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Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Maps 7

January 20th, 2007 . by Gerry-Bevers

The following map is called the Ulleungdo-Doheyong (鬱陵島圖形 – 울릉도도형). The date of the map is not completely certain, but it seems to have been made in 1711, after a survey expedition of Ulleungdo by Samcheok commander Park Chang-seok (朴昌錫). This may have been the first of several similar maps that would follow.

 
Map 1: Ulleungdo-Dohyeong (鬱陵島圖形) ca. 1711

All of the rocks and islets offshore are labeled as “Rocky Peaks” (石峯 – 석봉), except for Elephant Rock, which is labeled as “Hole Rock” (穴岩 – 혈암).


Map 2: Ulleungdo-Dohyeong (鬱陵島圖形) Northeast Section

Only one island on the map is named.


Map 3: Ulleungdo-Dohyeong (鬱陵島圖形) Southeast Section

The island is off the east shore and is labeled as 所謂 于山島 – 海長竹田 (소위 우산도  – 해장죽전), which means “the so-called Usando – fields of haejangjuk.”


Map 4: Ulleungdo-Dohyeong (鬱陵島圖形) East Shore

Haejangjuk (海藏竹) is a type of bamboo that can grow 20 feet tall and has a diameter of 1.5 inches. Its scientific classification is Pleioblastus simonii.


Map 5: Ulleungdo-Dohyeong (鬱陵島圖形) Usando

The bamboo fields on Usando are the only ones on the map where the type of bamboo is actually named.

The Gyujanggak Map & Document Museum at Seoul National says that the Usando on the map seems to be “Dokdo” (여기 于山島라 기입한 섬이 바로 獨島를 지칭하는 듯하다). However, because the island is located off the east coast of Ullleungdo in almost the exact location as Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo, and because the island had fields of bamboo that could grow twenty feet high, I think Seoul National University is full of crap mistaken.

Dokdo (Liancourt Rocks) is essentially just two barren rocks that did not have the soil to grow the kind of bamboo mentioned above. The Usando shown on the above map was almost certainly Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo (竹島 – 죽도), which is approximately 2.2 kilometers off the northeast shore of Ulleungdo. By the way, Jukdo means “Bamboo Island” in English.

Japanese Translation Provided by Kaneganese

(Gerryの投稿の日本語訳です。)

以下の地図は鬱陵島圖形と呼ばれるものです。発行年は不明ですが、地図に押されている押印(備邊司印)から1884年頃のものと考えられています。

 地図1:鬱陵島圖形 (1884頃)

沖にある岩や小島は全て“石峯”と名づけられていますが、象岩のみ“穴岩”と標記されています。

 地図2:北東部拡大図

一つの島だけ名前がついています。

 地図3:南東部拡大図

その島は東の沖にあり、所謂 于山島 – 海長竹田〈いわゆる于山島ー海長竹の竹林)と標記されています。

 地図4:東部沖拡大図

海藏竹(日本名は女竹?)は、高さが20フィート〈約6m9.6cm〉、幅が1.5インチ(約3.8cm)にもなる竹の種類です。学名はPleioblastus simoniiです。

 地図5:于山島拡大図

于山島の竹林は、地図上で唯一竹の種類が記載された場所です。

ソウル大学奎章閣地図文献博物館は、地図の描かれた于山島が“独島”であろう (여기 于山島라 기입한 섬이 바로 獨島를 지칭하는 듯하다)、と述べています。しかし、この地図の于山島は、鬱陵島の隣にある竹嶼と、鬱陵島の東海岸沖のほぼ全く同じ場所に位置しています。それに、この島は6mも伸びる竹林があると書かれていることも合わせて、ソウル大学は、大嘘つき、いえ、お間違えになっている、と思います。

独島(Liancourt Rocks)は、そもそも不毛な2つの岩からなる島で、上記のような竹が生える土さえありません。地図に表された于山島はほぼ確実に、鬱陵島の北東沖約2.2kmというすぐ隣にある竹嶼です。ちなみに、竹嶼は、竹島のことです。

Links to More Posts on Takeshima/Dokdo (With Japanese translations)

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 12


76 Responses to “Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Maps 7”

  1. comment number 1 by: Aki

    Gerry,

    As opp mentioned, the year of “辛卯” comes every 60 years.
    “辛卯” is a name of “干支” (eto in Japanese). The table in the following page shows how to know 干支 (eto) of a given year.

    Tabele for calculating 干支 (eto)

    To know 干支 (eto) of a given year, divide the year by 60 and find the remainder from the above table. The Chinese character written in the same panel as the remainder is the 干支 (eto) of the year.

