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"South Korean minister says its too early to lift restrictions on Japanese culture"

September 14th, 2006 . by Gerry-Bevers

The International Herald Tribute reports here that South Korea’s Minister of Culture and Tourism says that “it is too early to open the South Korean entertainment market fully to Japanese culture.” Korea has opened her market to Japanese films and computer games, but still bans Japanese animation and TV shows.

Here is a quote from the article:

“Some Koreans would feel some hostility and reluctance,” he told foreign correspondents in Seoul. “We are currently waiting for more open public sentiment and consensus.”

In Texas, we have a word to describe Korea’s explanation for not fully opening her market to Japanese entertainment products. It is called “bullshit.”

If Koreans are “reluctant” to watch Japanese entertainment products, then they could choose not to, but that is not a good reason for not, at least, giving them the choice. If “hostility” is the reason for banning Japanese animation and TV programs, then why aren’t Koreans hostile to Japanese movies and computer games? If Koreans are hostile to Japan, why would they distinguish between movies and computer games and animation and TV programs?

Let’s be honest here. The real reason that Japanese animation and TV programs are banned in Korea is that Korea fears the competition. Japanese animation is very popular in Korea, as can be seen by all the links and references to it on Korean Web sites. I think many of Japan’s TV programs would also be popular since many offer the same kind of silly entertainment that is popular on Korean TV. In fact, Koreans may even come to suspect that many Korean programs are copied from Japanese programs.

I think that Korean officials also fear that too much exposure to Japanese culture would remove much of the hostility that Koreans have toward Japan. In other words, I think Korean officials want to feed and continue the hostility and fear that exposure to too much Japanese culture would show that the Japanese are a peace-loving people rather than the warmonging race of people that the Korean government and media try to paint them as. The Korean government may also fear that Koreans will realize that much of Korea’s culture is patterned on Japan’s.

The bottom line is that Korea needs to stop the charade and fully open her entertainment market to Japanese products. If Korea does that, maybe the hostility toward Japan will also stop or at least lessen.


44 Responses to “"South Korean minister says its too early to lift restrictions on Japanese culture"”

  1. comment number 1 by: ponta

    South Korean entertainment hasn’t faced any such issues in Japan, where it has made wide inroads there and across Asia as part of a phenomenon known as the “Korean Wave.” Japanese tourists regularly flock to sites where popular South Korean TV dramas are filmed and turn out by the hundreds to greet visiting South Korean stars.

    However, Kim also acknowledged Thursday concerns that South Korea’s current pop culture-oriented entertainment exports won’t be able to maintain their strong following.

    To prevent that, he said his ministry was taking steps to support international marketing. Seeking to broaden the appeal, the ministry also is hoping to infuse elements of traditional Korean culture into the country’s entertainment exports.

    This is understandable because Japan was so evil, and so we have good reason to hate Japan. Besides, Japan is trying to steal Dokdo, which belongs to us for 5000 years. And Yasukuni!! Can you believe that they worship Tojo, millions of Koreans were killed by him, and they worship him. Instead worship Kim Jong Il !!! man!! Japanese don’t like him because they are trying to prevent Korea from the unification, and that’s because they are afraid that the big unified great Korea will beat Japan.
    They are trying to invade us again. Japan has not changed a bit. Korea, by contrast, has been innocent, we have been a peace loving, free from massacre, free from assassination, free from prostitutes, free from silly TV programs, free from evil spirit.
    We let Japan learn from our great Korea culture, because we are so benevolent;anything Japanese that is world-famous is stolen from Korea. Never ever make evil Japanese culture infused in our pure beautiful Korean culture.
    The other day , I saw Japanese TV program on the net just like Korean TV program. Evil Japanese , they copied it from ours.
    I saw Japanese products that look exactly like ours. Damn, they copied them from ours. Truly evil.

    The ministry of culture is lenient, we should go back to good old days, we should ban everything Japanese. Sushi? oh no I hate it. Change the name anyway and put kimchi on it. Eat kimchi everyday, and you’ll be fine.
    You get it?

