Occidentalism
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Ignorant Reporter Attacks Colbert’s Comedy Video

May 12th, 2007 . by Gerry-Bevers

A Korean reporter, who apparently is quite poor in English, has written an article, here, attacking a Stephen Colbert comedy video that pokes fun at the fact that Korean pop singer “Rain” beat Colbert out for the “number one” spot on Time Online‘s “The Most Influential People in The World.” (Link to Video)

If you watch the video and compare it to what the reporter wrote, which I have translated below, you will notice that the reporter did not understand much of the comedy routine and suggested that Colbert was cursing and ridiculing Rain. Notice the parts where the reporter wrote “xxxx,” which suggests cursing.

If Colbert had consulted with Jay Leno, he would have probably learned that many Koreans do not know how to take a joke, especially an American joke.

American Comedian, Mocks & Disparages Singer Rain 

[Seoul=Newsis] “Eternally modest? XXXX….”

Popular American comedian Stephen Colbert (43) has come out with an open attack on singer “Rain” (25).

Through his variety show, “Colbert on Demand,” Colbert has ridiculed Rain, who was selected as number one on Time Online’s “World’s 200 Most Influencial People.” [sic]

First, Colbert took issue with the words “Endless Effort, Endless Endurance, Endless Modesty,” which is written on Rain’s Web site.

He said he was “infinitely” more modest than him, and then insulted him by saying, “Hey, from now on I will call you xxxx.”

Then he said, “Now it is time for it to rain inside you,” [sic] and then did a parody music video of Rain’s “Way to Escape the Sun.”

Wearing the same clothes and sunglasses as Rain in his music video, Colbert used the music of “Way to Escape to Sun,” and sarcastically sang, “Look, honey. Get in my Hyundai car. Look, honey, let’s also eat kimchi together, you and me together.” He especially stressed, “He’s singing in Korean.”

The scene in the music video, “Ways to Escape the Sun,” where Rain throws a picture frame also suffered. Colbert threw a “Time” magazine with Rain’s picture on it through a window.

On the list of “200 Most Influential people, which was published on Time Online on the 4th, Rain got number one, beating Colbert by 200,000 votes. Rain got 470,740 votes, and Colbert got 278, 381.

Reporter Lee Seung-yeong, sylee@newsis.com

Lee Seung-yeong (Reporter)

Link to the Korean Article


72 Responses to “Ignorant Reporter Attacks Colbert’s Comedy Video”

  1. comment number 1 by: Newshound

    Hold on, Brian.

    I appreciate the support, but there ain’t no such thing as “western common sense”. And we have no idea if anyone on this site is a Japanese nationalist.

    I’m not arguing with nationalists, I’m not arguing with the Japanese, I’m arguing with Ken. (With Garlicbreath’s squeaky little inanities popping up in the background every now and then.)

  2. comment number 2 by: General Tiger

    Ken:

    Koreans have tendency to regard the joke making fun of them as the attack to them without dijesting the meaning like the dog of Pavlov.
    Similar offensive character is seen on abused pesons.
    I think Koreans aggressive character and the high ratio of hereditary mental illness is related to long slavery history to China.

    If I follow your logic, it is in the Japanese nature to be a copycat and a cowardly follower of the strongest force.

    Entertaining to see you look over my previous comment and go straight to blabbering illogical statements.

  3. comment number 3 by: minami562

    So doesn’t anyone else find it odd that a Korean pop star who is pretty much unheard of anywhere in the western world beat out the likes of Stephen Colbert, Jon Steward, and J.K. Rowling? Hell, what has Rain done that Bono hasn’t?

    Half a million votes? Did an entire percent of Korea vote for this guy when the next ten candidates’ votes put together barely add up to 1/3 of a percent of the US population? (I’m not even going to count Japan or Europe)

    Smells like the Tashiro incedent in 2001, except the Koreans got away with it, and they genuinely think that the world loves Rain.