    For example, dividing 2007 by 60 gives 33 with remainder of 27. By finding 27 in the above table, you can know that this year (2007) is “丁亥” year. In the same way, dividing 1711 by 60 gives 28 with remainder of 31. The table above shows that the year with the remainder of 31 is 辛卯. However, 1771, 1831, 1891, and so on, are also 辛卯 years since year of 辛卯 comes every 60 years.

  2. comment number 2 by: Gerry-Bevers

    Hi Oop & Aki,

    Yes, I know about the 60-year cycle, but I came up with the 1711 year based on the following comment on Seoul National University’s Gyuganggak’s site:

    지승(地乘)〈奎 15423〉 에서 : …의식을 반영한다. 1711년 박석창이 수토후 제작한 「울릉도도형」(규장각 소장)에는 中峰이…

    It says, Ulleungdo-Dohyeong was made after Pak Seok-chang’s (should be Pak Chang-seok) 1711 inspectioin. The link leads to a blank page, so I am not sure if the comment is considered accurate or not, especially since Empas has this to say about the map:

    이 지도와 동시에 그렸다고 추정되는 〈울릉도도형 鬱陵島圖形〉 뒷면에 영장(營將) 박창석(朴昌錫) 소작이라고 밝혀 있고, 지도에 비변사인(備邊司印)이 있는 것으로 보아, 1884년(고종 21) 울릉도 개척령이 공포된 전후에 제작된 것으로 생각된다. link

    The above quote says that the map seems to have been made sometime about 1884 because the stamp on the map refers to Bibyeonsa; however, 1884 was not a 辛卯 year.

    Anyway, there are, at least, two dates for the map on the Internet: 1711 and 1884. I am not sure which date is correct, but the shape of Usando on the map looks similar to the shape of the island on other maps in the 1700s and early 1800s. Also, 1711 matches the 辛卯 year reference, which makes me think it might be 1711. To be sure I think more research is necessary.


  3. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7 […]

  4. comment number 4 by: yunjune

    I think you have strangely prejudice on Korea. Probably there would be a few of mistakes korean made. But the most of parst korean claim for the dokdo and colonial periods are based on the facts, not forgery. I would show you one thing from japanese site(http://www1.ocn.ne.jp/~sinryaku/abasiziwoutu.htm ) which demonstrates dokdo is belonged to korea. Moreover, it also shows japan’s aggression into Korea very sharply with a bunch of photos. Please. Don’t deceive yourself and netizen watching your site.

  5. comment number 5 by: ponta

    yunjune
    Japan is a democratic country. There are pros and cons about everything. I am glad of it. Saying there is a Japanese site in which Japanese people claim Dokdo belongs to Korea does not prove it belongs to Korea. Besides, looking at the site, their argument has been refuted on this blog.

    BTW I am glad they are safe and their occupation are protected in Japan: Gerry, who disagree with Korean nationalist assumptions was rejected renewing the contract just because he wrote on the two rocks on the Internet.
    The past atrocity is important, but the pressing issue is how to deal with the present atrocity to the freedom of speech in some nations. I wonder why the site you cited
    does not complain of that.

  6. comment number 6 by: pacifist

    yunjune,

    Welcome to our discussion.
    We will be willing to hear your opinion why you believe that Korean claims are based on facts.

    Could you please tell us the “facts”, especially the facts you believed that Dokdo is Korean territory?

    We have proved that Usando in the old Korean books were not Takeshima/Dokdo and Usando in the Korean maps were not Takeshima/Dokdo.
    The Great Korean Empire (1897-1910) excluded Takeshima/Dokdo from their territory as seen in the book “The Great Korea Geographic Book” (1899).

    Therefore it is natural to think that Korea didn’t know the island or she thought that it was Japanese territory.

    If you have some evidence to refute the above, please let us know. Thank you.

  7. comment number 7 by: pacifist

    yunjune,

    You repeatedly wrote in another thread that You believe that there are some “facts” for Korea to own Takeshima/Dokdo.

    But still you have not shown the “facts” here. Are you lying that you have some “facts”? Why don’t you show the “facts” here?

    yunjune, I’m waiting for your reply.


  8. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7 […]


  9. […] Here are links to my posts explaining the two maps shown with the article: First Map […]

  10. comment number 10 by: WDSCz

    Gerry Bevers Wrote: In fact, Usando was mentioned as Ulleungdo’s neighboring island before Jukdo was, which suggests to me that the Japanese may have introduced the name, “Jukdo,” to Koreans.