  2. comment number 2 by: YoungRocco

    Gerry-Bevers:

    You contradict yourself:

    Japanese animation is very popular in Korea, as can be seen by all the links and references to it on Korean Web sites.

    You yourself have already made the point that Japanese animation is already popular here. Yet further down you claim:

    I think that Korean officials also fear that too much exposure to Japanese culture would remove much of the hostility that Koreans have toward Japan. In other words, I think Korean officials want to feed and continue the hostility and fear that exposure to too much Japanese culture would show that the Japanese are a peace-loving people rather than the warmonging race of people that the Korean government and media try to paint them as.

    If Japanese animation is already popular here wouldn’t that mean that the alleged fear and hostility is already ebbing?

    It could also mean that the ministry doesn’t enforce the law…

    As evidenced by the fact that I bought a Japanese anime video just last week from Lotte Mart.

    Japanese animation is already popular here, so what are you complaining about?

  3. comment number 3 by: James

    What a glorious day it will be, when the Koreans can enjoy shitty dramas with SMAP and KAT-TUN members in them while the Japanese continue to enjoy shitty dramas with Yon-sama in them. Maybe mutual bad taste can spawn friendship between two peoples.

  4. comment number 4 by: James

    YoungRocco:

    Does Japanese animation air on Korean TV, or is it only available in stores?

  5. comment number 5 by: Gerry-Bevers

    YoungRocco,

    I did not contradict myself. Young Koreans illegally downloading Japanese animation is different from exposing the general population to Japanese culture through TV programs and other forms of entertainment.

    Koreans illegally downloading Japanese animation shows that they are not “reluctant” to view Japanese entertainment, which contradicts what the minister said. If Koreans of all ages are allowed to watch Japanese programs, that will give them the opportunity to see for themselves how the Japanese think and live. That will allow them to form their own opinions about the Japanese, instead of having to depend on the Korean government and media to do it for them.

    By the way, Koreans ARE getting a free ride in terms of the national defense, and they now know it. At first Koreans were all pretty much all gung ho about regaining control of their military in wartime, but after they heard that it was going to cost them much more in taxes, wartime control suddenly wasn’t as important as it used to be. It seems that once a person gets used to riding for free, it is hard for them to give it up.

  6. comment number 6 by: tomato

    James>

    Well, this is about censorship. You know what kind of message a censorship by a government gives to its people. You know how it obstucts free speech and ideas…censorship is for authoritarian governments, not for true democracies (unless if it is meant to repel hate…like the anti-antisemitisim laws in France and anti-Nazi laws in Germany.).

    Governments engaging in censorship want to control the thoughts of their people…this is surely against basic human rights. That’s why it is CONSTITUTIONALLY forbidden in the USA and Japan. This continuation of censorship lets you know the true nature of the S Korean regime. Is it really a democracy? I don’t believe it one bit. Their using censorship to fuel hate, not to repel it, that’s for sure.

    ponta>
    Where did you find the comments? It’s really disgusting how some (many?) Koreans are brainwashed. It’s just like neo-Nazis hating the Jews for their “conspiravy to overtake the world”- true nonsense. And these are not neo-Nazis but seemingly regular Koreans citizens! The matter is getting more and more like issue of national security for Japan here. If you have enough paraoid thugs hating you as your neighbor, you should be aware.

  7. comment number 7 by: tomato

    At first Koreans were all pretty much all gung ho about regaining control of their military in wartime, but after they heard that it was going to cost them much more in taxes, wartime control suddenly wasn’t as important as it used to be.

    Really? That seems so typical…for them, national pride is everything, and once that is an issue, all rational thinking stops. Kind of scary when you think about it…

  8. comment number 8 by: pacifist

    I’ve heard that TV animations were aired after cutting scenes that seemed Japanese, so they have already seen some of Japanese animations without knowing that those were Japanese.

    I know that “Mazinger Z” was popular in Korea (as seen in Korean TV dramas), although they may have thought that it was Korean original.

