Occidentalism
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Now for something else…

September 4th, 2006 . by Matt

morning musume
Now you do not have to wonder what they have been saying

A friend that lives in Japan sent me a site that has more than any grown man has a right to know about Japanese child/teen/adult singing group Morning Musume. This site has interviews, translations into English, everything Morning Musume on video. By all means, check it out if you are a fan.

I first came across Morning Musume when I was about 22 years old in Japan. The first song I heard of theirs, and pretty much the only one that I liked, was ‘Love Machine‘. Here is the Youtube of the song below. You will need to fast forward a couple of minutes before the song starts.

The lyrics of the song showed me how radically different the lyrics could be in Japan from in the west. Lyrics like “in the bright future, it is my desire to be employed“. I cant say I have ever heard something like that anywhere else.

Enjoy the site.


5 Responses to “Now for something else…”

  1. comment number 1 by: Rose

    I cant say I have ever heard something like that anywhere else.

    I don’t know too much about it but as far as I know, the style of their lyrics was not common and normal before it became popular.
    I’m not sure if fans liked it partly because of the style of their lyrics though.

  2. comment number 2 by: blue_cat

    I wonder where you get that translation “in the bright future, it is my desire to be employed“. Your translation machine may be old type, and not working correctly.

    In the bright future, it is my desire to be employed —– [Wrong]  
    I want to get married (to my dream guy) who brings me a bright future. — [Correct]

    As you see the music video, the girl is wearing a wedding dress on that phrase.
    “Syuusyoku (to be employed)” means getting a job, but it also means getting marriage in girls slang.

    I think it is a simple dream that every girl in this world has.

  3. comment number 3 by: Matt

    I wonder where you get that translation “in the bright future, it is my desire to be employed“. Your translation machine may be old type, and not working correctly.

    オンライン翻訳なんか使っていないよ。「明るい未来に就職希望だわ」の就職は「結婚」だというのは始めて聞いた。本当なのかな?

  4. comment number 4 by: Rose

    I have been away from Japan for a little too long to tell whether that is correct but, if it says 「明るい未来に就職希望だわ」 in the lyrics, it sounds to me that it can be translated to something like “I wish to be employed to the bright future” meaning “I want to be happy forever”.

    I cannot confirm what blue_cat said but 「永久就職」 means 「結婚」 so I would not be surprised if that is true. This one is, by the way, I think rather old expression though.

  5. comment number 5 by: hige

    blue_cat has called it right.
    As Rose said, it’s very common in Japan for women to refer
    to marriage as “permanent employment”(永久就職)

    Since the song has been clever about not being too direct,
    something like “I wanna hitch myself to a bright future”
    would be the appropriate translation here.

    Kind of funny though how most J-girl pop songs proclaim
    “you can achieve your dreams!”
    “believe in yourself!”
    And in the end, it’s all about finding the right man…