  4. comment number 4 by: minami562

    General Tiger:

    If I follow your logic, it is in the Japanese nature to be a copycat and a cowardly follower of the strongest force.

    I think you’re confusing Japan with Korea.

  5. comment number 5 by: kjeff

    HanComplex,
    1. “exportation of whores”: I haven’t seen Korean prostitutes featured prominently in popular culture. Maybe I haven’t watched much TV/Movies these days, but I certainly remember watching Eastern European, Latin American, and Chinese prostitutes featured in ripped-from-the-headline Law and Order, and its derivatives. On the other hand, you’ll often see Korean deli owner, drycleaner, and nerd varieties, or musician stereotypes in pop culture.
    2. “poorly made cars”: You either haven’t been in the market for car in 3 years, or you ‘ve been walking to work. As early as 2004, J.D. Power initial quality rating ranked Hyundai second, tied with Honda, just behind Toyota.
    3. “immigrating from their homeland”: Again, I’ve never heard of Koreans invading the U.S. Unfortunately, and rather unfairly I think, we often heard about Mexicans invading.
    4. “Choi Seung-Hui”: He’ll be forever remembered; he as a Korean, probably not. Sadly, I think only racist-inclined people like you will remember him more for the country he was born than for what he did.
    5. “fermented cabbage”: Now, I’m a little confused. Is there something wrong with Kimchi? Not much of a fan of the ‘old’ kimchi, but I love the ‘new’ one, and I certainly wouldn’t mind Korea be known for it.

  6. comment number 6 by: Brian

    I apologize if I over-emphasized what you were saying Newshound, but if you read back through the history of comments in this site, you will see that my statements are warranted.

  7. comment number 7 by: void

    Well, who is Rain?

  8. comment number 8 by: kjeff

    minami562,

    So doesn’t anyone else find it odd…

    I’m pretty sure there are many enthusiastic Korean voters out there, but things are won by those who participate, no?

    that a Korean pop star who is pretty much unheard of anywhere in the western world beat out the likes of Stephen Colbert, Jon Steward, and J.K. Rowling? Hell, what has Rain done that Bono hasn’t?

    A bit western-centric don’t you think? I’m pretty sure the ‘eastern’ world makes up more than half the world’s population, and that is certainly more than western world. *This is perhaps to your surprise, but did you know that they have access to the internet in Asia too, like the rest of the western world?* I agree with Andy Lau’s comment on this one(and rather dissapointed that Rain’s people don’t), Asia is a big enough world.


  9. […] Link to a previous post on the incident […]

  10. comment number 10 by: Ken

    General Tiger,
    I am sorry but I do not understand what you meant. Your previous comment? I am not stalking after you, though.

  11. comment number 11 by: minami562

    kjeff,
    Asia does make up a huge chunk of the Earth’s population, but you’re seriously overestimating Rain’s popularity. Do you seriously think Chinese, Indian, Japanese, Taiwanese, or Thai internet users would bother to vote for a Korean pop singer when they could be voting for Shigeru Miyamoto or King Bhumibol Adulyadej? (His Majesty’s results, I could believe, considering his standing in Thailand) You can’t possibly be that blind or arrogant.

    How many Asian internet users are fluent enough in English to take an interest in time.com anyway? It doesn’t even look like it has a Chinese, Japanese, or even Korean version of the site. The only thing that would draw such a large non-english speaking crowd to time.com would be an organized effert to flood time.com with votes… or rather, there was no crowd at all! Just a group of zealous fans trying to convince the world that they (the world) love Rain!

    On top of that, America’s internet population is 211 million, compared to Korea’s 34 million. That’s not even counting Europe. What makes you think anything but an organized, ballot-spamming project would put Rain in first on an English-only site populated by an English-speaking popultaion more than 6 times their size?

    The point is, Rain is not as popular as Koreans would like to think he is. This is just another one of Korea’s spam attacks, like the one they did to crash the FIFA site in 2006.