    As to Movie animations, “Hotaru No Haka” (which means “Grave of a firefly”) was banned because it depicted Japanese victims (children) of the WWII. Korean government may have thought that there shouldn’t be Japanese victims and only Koreans were victims.

  9. comment number 9 by: pacifist

    addendum:
    The animation was titled as “Grave of the Fireflies”:
    http://www.amazon.com/Grave-Fireflies-Collector-Isao-Takahata/dp/B00006HAWP/ref=pd_sxp_grid_pt_2_0/102-4918675-2431358?ie=UTF8

  10. comment number 10 by: YoungRocco

    Gerry Bevers:

    These two quotes of yours had me laughing for awhile:

    If Koreans of all ages are allowed to watch Japanese programs, that will give them the opportunity to see for themselves how the Japanese think and live

    I think Korean officials want to feed and continue the hostility and fear that exposure to too much Japanese culture would show that the Japanese are a peace-loving people rather than the warmonging race of people that the Korean government and media try to paint them as.

    How do shows like DragonBall Z, Gundam Wing, Inuyasha or Evangelion show a “peace-loving” culture?

    And I certainly hope 変態 doesn’t show how people live…

    Oh, by the way, the DragonBall series comes on regularly on my television.

  11. comment number 11 by: James

    Pacifist: Do you mean Taekwon V? It is a popular Korean anime robot that looks like Mazinger Z. Don’t let the fact that Taekwon V was created after Mazinger Z fool you: Taekwon V is a totally original Korean creation. Look, he even defends Dokdo from the evil Japanese:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FZfgUDm7qRk

  12. comment number 12 by: Gerry-Bevers

    Here is another example that proves that Koreans are not as “reluctant” to embrace Japanese entertainment as the minister would have people believe.

    “Japanese Manga Rule Among Korean Salarymen”

  13. comment number 13 by: YoungRocco

    Tomato:

    You’re way out of line with this statement:

    That’s why it is CONSTITUTIONALLY forbidden in the USA and Japan

    False. censorship is not even mentioned in the Constitution of the United States.

    Almost every state engages in censorship. This is a basic fact of governments.

  14. comment number 14 by: James

    YoungRocco:

    The first ammendment:

    Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

    Of course, one can argue that there is censorship: for example, the government occasionally fines television networks for things that are judged “obscene”, and other things such as child pornography. If a law was passed banning the broadcast or sale of something as harmless as Japanese dramas in America, there’s a good chance the law would be declared unconstitutional and void.

  15. comment number 15 by: Travolta

    Grave of Fireflies is a masterpeice of animation and is one of the best anti-war movies I have ever seen. Every school child should be forced to watch it. It should be studied all across the world in schools. It really is an excellent peice of art.

    It is also the sort of thing im quite sure would really pull some tears in Korea. Koreans are very emotional from what I have seen living there. Korean women easily cry while watching sad movies. I’m sure something like Grave of Fireflies could really help to bridge relations between Korea and Japan. Of course Japan was the agressor in the war, Japanese people know this, the director of the film knows this and he is trying to show the result of that war. That innocent people suffer. It is clearly an anti-war film and for that reason everyone should watch it.

    I guess there are economic reasons for the ban as well. Many koreans seem to want to protect their film industry and went ape shit when the quota was changed (im sure most of you here know that already ^^). In any case banning Japanese animation from Korean TV seems totally unwarranted. It is racist in the extreme. It should be up to the broadcasters whether they want to air anime or not and not the government. This is blatant cultural censorship carried out for political reasons and its shameful.

    Tsk tsk tsk. Grow up Korea. Isn’t it about time?

  16. comment number 16 by: ponta

    YoungRocco

    Almost every state engages in censorship. This is a basic fact of governments.

    Well James answered it already.

    In case of Japan, the censorship is forbidden explicitly..

    Article 21:
    1)
    Freedom of assembly and association as well as speech, press and all other forms of expression are guaranteed.
    2)
    No censorship shall be maintained, nor shall the secrecy of any means of communication be violated.

