Occidentalism
Duc, sequere, aut de via decede!

Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Maps 2

September 1st, 2006 . by Gerry-Bevers

1882 Ulleungdo, an outside view & Seal Cave

The following map was made by Lee Gyu-won after his inspection of Ulleungdo in 1882. The name of the map is “Ulleungdo Woido” (鬱陵島外圖), which is written as 울릉도외도 in Korean and essentially means “an outside map (view) of Ulleungdo.” In other words, the map focuses on the shoreline and neighboring islands, islets, and rocks. Supposedly, there was also an “Ulleungdo Naedo” (鬱陵島內圖), which focused on the interior of the island, but I think it has been lost if it did exist.

Ulleungdo Woido (Full)

Notice how the mountain peaks slant inward, which suggests that you are viewing them from the “outside.” The overlapping mountains on the map show the number of ridges you must cross to get to the center of the island, which was a flat, open basin surrounded by mountains. It forms a kind of natural fortess in the center of the island.

Northwest Corner

I have divided the island up into four sections for better viewing. The map above is the northwest section. The above map shows two beaches where boats could land. The one on the upper right was called “Daehwangto-gumi” (大黃土邱尾), which means “Big Yellow Earth Beach.” I am not sure what “gumi” means, but I think it can be translated as “beach” or “landing.” The other beach was called “Hyangmok-gumi,” which means “Juniper Beach. That area used to have and may still have many juniper trees.

Just below Juniper Beach was place called Daepung-gumi (待風邱尾), which literally means “Waiting Wind Beach.” I think that was a way of referring to a cove, which offered protection to boats in stormy weather.

The other names on the map were referring to rock formations and smaller beaches. The rock formations still exist today. Here are some pictures of some of the rocks today:

You can also see two ponds on the above map. They were in the basin in the center of the island.

If you would like to see a good layout of Ulleungdo, here is a great map. If you click on “Zoom In”, you can move around the island with your mouse.

Northeast Section

The above map is the northeast section. There are three beaches on it, but the largest is labeled as Waeseonchang (倭船艙), which means, “Japanese boat dock.” That name suggests that either there were many Japanese on this part of the island, or that the Japanese had developed this beach in some way. The other two small beaches were Ungtong-gumi (雄通邱尾) and Seonpan-gumi (船板邱尾).

In front of Ungtong and Seonpan beaches, two islands appear on the map. The island near Ungtong beach is Dohang (島項), which means “Island Neck.” Today Dohang is Gwaneumdo. Gwaneumdo is only one island, but I think the 1882 map shows it as two in order to represent the finger of land that points to the island from the mainland. There is probably less than a 100 meters of water between Gwaneumdo and the mainland. The other island on the map is Jukdo (竹島), which is shown in front of Seonpan Beach. Today the island is still called Jukdo.

Here are pictures of some of the other rocks on the map:

  • Dae Am (大巖) was present-day Ddan Rock. Sanbong (蒜封), which means “Garlic Peak,” is also written next to this rock, so it may be another name for the rock.
  • Chokdae Am (燭臺巖) was present-day Gawui Rock (Scissors Rock).
  • Hyeongje Am (兄弟巖) means “Brothers’ Rock.” Today it is called Samseon Am, which means “Three Nymphs’ Rock.”

There is a rock next to Jukdo that I did not label because I could not recognize the middle character. I think the first character is “no” (老), which means “old,” and the third character is “am,” which means “rock.” Anyway, based on the shape of the rock, I would say it is present-day “Bukjeo Am,” which you can see here.

The map also shows what appears to be a path leading to the center of the island. It is called “Hongmunga” (紅門街), which mean “Red Gate Path.” Apparently, there were not many good paths leading to the center of the island, which probably explains why this one was labeled.

Southeast Section

The above map is the southeast section. This map shows a couple of beaches. The beach at the top of the map was called “Jeopo” (苧浦). Today I think it is called Jeodong Harbor. The beach at the bottom of the map was called “Dobangcheong” (道方廳). Today I think it is called Dodong Harbor.

