Occidentalism
Duc, sequere, aut de via decede!

South Korea’s enabling of North Korea

October 24th, 2006 . by Matt

Propaganda
North Korean propaganda (courtesy of DPRK Studies)

The Washington Times has an editorial calling for the US to force South Korean companies propping up the North Korean regime to choose do business with North Korea, or the US. The editorial is also calling for an investment boycott of South Korean companies doing business with the enemies of the US.

The second — and possibly more tractable — impediment is posed by our nominal ally, South Korea. Seoul is guided by its left-wing, appeasement-minded president, Roh Moo Hyun, and the vested interests of roughly 10 publicly traded South Korean firms led by Hyundai that are determined to extend the misery Mr. Kim has inflicted on his people by simultaneously exploiting them for what amounts to slave labor, while enriching the North Korean despot. This is the effect of a variety of the North’s “Social Overhead Capital” (SOC) projects underwritten by the South.

The leading edge of these projects is an industrial park at Kaesong and a major tourist resort at Mount Kumgang. Editorializing on the odious nature of these ventures last Thursday, the Wall Street Journal observed:
“The Kaesong industrial park and Mount Kumgang resort are the centerpieces of the South’s misbegotten ‘Sunshine Policy’ of engagement with the North. They are also money machines for Kim Jong-il, contributing to the record $1 billion North-South trade last year. … Now that U.S.-led financial sanctions have reduced the North’s cash-flow from counterfeiting and drug-smuggling, money from the two sites is even more critical to the survival of Kim’s regime.”
The Journal noted the South Koreans responded to the unanimous U.N. Security Council resolution imposing additional sanctions on North Korea by immediately announcing the two sites would be exempt from their strictures.

The reason is not hard to fathom: According to a Web site maintained by one of Hyundai’s subsidiaries [http://www.hyundai-asan.com], South Korea expects to invest nearly $15 billion in these SOC projects in the North [including construction of new power utilities ($2.3 billion); developing telecommunications networks ($6 billion); the establishing and maintaining railroads ($4.7 billion); supplying water to Mount Kumgang ($770 million); and creating a new dam on the Imjin River ($660 million).] The hope is to grow the number of North Korean laborers slaving away for roughly $1.10 per day from 8,200 to 730,000 by 2012.

That is a huge sum of money invested in North Korean infrastructure. Surely this new infrastructure was either used for, or freed up the resources for, the North Korean nuclear program.

Astonishingly, even as Hyundai is working at cross-purposes with U.S. vital interests — including in Iran and Sudan, several of the company’s subsidiaries were as of 2005 suppliers to the Pentagon. Another Defense Department vendor is Samsung, which is also doing business with Kim Jong-il. The Defense Department’s reliance on such double-dealing vendors should be ended at once and the extent of the practice with respect to other companies that partner with terrorist-sponsoring regimes should be the subject of urgent congressional hearings.

Hear hear!

At the same time, American citizens should immediately review their portfolios, including their pension funds (both public ones such as the Federal Thrift Savings Plan and private ones like mutual funds). Hyundai, Samsung and others companies helping our enemies should be forced to choose: Do business with American investors or do business with their enemies.

The time has come to privatize management of the North Korean crisis. Rather than rely on the Communist Chinese — the putative “honest-broker” in the Six-Party Talks — or our deeply conflicted allies in South Korea voluntarily to bring an end to the danger we face from Pyongyang, we must call on the American people to create incentives for ending this danger by divesting North Korea.

I think that would work. There is nothing more scary to South Koreans and South Korean companies than a boycott. I think a boycott has the potential to change their behavior. Lets hope the campaign for a boycott gains steam.

Read the rest of the editorial for yourself.


24 Responses to “South Korea’s enabling of North Korea”

  1. comment number 1 by: Errol

    This should call the Korean Peninsula’s bluff. Those damn’d yankees know what they’re doing.

    It’s all very well having a nuke but there’s only one nation that’s demonstrated that it’s not bluffing when it’s necessary to drop a couple on another country to preserve the lives of its people.

    What are King Kim Jong-il and his vassal Noh Mu-hyeon going to do if Korean financial assets are locked up and foreign pension funds start ramping up their withdrawal from the Korean stockmarket?