  12. comment number 12 by: kjeff

    minami562,

    I’m pretty sure there are many enthusiastic Korean voters out there, but things are won by those who participate, no?

    If you read my comment, you’d see that I was conceding your point already. And I did suggest that polls are won by those who put that “effort”, and what wrong with having “zealous fans” out there? The Time poll is not scientific by any means, but even if it doesn’t correctly measure Rain’s numerical fans, their intensity well made up for it, no? Would you rather have one fan who buys ten cds, or ten fans who buy one?

    that a Korean pop star who is pretty much unheard of anywhere in the western world

    My comment on Asia was speficic to what the fragment you wrote above. In short, you don’t really need to be “heard” in the western world to be ‘heard’ anymore(Not saying that Rain is, don’t know much about him). If you can get the ‘love’ of half of China’s population for example, you are, in fact, getting more ‘love’ than half of the U.S and the E.U combined, no?

  13. comment number 13 by: HanComplex

    The hate oozes out of every word in your sentence structure, so stop hiding it under that innocent, but obvious guise. Or as Newshoud would say stop being a “racist masquerading as an intellectual.” hahaha

    Hmm.. so how does hate “ooze out” of a “sentence structure?” Is it gel-like as in toothpaste out of a tube, or more viscous like 10W40 motor oil? I guess if it embarrasses Koreans and makes them lose face it has to be fueled by hate. Terrific logic. Oh yeah, nice generalization of those who don’t agree with you as “Japanese nationalists.” “Warranted,” no doubt.
    I know you don’t want to hear or believe about Korean women being prostitutes in the US, but sorry to break the news to you, pal.

    according to one Korean government official cited by the JoongAng Ilbo, the Los Angeles Police Department suspects some 8,000 Korean women have entered the United States to practice the World’s Oldest Profession since 2004. In particular, since Korea’s Special Law on the Eradication of Prostitution went into effect in September 2004, the number of working girls fleeing to the United States via Canada and Mexico has been climbing.

    http://www.rjkoehler.com/?p=3088
    I guess you can do like an ostrich and bury your head in the sand. Then it doesn’t happen or not true.

    Half a million votes? Did an entire percent of Korea vote for this guy when the next ten candidates’ votes put together barely add up to 1/3 of a percent of the US population? (I’m not even going to count Japan or Europe)
    Smells like the Tashiro incedent in 2001, except the Koreans got away with it, and they genuinely think that the world loves Rain.

    minami,
    I think Rain’s Korean fans voted for him in droves, most likely inspired by a nationalist streak. Koreans don’t like losing, as you probably know, and would do anything to be No. 1 even if it’s just some lousy popularity contest. This desperate desire indicates an insecurity complex as Gerry had previously mentioned. Even if they did deserve to lose, they’d still insist in being the winners. Remember the Apolo Ohno, World Cup, and other sporting incidents and the resulting Korean protests? When you have full-grown adults acting like immature bratty kids as the norm you know something’s just screwed up with the culture. It’s kinda sad, really.

  14. comment number 14 by: GarlicBreath

    Brian said:
    I’m so glad for expats like you in Japan who can bring some western common sense into the fray

    What an arrogant asshole.

    Brian
    I remember the KKK would list out similar generalizations just before they lynch a black person.

    Jesus Fucking Christ MAN!!! Why didn’t you stop them. If you were standing there listening to the KKK, by invitation no doubt, and you watched a black man get lynced, why didn’t you stop it. You are a real piece of shit.

    Koreans tell me quite often that the KKK is running arund american under every rock, now I have heard from myself an American talking about it.

    You make me sick Brian. Go crawl back under your rock.

  15. comment number 15 by: kjeff

    GarlicBreath,
    “You shall not make wrongful use of the name of the LORD your God, for the LORD will not acquit anyone who misuses his name.”