    I say…

    죽도고 ・ 도설( 竹島考・圖說 )의 죽도・송도 지도(竹島・松島之圖)와 신각 일본여지노정전도(新刻 日本輿地路程全圖, 1791년), 그밖의 일본의 고대문헌을 보면 알 수 있듯, 일본은 분명히 울릉도를 죽도(竹島)로, 독도를 송도(松島)로 인식하고 있었다.

    일본은 과거에 독도를 ‘마츠시마(松島)’로, 울릉도를 ‘다케시마(竹島)’로 불렀으나 서양 지도와 해도에서 다케시마(竹島)가 존재하지 않는 섬 ‘아르고노트(Argonaute)’에 맞춰졌다가 아르고노트가 사라지면서 일본지도에서는 다케시마도 함께 사라졌고, 대신 마츠시마(松島)가 울릉도를 가리키는 다줄레(Dagelet) 섬에 대응해 사용됐다. 과거 일본 고지도에서 독도를 가리키던 마츠시마(松島)라는 명칭이 울릉도로 옮아간 결과가 된 것이다. 그리하여 독도에 대해서는 어떤 동양 명칭도 사용되지 않게 됐다.

    그 후, 일본은 시마네현 고시로 독도를 무주지로 억지 상정하여 그들의 영토에 편입하게 되면서, 독도의 명칭을 죽도(竹島)로 공식화 하였다. 옛지명에서의 竹島와 松島의 이름이 완전히 서로 뒤바뀌어 버리는 어처구니 없는 일이 벌어진 것이다.

    Only for Gerry Bevers who even understand the Old Style Hanmun(漢文古語), believe or not… PPP.

  11. comment number 11 by: ponta

    WDSCz
    Sorry you have completely missed Gerry’s point.
    there.Probably Gerry will explain it.

    … PPP.

    Are you a Korean thug?
    A lot of Japanese is beggining to be concerned about Gerry’s safty.


  12. […] On the map in question, which you can see here, Usando and the large rocky islets clearly visible off the north shore are labeled. Usando is, of course, labeled as “Usando,” and the rocky islets off the north shore of Ulleungdo are simply labeled as “stone peaks” (石峯), which suggests that that those rocks were clearly sticking out of the water. That is why I think the unamed “islands” to the south of Ulleungdo were just rock formations near the surface of the water, which may have been mapped because they could have been a danger to ships. A study of the waters off the southern shore of Ulleungdo would probably reveal the truth. Therefore, I think the suggestion that the map was not made from an actual survey is a groundless supposition, especially since Usando and the islets off the northern shore are drawn quite accurately. […]


  13. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7 […]


  14. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7 […]


  15. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7 […]


  16. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7 […]


  17. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7 […]


  18. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7 […]


  19. […] The following 1711 Korean map shows a small island just off the east coast of Ulleungdo in a location that is very close to where Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo is today (See more of the map here.) On the island is written the following: 所謂 于山島 – 海長竹田 (소위 우산도  – 해장죽전) […]


  20. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7 […]


  21. […] Korean maps tell us that Usando was Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo, which is located about 2.2 kilometers off Ulleungdo’s northeast shore. (See maps here, here, here, and here.) In 1903, two kilometers was equal to five Korean ri, so it seems very likely that the island that was supposedly 40 to 50 ri northeast of Ulleungdo was actually 4 to 5 ri northeast of Ulleungdo. Usando was simply an old name for Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo, and was a name no longer used by Ulleungdo residents in 1903 and 1913. […]


  22. […] Korean maps tell us that Usando was Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo, which is located about 2.2 kilometers off Ulleungdo’s northeast shore. (See maps here, here, here, and here.) In 1903, two kilometers was equal to five Korean ri, so it seems very likely that the island that was supposedly 40 to 50 ri northeast of Ulleungdo was actually 4 to 5 ri northeast of Ulleungdo. Usando was simply an old name for Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo, and was a name that Ulleungdo residents in 1903 and 1913 apparently no longer used to refer to the island. […]


  23. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7 […]


  24. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7 […]


  25. […] The Jukdo mentioned in the 1900 edict was present-day Jukdo, which is located 2.2 kilometers off Ulleungdo’s east shore. Old Korean maps of Ulleungdo, however, show very clearly that the old name for Jukdo was “Usando.” (See maps here, here, here, and here.) That means that the “Ulleungdo” and “Usando” mentioned as being Uldo County in the 1908 document was present-day Ulleungdo and its neighboring island of Jukdo. If that is true, then what happened to the “Seokdo” in the 1900 edict? […]


  26. […] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7 […]