There are only two rocks out in the water in the above map. One is called “Jaeng Am” (鎗巖), and the other is called “Janggun Am.” I think Jaeng Am means “Spear Rock,” which would seem to match its shape on the map. Janggun Am means “General Rock.” I am not sure where “Spear Rock” was, but I think General Rock was present-day “Chotdae Bawi,” which means “Candle Stick Rock.” You can see a picture of it here.

On the above map, you can also see the name of the basin in the center of the island. It was called “Nari-dong” (羅里洞) or Guk-dong (國洞). Today it is called “Nari Bunji” (Nari Basin).

Southwest Section 

The above map is the southwest section. It has several little inlets or beaches. Starting from the bottom there is Jangjakji (長斫之), Hyeonpo (玄浦), Tong-gumi (通邱尾), Gokpo (谷浦), Satae-gumi (沙汰邱尾), and Sohwangto-gumi (小黃土邱尾). The name Tong-gumi is still used today.

There are also two rocks shown on the map. They are “Hwa Am” (華巖) and “Bong Am” (鳳巖). Hwa Am may mean “Flower Rock,” and Bong Am means “Phoenix Rock.” Flower Rock was most likely present-day “Geobuk Bawui,” which means “Turtle Rock.” You can see a picture here. Bong Am was most likely present-day “Saja Bawui,” which means “Lion Rock.” You can see a picture here. I think Lee Gyu-won’s people did a good job of drawing the Turtle and Lion Rocks.

Finally, notice that there are three caves drawn in front of “Phoenix Rock” (Lion Rock). Only two of the caves are named, and of those two, I was only able to recognize the name of the middle one. The name of the middle cave was “Gaji-gul” (可支窟), which means “Seal Cave.” In Korean it is written as 가지굴. In a 1786 inspection of Ulleungdo, riflemen accompanying the inspectors killed two seals in front of one of the caves.

In the Dokdo/Takeshima debate, Korean historians claim that an island named “Gajido” (Seal Island) was a reference to “Dokdo,” but Japanese historians say that Gajido was just a neighboring island of Ulleungdo. I think Gajido was a reference to “Phoenix Rock,” which was near Seal Cave. The reason that I say this is not only because of the nearness of the rock to Seal Cave, but also because of the present-day name of the rock, which is “Lion Rock.” In Korean, a sea lion is called a “bada saja,” which literally means “sea lion.” I think sometime in the past Koreans changed the name from Phoenix Rock to Lion Rock because of all the seals or sea lions that used to live in the caves in that area.

Finally, here is a question to see if you have been paying attention. Of all the islands, islets, and rocks mentioned on the map, which one do you think might have been a reference to “Dokdo”?

Give up? Well, the people at the Kyujang Gak Institute at Seoul National University think that it might be “Elephant Rock,” but they cannot explain why it is located north of Ulleungdo. Here is what the Kyujang Gak Instutite said about the 1882 Ulleungdo map on its Web site:

작자·편년미상의 울릉도 내외형상을 그린 지도로서‚ 주변에 天刊地支로써 方位를 기입했고‚ 谷浦‚ 玄浦‚ 苧浦‚ 千年浦‚ 倭船艙‚ 道方廳‚ 竹島 등이 표시되어 있으며 待風邱尾를 비롯하여香木‚ 大黃土‚ 小黃土‚ 沙汰‚ 船板‚ 雄通 등 여러 邱尾가 표시되어 있다. 그 밖에 鳳巖‚ 華巖‚ 胄巖‚ 將軍巖‚ 兄弟巖‚ 燭臺巖‚ 虹霓巖‚ 鎗巖 등 여러 奇巖이 울타리 같이 둘러싸고 있다. 산세의 고준‚ 해안의 굴곡‚ 섬의 분도를 그림으로 잘 보여 주고 있다. 울릉도의 古地圖에서 특히 관심을 끄는 것은 獨島인데 이 지도에서는 獨島와 모양이 비슷한 섬을 虹霓巖이라 기록한 것이 주목되며 그것이 北쪽에 그려져 있다는 점이 이상하다.