    In principle, the freedom of expression is guaranteed.
    Exceptions are strictly restricted and the burden of the proof is on the government.
    Very roughly, you can only restrict the expression by place and time only if overriding reasons exists.
    You can forbid the content of the expression being expressed if and only if the present and clear danger exist.(this is a bit old formula, but it can do well for the discussion) .

    This is so basic to the governments which adopt the rule of law.

    Almost every state engages in censorship. This is a basic fact of governments.

    Propaganda in North Korea?

    These days, we would think that censorship is an efficient mechanism for totalitarian regimes to attain their goal of controlling the minds of the population. We think of cases like Hitler’s Germany or the Soviet Union during the Cold War. Totalitarian philosophy is to control the thoughts of the subjects of the state, so it can control their way of life, their habits, what they read, what they talk about, in such a way that dissidence will be made impossible. The subjects of the state live enclosed in a fictitious reality, or at least a partial one.Types of governments and censorship

    James
    BTW

    mutual bad taste can spawn friendship between two peoples.

    It is a good idea!!!!

    Tomato

    Where did you find the comments? It’s really disgusting how some (many?) Koreans are brainwashed.

    Oh, it is me!! Damn, I am brainwashed without realizing it……finally Oh my, what should I do?. I went against Nietze’s warning.

    Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster

    (was just kidding (^_-))

  17. comment number 17 by: Matt

    False.

    YoungRocco, if your argument stems from your own personal opinion, it hardly makes sense to label something ‘false’. I guess you can keep doing that, but eventually people will jump on you for it.

    censorship is not even mentioned in the Constitution of the United States.

    Almost every state engages in censorship. This is a basic fact of governments.

    I dont even know if the word ‘censorship’ even existed at the time of the writing of the American constitution, but anyway, if you are going to make those kinds of statements, then you might as well give us some concrete examples of censorship in the US being similar to that of Korea. Wikipedia gives examples of censorship in the US, and it is nothing like Korea.

  18. comment number 18 by: YoungRocco

    Matt:

    Thanks for your post.

    Now to address your concerns…

    Tomato’s Quote:

    That’s why it is CONSTITUTIONALLY forbidden in the USA and Japan

    YoungRocco:

    False. censorship is not even mentioned in the Constitution of the United States.

    This isn’t an opinion. This is fact. Censorship is not mentioned in the constitution and the U.S. government engages in censorship frequently.

    then you might as well give us some concrete examples of censorship in the US being similar to that of Korea.

    I wasn’t aware that we were engaging in a debate on comparative censorship. My remark towards Tomato was intended to make it very clear to him that he was advancing a false proposition. Censorship is a common feature of governments and very few(if any) countries have completely free speech.

    One can make the assertion that U.S. has a media that is more free than Korea, but this is not the argument that Tomato was making. He should have a made a more nuanced argument.

    Have a great evening.

  19. comment number 19 by: Matt

    YoungRocco, just so we are clear that censorship in the US and Korea (both of them) are two very different things. I think it was pretty clear what Tomato meant when he wrote that, and I dont think anyone misunderstood it either. Given the context of the argument, it is obvious that the kind of censorship Tomato was talking about was not the censorship of child pornography, or censorship of nuclear secrets.

    Lose the attitude, ok, please? Thanks.

  20. comment number 20 by: James

    YoungRocco:

    The fact is, censorship in the USA is so limited that most people don’t even consider what exists censorship. It’s a far cry from something like the ban on Japanese entertainment, which is clearly different from restrictions on pornography and bomb-making information.

  21. comment number 21 by: pacifist

    Dear Travolta,

    Thanks for your comment on the anime movie “Grave of Fireflies”. I agree with you. This kind of touching animation may have a good effect on friendship between two countries.

    If you don’t know this anime movie, please take a look at opinions of viewers at the site I wrote above. I was surprised to read many Americans were moved to see this movie, a story of the children in the country of the then enemy. Good movies effect on everybody, maybe on people of Korea too.

