks like Korean teachers stopped to think rationally and just propagating government-made hatred against Japanese.

    In most Western civilized country, students have freedom to choose from several different textbooks. Some are slightly right, some are slightly left, and kids will be differ in their viewpoint, but nobody will blame others for what they believe. That is democracy.

    However, in both Koreas, (and not to mention in communist China), they allow only one government-made textbook. Kids are forced to believe what are written in their one-and-only textbook. And of course, textbooks will be freely re-written by their government at their convenience whatever the historical facts. Thus, sadly, kids are brainwashed very efficiently enough to draw these ugly pictures.

    I believe, what we are seeing here is a Korean version of the “brainwashing the kids with distorted history” that happened in China in ’90s. In China, it resulted in recent anti-Japanese riots by youngsters. So maybe we will see similar things happen in Seoul in 2010’s. In this context, I think we should not be naive to believe that Korea is a true democratic country. It rather is a totalitarian state. And we should be aware that, it is highly possible that South Korea will be absorbed into China-North Korea complex in the near future and become an enemy of Western democratic countries.

  31. comment number 31 by: pacifist

    ponta,
    .

    Here is an article I happen to find.
    http://www.chosunonline.com/article/20050119000022

    Wasn’t the author, Cho Yong-nam (sorry if I misspelt), forced to apologise before tv cameras because of this book he wrote? I’ve heard that he had to resign his job bcause of the book. (Anyway, it seems that jin-il-pa must keep silent to live in the Korean society….)

  32. comment number 32 by: kjeff

    ponta,

    And rememberI gave you a chance before to make a fresh start after you responded emotionally.

    I don’t respond to comments emotionally, not even to GarlicBreath’s, and I think I’ve made myself perfectly clear on that earlier. It’s all fun, ponta. When I wrote that your opinion was “silly”, it’s because I believed it was so, and/or that I didn’t want to use a more direct and pointed word.

    I also think there are cultural difference; But your grounding on DNA for the claim is going too far and not justified. Your claim comes down to say the western people will not accept things Korean because it is built in their DNA;that seems absurd.

    I didn’t mean human DNA, because that would be ‘silly'(my favorite word of the month). LOL… It’s the food culture’s. Hmmm, I didn’t know that you held me in a such low regard.

  33. comment number 33 by: randomcow

    It means that to be fair, the Japanese government will actually have to ‘evaluate’ all of them, which is to say impossible.

    Los Angeles managed to give a cleanliness rating to every single one of her restaurants.

    RC

  34. comment number 34 by: straycat

    The conclusion: Ausies will be accused by Koreans fifty years from now, because forcing them i) to run Japanese restaurants, ii) to work in the dirty working environment, iii) to ignore the fact the running rats are actually being used foodstuff in the Korean foods, and of course all these are against the Korean’s will.

    P.S. Ausies are also guilty for forcing Korean women be prostitutes….