I am too tired now to translate the whole thing, but I will translate the part in red:

In old maps of Ulleungdo, people are especially interested in “Dokdo.” In this map (the map above), Hongye Am (虹霓巖) draws attention because it looks similar to “Dokdo.” The fact that it is drawn to the north is strange.

You can find the above quote here.

What I think is strange is that Korean historians can look at almost any rock or island on a map and see “Dokdo.” How anyone with half a brain can look at the rock in question and suggest it is Dokdo is beyond my comprehension? Afterall, the rock is located off the north shore of Ulleungdo very close to to where Elephant Rock is. Not only that, the drawing on the map even looks like Elephant Rock. If the people at Seoul National University cannot add two plus two when it comes to reading maps, then what hope is there for ordinary Korean citizens?

By the way, if you are wondering how I got the names for all those places on the map, I did it by referencing Lee Gyu-won’s journal of his survey of Ulleungdo. I also referrenced the above Gyujang Gak Institute quote, which lists many of the placenames. Strangely enough, however, the writer forgot to mention “Seal Cave.” Luckily, I have the map in a book and magnifying glass, so I was able to figure it out.

Seoul National University has many maps online that can be closely inspected, but, strangely, the 1882 map is not among them, even though it is part of their collection. Why isn’t such an important map available for inspection on their Web site? I think it is because they do not want people to know that one of the caves is labeled Gaji-gul (Seal Cave). Has anyone seen it mentioned on the Web anywhere? Wouldn’t it be an important piece of evidence in the Dokdo/Takeshima debate?

Japanese Translation Provided by Kaneganese

(Gerryの投稿の日本語訳です。訳者注:漢字名が判明しない場所が多く、固有名詞に関しては現在調査中です。)1882年 鬱陵島の外観とアシカ洞窟以下の地図は、鬱陵島を視察した李奎遠が1882年に作成したものです。地図の名称は“鬱陵島外圖”です。韓国語では울릉도외도と書き、基本的に“鬱陵島の外観図”という意味です。言い換えると、この地図は海岸線、隣接する島々、小島や岩に焦点を当てて描かれているのです。以下の地図は鬱陵島を詳細に描写したものの一つです。少なくとも、現存しているもののうちの最も初期のものの一つ、と言えるでしょう。1750年頃に発行された韓国の地図帳です。海東地圖という名称です。“鬱陵島內圖” と言う島の内観に焦点を当てた地図もあったと考えられますが、もしそうなら、既に消失したと考えられます。 地図1:鬱陵島外圖山の頂が内部に向かって傾斜していることに注意して下さい。これは、外側から島へ向かって見ていると考えられます。重なり合う山々は、島の中心部へ行くためにいくつ山脈を越えれば、山に囲まれた開けた盆地になっている中心部に到達するか、を示しています。 地図2:北西部拡大図より見易くする為に島の地図を4分割しました。上掲の地図は北西部です。船が上陸できる入江が二つあることが確認出来ます。上部右側は“大黃土邱尾”で、“大きな黄色い土の入江” の意味です。“邱尾”が何を意味するのかよく分かりませんが、“砂浜”“上陸”と訳せると思います。〈後に、“入江”の意味であることが判明しました。*訳者注)もう一つの浜は、“香木邱尾” で、“ビャクシン入江”の意味です。その地域には、当時もそして現在もビャクシンの木が沢山あったかもしれません。