    After the WWII, we Japanese grew up seeing American TV dramas, such as Lassie, Lawhide, Leave It To Beaver, Superman etc…and became to have familiar feelings and feeling of admiration. They surely had a good effect on Japanese boys and girls.

  22. comment number 22 by: ponta

    Wow I have nothing to say,…………….
    except
    Lucie’s show/ Combat(Vic Morrow!!!!) / Popeye (Olive!)/Batman(Robin!),”Bewitched”
    Witch or Wife(Darrin!)…… /Flipper/Star trek.( I was glad Mr. Sulu was the member)……….(a bit old?) …………
    THE INCREDIBLE HULK/Columbo./Kojak/……..

    Wow, Japanese are culturally invaded? …….Nahhh

    Welcome back, Pacifist.

  23. comment number 23 by: pacifist

    Thank you ponta for supplimentation of American drama titles. There were really lots of good dramas. They helped us to understand ordinary American life and made us fond of America.

    James,
    It’s not Taekwon V, I mean Mazinger Z. I’ve heard many Korean actors related to this name in the TV dramas maybe from 1990’s, especially when they talked to children. So I guessed that it may have aired in Korea.

  24. comment number 24 by: Gerry-Bevers

    Did you guys get “Gunsmoke” and “Bonanza” in Japan? How about “Gilligan’s Island,” “The Beverly Hillbillies,” “Lost in Space,” and the “Outer Limits,” which were four of my favorites?

    By the way, when I mentioned “silly entertainment” in Japan and Korea, I was trying to make a point about the similarity in entertainment, not criticize it. Afterall, the US has also had its fair share of silly entertainment. For example, hopefully you guys did not get “Hee Haw” in Japan.

    Finally, I want to say “thank you” to Japan. I grew up on “Godzilla” movies.

  25. comment number 25 by: pacifist

    Of course, I know Bonanza, Lost In Space (it had a Japanese title “Space family Robinsin” and I liked the elder sister of the boy) , Outer Limits (but I’m afraid that was later version…in my boyhood, Twilight Zone – it’s Japanese title was Mystery Zone – was more popular).

    Maybe “Gunsmoke” may have had a Japanese title too but I don’t remember. I liked another western drama, it’s Japanese title was “Ranch of Lalamy” in which Robert Fuller acted as a good gunfighter.

  26. comment number 26 by: Gerry-Bevers

    I remember “Laramie,” but I did not really watch that for some reason. I watched “The Riflemen,” “Bat Masterson,” and “Rin Tin Tin,” Rawhide, and “Wagon Train”. I also liked “The Twilight Zone.”

    Now I am beginning to understand why I did not learn much in school. I was too busy watching TV.

  27. comment number 27 by: pacifist

    Gerry, me too!

    The Rifleman – Chuck Conners, wasn’t it?
    I liked both of the dog story “Rin Tin Tin” and “Lassie”. (In the latter drama, Jon Provost acted as a boy named Timmy)
    I remeber that there was another western drama “Annie, Take That Gun” (Idon’t know if it’s an original title or not).

    Also I liked “Ben Casey” and another medical drama in which Richard Chamberlain acted as a young resident doc (Japanese title was “Dr. Kildea”).

  28. comment number 28 by: pacifist

    One more drama that was very popular in Japan was “The Fugitive”.

  29. comment number 29 by: ponta

    “Laramie, Lawhide, and “Wagon Train”“The Twilight Zone”“Ben
    Casey slightly. I remember them slightly
    Little House on the Prairie was my moral inspiration.
    I love American silly TV.programs too.

    Come to think of it, I learned a lot from American TV programs, by which I came to understand there were variety of thought, variety of values, variety of Americans. American confidence,(The never ending battle for truth, justice, and the American way.!) , sadness, agony, joy, love…..justice, freedom, irony, stupidity, self criticism. After all they are the same human beings with these feelings and thoughts.
    . I guess that is the most important things to understand in cultural communication.
    And you can not hate Americans by watching “little house” every week.

