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Japan Focus: “Hating ‘The Korean Wave’’’ Comic Books: A sign of New Nationalism in Japan?

October 5th, 2007 . by Gerry-Bevers

Here is a link to a really long article in the online magazine, Japan Focus:

“Hating ‘The Korean Wave’’’ Comic Books: A sign of New Nationalism in Japan?

I honestly could not finish the article, not only because it is so long, but also because it seems to essentially ignore the evidence that says that Korea, and maybe China, is most responsible for much of the “new nationalism” in Japan. I do not feel like arguing the points right now, but I wanted to post the link for those who might be interested.


19 Responses to “Japan Focus: “Hating ‘The Korean Wave’’’ Comic Books: A sign of New Nationalism in Japan?”

  1. comment number 1 by: empraptor

    Korea and China “made” Japan nationalistic – yet more reason to hate Korea and China? Why those scoundrels, Japan has no choice but to become yet more nationalistic. Boo hoo.

    Call Koreans and Chinese on it when they do dumb and ugly things. But it’s another thing to blame them because Japanese follow along doing dumb and ugly things. Doesn’t this post reduce to “but they did it first”?

  2. comment number 2 by: kjeff

    Gerry,

    I honestly could not finish the article, not only because it is so long, but also because it seems to essentially ignore the evidence that says that Korea, and maybe China, is most responsible for much of the “new nationalism” in Japan.

    This…after your uninformed comment, or rather, question, of the movie “The Host” prior to watching it. Gotta admit, you’re on a roll here.
    .
    Reading the abstract again(although it may very well be because I actually finished the article), you get the impression that the authors is less interested in the content -of the ‘new’ nationalism- than the medium it’s transmitted. I think their use of multi-layered contexts of ‘us versus them’ dichotomy of not only Korea vs. Japan, but Hanryu Korea vs. ‘True’ Korea, Mainstream media vs. Internet/Manga, or School learning vs. Self learning are particularly interesting. Come on, read further…
    .
    If an intellectual(gotta be, right… being a teacher and all) such as yourself, whose first language is English(which may be a problem for second language user such as myself) formed an opinion before finishing the examined article, then…well…
    .
    BTW…
    Matt and Gerry,
    I don’t know if you have been reading GarlicBreath’s recent comments, but since you haven’t said anything, is it OK to guess you don’t disprove the language he used?

  3. comment number 3 by: Gerry-Bevers

    Kjeff,

    I post here, but it is not my blog, so I do not ban people.

    Personally, I do not approve of or like many of GarlicBreath’s comments, and I rarely, if ever, respond to them. However, I get the feeling that you would miss him if he were banned since you do respond to him.

  4. comment number 4 by: kjeff

    Gerry,

    However, I get the feeling that you would miss him if he were banned since you do respond to him.

    Most definitely…as I said before, GarlicBreath is probably my main reason frequenting this blog.

  5. comment number 5 by: kjeff

    GarlicBreath,

    Personally, I do not approve of or like many of GarlicBreath’s comments, and I rarely, if ever, respond to them.

    Ouch…Massa does not approve.

  6. comment number 6 by: General Tiger

    My point of view:
    A few old Japanese geezers started things by wishing for the old Dai Nippon Teikoku, Koreans/Chinese got pissed and “attacked” all of Japan, and then we have backlash.
    .
    The vicious cycle of hate.

  7. comment number 7 by: GarlicBreath

    Mr Bevers and Mr Matt, if I use language you dissaprove of, please let me know and I will stop.

    Ouch…Massa does not approve.

    I am glad to see that Mr Bevers has regained his credibilty in your eyes. Also, saying (please excuse my use)”ma**a” is offensive as it mocks slavery and is offensive to black Americans. Please don’t use that word.

  8. comment number 8 by: GarlicBreath

    However, I get the feeling that you would miss him if he were banned since you do respond to him.

    Well said Mr Bevers. You really have to take his comments with a grain of salt. As you have noted he speaks with a forked tongue.

  9. comment number 9 by: Sweet Water

    Based on my quick research on the web, the comic book series “Kenkanryu” is nothing to do with “Hanryu.” For some reason, however, the Korean media wishfully believe that the Japanese are jealous about the Korean wave. The authors of this article seem to make the same mistake. The title “Hating the Korean Wave” is simply wrong, and it should be something like “The Anti-Korea Wave.”

    Another mistake of the authors is that they seem to generalize too easily the Japanese anti-Korea sentiment as Japanese nationalism as well as xenophobia, as some Korean falsely believe they are the representative nation in Asia. I may be wrong because I’ve read the abstract, conclusion, and section heads. Yet, in my observation, the Kenkanryu is mostly the Japanese reply (counter arguments) to the anti-Japanese propaganda made by Korean media.

    Although the Japan Focus is claimed to be a peer-reviewed journal, the quality of the present paper seems to be, again, based on the abstract and conclusion, no better than an essay in a blog or an undergrad kid’s term paper. I would be surprized if essays like this were counted for their tenure decisions.

  10. comment number 10 by: ponta

    I haven’t read the article either ..

    But let me say this:

    As for which is the first, keep in mind that few Japanese took notice of Korea until they saw how Korean people fans behave in soccer game and how they demonstrate for Dokdo, both of which represent Korean nationalism.
    And it seems that in China and in Korea, nationalism is politically correct while in Japan it is largely regarded as politically incorrect.

    Looking back, I think Hate-Korea-wave was critical about and an reaction against Korean ethnic centrism and Japanese media that consciously or unconsciously turns blind eye to it.
    .

