Occidentalism
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Japan’s MOFA Updates Takeshima Web Pages

April 23rd, 2007 . by Gerry-Bevers

The following is a link to the updated, Takeshima-related pages on Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) Web site. I do not know how old the news is since I do not visit the site often, but I am posting it for those who have not seen it:

Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs Web page on Takeshima (Dokdo)


53 Responses to “Japan’s MOFA Updates Takeshima Web Pages”

  1. comment number 1 by: toadface

    Gerneral Tiger, Japan did not have to colonize Korea to “protect her interests” in Korea, but they did. You should understand the series of events during the Russo~Japanese War to see the truth.

    Japan attacked Russian ships in Chemulpo on February 8th 1904. From there they marched into Seoul and demanded Koreans sign the Japan~Korea Protocol. They were not called upon or asked for assisstance. In fact here is the message they sent to the Russians.
    http://www.dokdo-takeshima.com/Japanese-ultimatum2.jpg
    The Japan-Korea Protocol was more than just a defense pact it had other provisions.
    1. The establishment of permanent Japanese military and naval bases on Korean territory.
    2. The assumption of Japanese supervision over all Korean affairs.
    3. The assumption of Japanese supervision over Korean government finances.
    4. The acquisition of Japanese control over the Korean railway system.
    5. The acquisition of Japanese control over the Korean telephone, telegraph and mail systems.
    6. The “promotion” of Korean economic development.

    This means Korea was for all purposes a “colony” long before 1907 as some Japanse wrongly assert. It also shows that Korea had long since lost the means to protest Japanese activities as the Foreign Ministry was long since replaced. In August of 1904 the Japanese would place a pro-Japanese mouthpiece named Durham While Stevens (later assassinated) to conduct these affairs. No foreign contact could be made without approval from this department.

    Pacifist, not all western countries supported Japan during the Russo~Japanese War. I think America heavily financed Japan and the Engish showed open support but Russia had allies too until it was clear they would lose. France and Germany help Russia’s Baltic Fleet coal their way to Tsushima (sometimes covertly)

    The Japanese Navy clearly won these battles but you should understand the Russian Navy was a collection of incompetent, poorly trained, and armed with outdated poorly maintained equipment. The opinion that Japan was “an underdog” was very wrong and was more a Western stereotype of the past that an Asian nation could never defeat a white power.

    The story of Russia’s doomed Baltic Fleet is a tragedy. It is a must-read story and I strongly recommend a book written by A. Novikoff-Priboy in 1937. These men slogged 18,000 miles around the world in coal-powered ships to confront the Japanese Navy. Most of them were well-aware they were going to die. During target practices en route they couldn’t hit a bull in the ass in a bass fiddle but they pressed on to do their duty.

    Egg, from what I understand Korea was already occupying Dokdo when Japanese citizens were trying to land on the island or encroach on what they felt was their territory. This would be considered more of an act of defence rather than invasion or annexation such as Japan did.

    Japanese assert that Korea invaded Dokdo after WWII. The fact is, Japan signed treaties that stated she was to stop exercising authority over Liancourt Rocks. From a legal standpoint Japan had lost “effective control” over this island. By this acquiesence Koreans argue Dokdo was “terra nullius” or ownerless.

    Japan was bound by law to relinquish Dokdo and could not assert control over Dokdo unless the island was determined to be hers. Under the San Franciso Peace Treaty no decision was made on Dokdo Island. Korea was not signatory to the San francisco Peace Treaty and claimed Dokdo.

    In my opinion the US played both Korea and Japan on this. At the beginning the US wanted to give Dokdo to the Japanese because they were afraid that Korea would fall to the communists. Later, when America realized they could use ROK soil in a conflict with the communist North and China they softened.

  2. comment number 2 by: egg

    toadface thanks for the reply.
    I can`t understand why Japan threw away the island by the SanFrancisco treaty in which the island doesn`t appear. It was argued in the drafts but still decided to put off. Threfore I think it natural that Japan didn`t release dokto.
    Besides that,

    from what I understand Korea was already occupying Dokdo when Japanese citizens were trying to land on the island or encroach on what they felt was their territory.

    When did Korea start “occupying” while Japanese fishermen were freely fishing in the islands waters?

    From a legal standpoint Japan had lost “effective control” over this island. By this acquiesence Koreans argue Dokdo was “terra nullius” or ownerless.

    I don`t know what “terra nullius”means. Under the assumption that it means ownerless, though you shead blood to occupy it, if you thought the island is yours, will it become peaceful or peacetime act?
    “Ownerless” but Korea is “occupying”?
    Anyway, I think it is not so dificult to say “yes” or “no”. Please answer my question.

    Is killing foreign people by arms military or not? Didn`t the Korean government act militarily?

  3. comment number 3 by: pacifist

    toadface,
    .

    The fact is, Japan signed treaties that stated she was to stop exercising authority over Liancourt Rocks.

    .
    Stop lying around.
    SF peace Treaty indicated that Takeshima/Dokdo belonged to Japan.
    The islands which Japan would return to Korea excluded Takeshima/Dokdo, USA rejected Korean plea.
    .
    So they used force while Japan couldn’t fight back because she was occupied by united allies (mainly USA) and was banned to fight.
    Japan protested but the military Korea didn’t hear.
    toadface, please don’t distort history.