  30. comment number 30 by: ponta

    Oh, and one reason many Koreans are stereotypical about Japan and Japanese ,i think , is unnecessary censorship by the government, which is characteristic of totalitarian regimes.

    It is sad that all Koreans have right and desire to knows about Japan is Yasukuni, comfort women and Hentai.

  31. comment number 31 by: wjk

    Gerry is wrong in saying that Koreans will embrace Japan more by accepting Japanese culture.

    This will not likely happen.

    Many aspects of Korean culture and history have been influenced by Japan since the mid 1800’s to the present times.

    During the occupation, the Japanese systematically tinkered with Korean history and culture.

    As a result, Koreans themselves are unsure of what is truly Korean, what really happenned in certain events in Korean history, etc.

    This sort of thing does not only affect those who who lived during Japanese rule, but pretty much every future Korean generation.

    Plus, it is East Asian culture to hold present generations responsible for the crimes of past generations. If you Westerners cannot accept that, you’re just being insensitive to East Asian culture, and you’re all venting for nothing, pretty much.

    I know Jewish people of European origin, who only buy Mercedes and BMW. So what? That doesn’t mean they’ll ever let the world forget what the Nazis did. In fact, the people I know of never cease to accuse Christians of what they did to Jewish people. One friend of mine even keeps a historical encyclopedia that documents what European kings did to Jewish people, to persecute them. You people of European origin are the ones who have always had more of a problem. Don’t accuse Koreans of going ape shit. We’re mild and way normal compared to you folk and what you’ve done to other races and other peoples. And stop accusing Koreans of being uniquely biased against Japan. China’s attitude confirms that it is not unique.

    Grow up is what you people need to do. What you guys do won’t ever affect foreign policy, social movements, or anything of that nature. That’s pretty much a fact.

    In the end, the most important fact is that South Korea in 2006 is much better than it was in 1945.

    The worship of the Kim family itself in North Korea is also very similar to how Koreans were dictated to worship the Japanese Emperor, and that was another legacy of Japanese occupation.

    I saw the Grave of the Fireflies, which was a two thumbs up movie, rated by Roger Ebert. My brother cried. I saw it. I thought it was sad, but I didn’t cry. Because I knew that Koreans had it worse, and definitely not better.

  32. comment number 32 by: wjk

    as an analogy, do you think Mexico has nothing to say about the US, given that they enjoy US culture?

    Why don’t you hack them as well, for hanging onto lost territory in California, Arizona, Texas, etc, which “apparently” shouldn’t affect their present generation.

    Dish some more crap to Native Americans as well. They “supposedly” shouldn’t have an excuse for blaming the white man for their status now, right?

    Folk on occidentalism are unique in that they try to label a natural human reaction into “ape shit”. Bravo to you.

  33. comment number 33 by: James

    Plus, it is East Asian culture to hold present generations responsible for the crimes of past generations. If you Westerners cannot accept that, you’re just being insensitive to East Asian culture, and you’re all venting for nothing, pretty much.

    Holding present generations responsible for things their ancestors did is not some unique cultural trait held by East Asians, it is a trait common to irrational and stupid people the world over. I’ve met plenty of East Asians who are able to think like rational adults about historical issues, including Koreans and Chinese who didn’t think of the Japanese as “children of war criminals” (as I’ve seen them referred to on various sites).

  34. comment number 34 by: ponta

    wjk
    First what is your opinion about the ministry of culture’s opinion?
    Do you think it is too early to lift the restriction?

    During the occupation, the Japanese systematically tinkered with Korean history and culture.

    As a result, Koreans themselves are unsure of what is truly Korean, what really happened in certain events in Korean history, etc.

    During occupation, and after occupation American culture influenced Japan greatly, they had banned various things during the occupation, they had spread the specific education, looking back, it was biased but I do not say American systematically tinkered with Japanese history and culture,
    There are a few ultra nationalist who claim American culture destroyed Japanese tradition, but I think they are wrong, on the contrary, it enriched Japanese culture.