  11. comment number 11 by: Matt

    BTW…
    Matt and Gerry,
    I don’t know if you have been reading GarlicBreath’s recent comments, but since you haven’t said anything, is it OK to guess you don’t disprove the language he used?

    You are each others tar baby. What do you want me to do? How about this – you ask me to ban him and I will. Does that work?


  12. […] Gerry posted about a Japan Focus article about Kenkanryu – “The Hate Korea Wave”. […]

  13. comment number 13 by: kjeff

    SweetWater,

    The authors of this article seem to make the same mistake. The title “Hating the Korean Wave” is simply wrong, and it should be something like “The Anti-Korea Wave.”

    I can’t read Japanese(Well, in this case, Chinese), but the authors’ explanation on the title(No.1 on the footnote) seems to make sense.

    [1] The title means “Hating ‘The Korean Wave’” rather than ‘The Hating Korea Wave’, as indicated by the different color and font used for the letter ‘ken’, or ‘hate’).

    .

    Another mistake of the authors is that they seem to generalize too easily the Japanese anti-Korea sentiment as Japanese nationalism as well as xenophobia, as some Korean falsely believe they are the representative nation in Asia. I may be wrong because I’ve read the abstract, conclusion, and section heads. Yet, in my observation, the Kenkanryu is mostly the Japanese reply (counter arguments) to the anti-Japanese propaganda made by Korean media.

    My last count is 3, the number of people who commented on the article without actually reading the article.
    .
    Matt,
    Not my blog, is it? Aren’t you supposed to be the one who sets the rules? I love GarlicBreath; he’s fun. Would I want him to be the common voice(face it, he stands out) to casual readers of this blog(if it were mine), well, you decide…

  14. comment number 14 by: Matt

    Matt,
    Not my blog, is it? Aren’t you supposed to be the one who sets the rules? I love GarlicBreath; he’s fun. Would I want him to be the common voice(face it, he stands out) to casual readers of this blog(if it were mine), well, you decide…

    Yes, it is my blog, but you are the main person he is doing this back and forth with. I have not even been reading his comments.

  15. comment number 15 by: Brian

    We all know the reason this Manga was written and became popular is because of the jealously and insecurity of Japanese nationalists of Korean successes. These nationalists couldn’t stand the notion that Korean entertainment or “wave” was becoming such a following in Japan. It hurt their pride that Koreans were being idolized by their fellow Japanese and that even many of Japan’s most famous entertainers were zainichi Korean. On the other hand, their insecurity extended to the fact that Korea was competing and in many instances, surpassing Japan on the World’s technological products stage. For example, Samsung outperforming all Japan’s elite electronic makers or Korea’s shipbuilding industry. Finally, the fact that Korea fosters anti-Japanese sentiment was the final straw in hurting the Japanese nationalist’s only sense of pride (their nationalism), which put these insecure dimwits on a campaign to forever, irrationally hate and slander Korea.

    I’m sorry for people like Garlic-face whose only sense of self-esteem exists in the hope of Japanese superiority. It’s too bad that the Korean success will continue to rival Japan, since this will stimulate more jealousy and insecurity in these people undermining the only source of their pathetic self-esteem, their nationalism. Yes, I’m talking to people like you Garlic-face.

  16. comment number 16 by: alec931

    MATT: “How about this – you ask me to ban him and I will. Does that work?”

    Awesome! Ban GarlicBreath, please 😀

  17. comment number 17 by: egg

    Brian
    Are you living in Japan? What lead you to your interpretation? I am asking this because I live in Japan and my views are quite different to yours.

    These nationalists couldn’t stand the notion that Korean entertainment or “wave” was becoming such a following in Japan. It hurt their pride that Koreans were being idolized by their fellow Japanese and that even many of Japan’s most famous entertainers were zainichi Korean.

    I guess “Winter Sonata” which was the first piece of Korean wave in Japan, was good, as my mother was quite fond of it, saying “it`s fresh, but at the same time, there is some kind of nostalgy in it”. (I myself don`t watch TV dorama series so I am not quite sure.) She has continued to watch Korean dramas for some period.
    From my above experience, I have no hesitation to admit there was some kind of “Korean wave” in Japan. But at the same time, I could scarecely observe men or young women fascinated in this wave. And there is always an end in a craze.
    Even after the craze was over, TV broadcasting companies tried to follow this craze for some periods. People, especially young men who were not interested in the craze itself, wanted to watch other new kind of programs, so they were irritated.
    This is one of the reasons why Kenkanryu was published, in my point of view.
    And there are zainich artists but there are non-zainich artists too. I can`t understand why Japanese people should get upset about the situation.

    On the other hand, their insecurity extended to the fact that Korea was competing and in many instances, surpassing Japan on the World’s technological products stage. For example, Samsung outperforming all Japan’s elite electronic makers or Korea’s shipbuilding industry.

    About the economic and industrial reasoning of your interpretation, I would like to point out that, as far as I know, there is no major Japanese company that bankrupt because of a Korean rival company. At least among the ordinary Japanese people, I feel that the notion that Korean economy might be a threat against Japanese economy is not shared, so logically, there can be no irritation about that. And as long as the competition is fair, I believe Japanese people are willing and welcome to it.
    .
    These are my ideas but I would like to know where our views seperated, so I am looking forward to hear your views again.


  18. […] Post (and inevitable discussion thread) linking to Japan Focus article (5 October 2007) […]


  19. […] Post (and inevitable discussion thread) linking to Japan Focus article (5 October 2007) […]