そのすぐ下には、“待風邱尾”があり、意味は“風を待つ入江”です。これは、荒天の時に船を避難させる入江を指しているのではないかと思います。

地図上で確認出来るその他の名称ですが、岩礁やより小さな浜辺を指しています。岩礁は、今日も存在しています。以下は、現在の岩の写真です。

倡優巖は現在のNoin岩〈老人岩?〉
虹霓巖は現在の孔岩もしくは象岩 鼻を水に突っ込んでいる象のように見えることに注目して下さい。
錐峰は現在のSonggot岩

上掲の地図に、小さな池が二つあるのも観察できます。島の中央の盆地の中にあります。

もしもっと鮮明な鬱陵島の配置図を見たければ、ここに素晴らしい地図があります。“Zoom In〈ズームイン)”をクリックすると、マウスで島を巡ることが出来ます。

 地図3:北東部拡大図

上掲の地図は北東部です。三つのがありますが、もっとも大きいのは“倭船艙”で、日本船ドックを意味します。名前から、日本人が沢山住んでいたか、彼らが何らかの形でこの浜を開発したことが推測されます。他の二つの小さな浜辺は、雄通邱尾と船板邱尾です。

その二つの浜辺に面して、二つの島が地図上に描かれています。雄通邱尾の近くにあるのは島項で、“島の首”を意味します。現在の観音島です。観音島は本来単一の島ですが、1882年の地図は、鬱陵島本島から島をゆび指している、その指の形を表すために、順番に二つ並べて描かれているのだと思います。観音島と本島とはおそらく100mも離れていないと思います。もう一つの島は竹島で、船板邱尾の前に描かれています。今日、でも竹嶼〈竹島の意味〉と呼ばれています。

地図上に描かれているその他の岩の写真をいくつか挙げます。
 ・大巖は今日のDdan岩で、蒜封は、“にんにくの先”を意味しますが、これはこの岩のすぐ横に書かれているので、岩の別名なのでしょう。
 ・燭臺巖は今日のザリガニ岩〈はさみ岩〉
 ・兄弟巖は今日の三仙岩です。意味は“三人の仙人の岩”です。

竹嶼の横にある岩は、何と書かれてあるか判別できませんでしたので、書き込みませんでした。最初の漢字は“老”で、三番目は“岩”だと思われます。それはともかく、形状からすると、現在の“Bukjeo岩”だと思います。ここでみることが出来ます。〈リンク〉

地図には、島の中央部に向かって道のようなものが伸びていることが確認出来ます。”紅門街”です。特にこの道に名前が記載されたのは、おそらく島の中央部へは余りよい道が少なかったためでしょう。

 地図4:南東部拡大図

上掲の地図は南東部です。浜辺がいくつか見られます。最上部の浜辺は“苧浦”で、今日の苧洞港だと思われます。下にある浜辺は“道方廳”で、今日の道洞だと思われます。

この地図では2つの岩だけが海中に描かれています。一つは“鎗巖”で、もう一つは“将軍巖”です。〈もう一つ、冑巖がある*訳者注)“鎗巖”はその形から、槍(やり)岩という意味だと思われます。“鎗巖”がどの位置なのかよく分かりませんが、“将軍巖”は、現在の、蝋燭の台を意味する“燭台岩”だと思われます。ここで写真を見られます。〈リンク〉

島の中央の盆地も地図で確認出来ます。“羅里洞”もしくは“國洞”です。現在、羅里盆地と呼ばれています。

 地図5:南西部拡大図

上掲の地図は南西部です。いくつか入江もしくは浜辺が描かれています。下から“長斫之”“玄浦”“通邱尾“谷浦”“沙汰邱尾”“小黃土邱尾”です。“通邱尾”の名称は今日も使用されています。

岩が二つ描かれています。“華巖”と“鳳巖”です。“華巖”は花の岩で、“鳳巖”は、不死鳥の岩を意味していると思います。“華巖”はおそらく現在の“亀岩”で〈リンク〉、“鳳巖”は“獅子岩”だと思われます〈リンク〉。李奎遠達の“亀岩”“獅子岩”の絵はよく描かれている思います。