    These
    are scenery of Korea from 1922 to 1938 depicted by Elizabeth Keith.

    I think your idea that “the Japanese systematically tinkered with Korean history and culture” is rather influenced by Korean ultra-nationalist.

    I don’t know what is “truly Japanese” and almost anything Japanese are influenced by Chinese culture, (and of course, Koreans helped to convey it) and American culture and I do not care whether they are “truly Japanese” or not.
    In Japan too, there are ultra-nationalist who make fuss about what they think is truly Japanese , but they are very minority, and I think they are wrong. Japanese tradition is the one where you preserve what has been important for Japan as it is now and welcome what will be valuable for Japan as it will be.

    it is East Asian culture to hold present generations responsible for the crimes of past generations.

    I have never heard of it.
    Yes, in case of Japan, the later generation who had nothing to do with the policy and control of the colonization apologized and compensated to Korea.

    But after all, Vietnamese let by gone be by gone. They do not blame Korea, massacre by Koreans in Vietnam for the sake of future.
    And Koreans young people do not blame themselves for the massacre and comfort women by Koreans after the colonization. Many young Korean do not even know it.

    Can I ask which country are you talking about?

    Gerry is wrong in saying that Koreans will embrace Japan more by accepting Japanese culture.

    Like it or not , Korean young people are embracing Japanese culture like Manga, Hentai pornography, etc. And Korean TV directors are coping the idea from Japanese TV programs already It is just that Korea people do not know where the idea come from. (as a side note, Japanese TV directors copied many idea from USA)
    Sure nobody know exactly what will happen in the future, but are there anything you fear when Japanese culture comes in ?

    .

  35. comment number 35 by: torren

    Geez a lot of posts over this issue. Anyway, whoever mentioned Grave of the Fireflies being praiseworthy is somewhat interesting; a lot of 50+ viewers who I spoke with generally thought it was lame, simply because they felt that times were actually much worse, but considering it as something aimed more for teenagers not many complaints were stoked.

    At any rate, I really don’t see why this is such a big problem (or I could just be getting this from the somewhat hostile air here). Japan has a much stronger animation industry and Korea doesn’t want their local groups (very large but lacking experience) to get crushed so they place these bans. It’s not really an issue of Koreans embracing the Japanese stuff, as that already has happened from last time I was there (and is also why I find it odd when people ask if I was ever assaulted for using Japanese in public). It worked for their movie industry and so I guess they think it’ll work for their animation industry. What’s wrong with that? At any rate, if it doesn’t work the ban will most likely fall from corporate deals. In fact, even though it is worse for Japanese animation profits, it probably is a good move seeing as how foreign animation teams from Japan and, previously the USA, have crushed many other local animation groups of different nations such as those in South America and parts of Europe.

    When one wants to protect their local talent from stronger groups, I usually don’t mind these tactics, esp. if it’s not issued by big corps. However…what I do mind is if they don’t actually enforce copying that does go on, so I hope that at the very least the Japanese government puts more effort into pressuring the S. Korean government into enforcing the theft of ideas.

    lol ponta…lay off the hentai bro ;), they don’t need any more tentacle rape stories over there, I think they already have big problems with those issues already.

  36. comment number 36 by: ponta

    Torren
    I can agree with your line of the thought to some extent, but the problem here is that the Korean ministry does not want to lift the ban for a different reason..

  37. comment number 37 by: tomato

    During the occupation, the Japanese systematically tinkered with Korean history and culture.

    As a result, Koreans themselves are unsure of what is truly Korean, what really happenned in certain events in Korean history, etc.

    ANOTHER FOREIGN BLAMING BY KOREANS!

    The reality is, before Korea was absorbed by Japan, Korea probably did not have much of a culture compared to Japan or China. Korea’s economy was really weak(I recall that the currency system was virtually non-existent during the Josen era (ponta, can you confirm this?))and didn’t have wealthy merchant entreprerneurs needed to promote any kind of art/culture. Nor did Korea have any high regard of artisans like the Japanese had. Compare the 19th century Japanese sword to the Korean sword – very, very different level of artisanship.