  16. comment number 16 by: Brian

    HanComplex. It’s all in your WORD CONNOTATION. People can see into your heart with your choice of words. I see evil. Anyone else?

  17. comment number 17 by: Brian

    And Garlic-face cry me a F-ing River. Your retarded hate-filled words support my hope that other foreigners will see the image that you guys here present of Japan. Other people are capable of irrational generalization too. BTW, thanks for the kind words. Sure are entertaining. LOL

  18. comment number 18 by: Ken

    Chase; Thanks for your info. and sorry for delayed reply.
    Is the company completely private though such one is gov’t affiliate in Japan?
    Anyway, Japanese people merely mind, “Koreans are doing that again.” or so.
    The funny is they are using Japan originated character to claim against Japan.
    Well, you are the 2nd Korean who has modesty.
    The Japanese are generally modest but learnig that modesty to Koreans results in a loss.
    At negotiation, both parties should concede to come to term.
    But in case with Koreans, once agreed point becomes the next start line to concede.
    So the Japanese are deciding start line at extreme and without concession.
    Decades before, the Japanese had sympathy to Koreans on the military administration.
    But after the liberalization, Koreans’ anti-Japan behavior got worse and well-known over Japan at W-cup.
    I do not intend to force my view.
    I would like you to be practical, for example, studying history based on existing evidence.
    If you want to ovecome Japan, you had better know Japan and Chinese characters.
    Otherwaise, such mistake as exhibiting prostitute advertisement as the evidence of coercing is made or precious money is wasted as follows.
    http://j2k.naver.com/j2k_frame.php/japan/www.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200409/200409140176.html
    The Japanese are not believing such occultism.

  19. comment number 19 by: chase

    Ken
    “e-편한세상” is one of “대림건설” (Daelim Group)’s sub company. I don’t think gov. is affiliated and Korean government is ignorant enough to depict one country that degraded in gov. supported video even if there is some sensation of fake hostile toward Japan in Korea. You might have mistaken reading th e following article. This is a fake article written by a netizen after viewing the video.
    http://blog.naver.com/yong2794?Redirect=Log&logNo=150003664760&vid=0
    I’m really interested in running Chinese/Japanese though I don’t have much time right now. I really hope I can in the near future.
    BTW about your picture, what is it really? Some people have told me about it before and they told me the same thing as the article. I agree with you that it is hard to believe that such occult would exist. However it is sad that those posts were planted on mountains. Was it the most efficient way to measure land?
    Is the second paragraph(about the building) of the answerer of the question of below site true?
    http://j2k.naver.com/j2k_frame.php/japan/kin.naver.com/db/detail.php?d1id=11&dir_id=110101&eid=ZJ2DpzkjdHY+3Kg6NpPI5E2ZjrLT90CW&qb=wM/BpiC4u7bS

  20. comment number 20 by: chase

    I don’t believe that Rain is popular worldwide at all. Yu-na Kim (figure skater) must be much more famous.

  21. comment number 21 by: Ken

    Chase,
    Thanks for quick reply.
    I appreciate your detailed explanation but you do not have to worry that much.
    That does not matter to me.
    The pile is true and Korean gov’t is still looking for them and extracting one by one with spending hundreds million dollars.
    Almost 100 yeras have passed and the persons concerned were gone as well.
    There must be no way other than driving such piles at that era to measure land because they did not have GPS system.
    I am sorry not to be able to answer about the paragraph because it does not come up.
    Anyway, one thing I can clearly state is that Korea is loosing one friend.
    I tried your add but was rejected so a little private here.
    I have been to Seoul once and I felt uncomfortable atmosphere.
    On the other hand, I have been to Taiwan 8 times and would like to visit there again.
    Both of them were annexed to Japan at the era likewise.
    What was different? Probably each reception.

  22. comment number 22 by: ponta

    chase

    I agree with you that it is hard to believe that such occult would exist.

    Does the talk have something to with
    “”Japan’s Cruel Imperial Past Revealed?