最後に、“鳳巖”の前に三つの洞穴が描かれていることにお気づきでしょうか。そのうち二つが名前が付けられています。真ん中の洞穴ののみ、“可支窟”と名前が判読できました。意味は“アシカ洞”です。韓国語では가지굴です。1786年の鬱陵島視察では、検察吏に随行した小銃射手が、ある洞穴の前で2頭のアシカを射殺した、とありました。

独島/竹島論争のなかで、韓国側の歴史学者は“可支島〈アシカ島)”と言う名前の島が“独島”だと主張しますが、日本側の学者は“可支島”は単なる鬱陵島の付属等にすぎないと言いいます。私は、“可支島”は、アシカ洞の近くにある“鳳巖”のことを指していると考えています。その理由は、アシカ洞の近くにある、と言うだけでなく、今日その岩が“獅子岩”と呼ばれているからでもあります韓国語ではアシカは“bada saja”といい、それは文字通り海のライオンを意味します。鬱陵島のアシカ、つまり海のライオンが全てあの周辺の洞窟に生息していたため、韓国人は過去のある時点で、“鳳岩”を“獅子岩”に変えたのではないでしょうか。

最後に、皆さんがよく注意して見ていたかどうか、質問があります。地図に名前が載っていた全ての島、小島、そして岩のうち、どれが“独島”を指していたと思いますか?

降参ですか?そうですね、ソウル大学のKyujang Gak 研究所の人々は“象岩”だと考えています。しかし彼らは、なぜ鬱陵島の北にあるのか説明できません。以下は、ウェブサイトに載っている、1882年の鬱陵島の地図に関する研究所の見解です。〈余りに疲れて全部を訳せませんが、赤で表示した一部のみ訳します〉

“鬱陵島の古い地図では、皆“独島”に特に興味を持ちます。(上掲の)この地図では、虹霓巖が“独島”に似ているようで、注目されます。北に描かれているのは、おかしいのですが。”

この引用はここで見ることが出来ます〈リンク〉。

韓国の歴史学者が地図上のどんな岩や島をみても、“独島”をそこに見出してしまうことが、私にはとても不思議です。脳みそが半分でもある人が、問題になっている虹霓巖と言う岩を見て“独島”に似ていると言うなんて、まったく理解できません。つまるところこの岩は、鬱陵島の北の沖の、象岩がある所のすぐ近くに描かれているのです。それだけでなく、地図に描かれた絵は象岩にそっくりなのです。もしソウル大学の人々が地図を見てこんなことも分からないのに〈簡単な計算も出来ないようなのに〉、一般の韓国市民は、一体どうすればよいのでしょう。

ところで、私がどうやって地図上の場所の名前が分かったか、不思議に思いますか?実は、李奎遠の鬱陵島検察記を参照しながら書いたのです。また、上記の研究所の引用も、地名が沢山載っていたので参考にしました。しかし、大変不思議なことに、その筆者は“アシカ洞”について何も言及していません。幸いなことに、私はこの地図が載っている本と虫眼鏡を持っていて、判読できたのです。

ソウル大学は多くの地図をオンラインで公開しており、じっくりと閲覧できるようになっています。しかし、奇妙なことに、この1882年の地図はその中にはいっていません。彼らの蔵書に違いないのに。なぜこのような重要な地図がウェブサイトで閲覧できるようになっていないのでしょうか?私は、洞穴の一つが“可支窟〈アシカ洞〉”と名前が記載されているのを、見られたくないのではないか、と思うのです。どなたかウェブサイトで“可支窟”について触れているのを見たことがありますか?独島/竹島論争で重要な証拠になると思いませんか?

Links to More Posts on Takeshima/Dokdo (With Japanese translations)

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 12


58 Responses to “Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Maps 2”


  1. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 […]


  2. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 […]


  3. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 […]


  4. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 […]


  5. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 […]


  6. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 […]


  7. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 […]


  8. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 […]