    It’s about time Korea realizes that your misery is not because of Japan. In fact, your “misery” is just in your minds…if you stop comparing with other countries in order to prove your superiority (which I guess you really can’t, that’s why you have to blame Japanese rule or even the US) and concentrate on improving what you have today, your misery will be over.

    Grow up is what you people need to do. What you guys do won’t ever affect foreign policy, social movements, or anything of that nature. That’s pretty much a fact.

    You mean S Koreans, right?

  38. comment number 38 by: wjk

    The reality is, before Korea was absorbed by Japan, Korea probably did not have much of a culture compared to Japan or China. Korea’s economy was really weak(I recall that the currency system was virtually non-existent during the Josen era (ponta, can you confirm this?))
    //Tomato, grow up, go back to your country. I’ve never heard of anyone saying that a country didn’t have much of a culture, because its economy was weak. You’re just bitterly hateful of Korea.


    Grow up is what you people need to do. What you guys do won’t ever affect foreign policy, social movements, or anything of that nature. That’s pretty much a fact.

    You mean S Koreans, right? ”
    //No, I mean your kind. This is an accurate statement. For example, Gerry Bevers can post all he wants here, but Dokdo is Dokdo, and there will never, ever be a war, a treaty, or an agreement that makes it Japanese. And that’s a fact.

  39. comment number 39 by: Gerry-Bevers

    Wjk,

    There may never be a war fought over “Dokdo” or a treaty made returning it to Japan, but, at least, the world will know that Korea has been lying about “Dokdo” and is illegally occupying Japanese territory. Korea’s integrity will be hurt, and people will begin to wonder how many other lies Korea has told about Japan.

  40. comment number 40 by: ponta

    (I recall that the currency system was virtually non-existent during the Josen era (ponta, can you confirm this?)

    Joseon dynasty had no important money. Back then, commerce was very weak in Korea. People self-supplied most things and commerce was discouraged by the government. Money was not in much use in Korea.

    The picture above is a Korean money created in 1633. I don’t see any reason for China to prohibit money for Koreans. They were not economic rivals at all and money was not an important thing in both of the confucian countries.

    (from nou‘s blog)

  41. comment number 41 by: GarlicBreath

    Go to any US college campus and the Japanese student union is full of Koreans. Go to any sushi restaurant and you will find a Kim making your sushi. Koreans worship Japanese culture and pretend to be Japanese whenever they can. Can you blame them? They no culture of their own before Japan legally annexed pitiful Korea. Most people were diseased and living in filthy squalor dying off before their 30’s.

  42. comment number 42 by: tomato

    wjk,

    Gerry is right. And Gerry and many others are not even Japanese.

    Tomato, grow up, go back to your country. I’ve never heard of anyone saying that a country didn’t have much of a culture, because its economy was weak. You’re just bitterly hateful of Korea.

    Koreans (which includes you) are the ones who are bitterly hateful of Japan. Stop blaming everything on Japan…you have no great arts or culture not becaue of Japan, but because your ancestors disregarded them and only copied the Chinese.

    I’m sick and tired of the baloney about Japan depriving Korean culture. Show me any law or policy of the Chosen Sotokufu (yes, the administrative body of Imperial Japan in Korea) that did that or you’re making just stupid allegations on Japan that the Koreans themselves are the real one to blame.

  43. comment number 43 by: tomato

    ponta>

    Thanks…

    The facts is, strong arts and culture needs people power. Of course, you can have kings promote arts, but in order to really have one that is influential and strong, it needs to spread to the people. For that, the people must be wealthy. Just look at the cultural centers of today…it is obvious if you’re poor, you don’t have much arts.

  44. comment number 44 by: dogbert

    but Dokdo is Dokdo, and there will never, ever be a war, a treaty, or an agreement that makes it Japanese. And that’s a fact.

    If that is so, then there is no reason at all for Korea to keep making a fuss about it.