    Drop a nuke on Tokyo or continue their current policy of shifting Korean investment funds to China and India? The Korean economies are already imploding simultaneously and the Korean voters are going to crucify Noh and his cronies, to whom he has already given golden parachutes in the form of ministerial portfolios, dubious Jeollanamdo pork barrels and sleazy sinecures for superannuated bureaucrats running FEZs.

    To deal with the Korean Peninsula Problem (KPP) Bush – and whoever is the next POTUS (maybe Obama) – will need to squeeze the Korean Peninsula’s economy like a boa constrictor.

  2. comment number 2 by: seouldout

    With the exception of a few perishables I’ve been boycotting Korean-made products for years, and I live in Korea. It should cause no distress to anyone other than the South Koreans for individual Americans to do likewise. It’s the economy above all for the South Koreans. You want to see responsible behavior? Kick ’em where it hurts the most; their pocketbook.

  3. comment number 3 by: James

    Rev. Moon’s paper on the offensive!

  4. comment number 4 by: GarlicBreath

    This guy is dead on, in so many ways.

    impediment is posed by our nominal ally, South Korea.

    Nominal is right in that Korea is an ally of America in name only.

    He is also correct in that there is a direct relationship in south korean aid and the development of the N korea bomb. (no amount of proof will satisfy the Korean natioalists on the connection)

    At the same time, American citizens should immediately review their portfolios, including their pension funds (both public ones such as the Federal Thrift Savings Plan and private ones like mutual funds). Hyundai, Samsung and others companies helping our enemies should be forced to choose: Do business with American investors or do business with their enemies.

    Lastly, as I have said before, the US and Japan should start to put pressure on South Korean companies. His suggestion is to dump stock of S Ko companies. I agree. Divest Korea.

  5. comment number 5 by: Errol

    Record amounts of foreign capital are fleeing Korea the result of dumb economic policies; pillorying companies like Lonestar and Starbucks and wasting money on moonshine projects that help Noh’s relatives in various villages across Korea.

    There’s about a 30% discount on Korea’s stocks relative to their price-earnings ratios. Perhaps some Koreans with capital reserves could pick up some bargains but it’s more likely they’ll continue buying Chinese stocks, building motor vehicle plants in India and living high on the hog with Japanese TVs, French brandy, German cars and Italian fashion.

    As for those without any capital reserves they’ll just have to pay their credit card bills any which way they can because there isn’t going to be any boom in legitimate jobs for young men under Noh’s watch.

    Expect another upsurge in the number of oppas and namdongsaengs living off the earnings of their girlfriends.

  6. comment number 6 by: GarlicBreath

    Errol, business people are no fools.

    There’s about a 30% discount on Korea’s stocks relative to their price-

    They recognize that the Korean economy is full of dishonest accounting.

  7. comment number 7 by: Errol

    It’s not just dishonest accounting in the private sector. Foreign investors also have to allow for the legal and governmental context of Korea that inflates all sorts of prices with under-the-table accounting and especially the inflation of real estate prices – for both businesses and private housing – with a massive flow-on effect to the rest of the economy.

    The Korea Trade Commission bangs on about the need for more transparency for Korean companies but the number of sleazy American educated Mr Thirty Percent lawyers in some of the Korean quasi-autonomous government entities is the major impediment to domestic companies investing in Korea let alone foreign companies.

    As they say, office public servant by day: room salon gangster at night.

    If he ain’t handsome and tall
    Or he ain’t working for Samsung Anycall
    where’d he get the money for the pretty goil?

  8. comment number 8 by: Travolta

    If a boycott is to work then it needs to be advertised to the masses. I can’t see it happening. You will have all the Koreans in LA, Seoul, Busan and anywhere else there may be a Korean going fucking NUTS in the street. Kicking over shit and setting fires. It may very well push the middle ground Koreans closer to the left wingers who will say “Look! We told you, the Yanks fucking hate us! See? We ARE the victims!” The American embassy in Seoul will be smashed up, army bases will have riots busting out everywhere.

    Frankly I’m all for a boycott, as of right now I have already started. Korea needs a good shake down.

  9. comment number 9 by: GarlicBreath

    Good points Travolta, but you see Koreans already hate the Americans. The Americans are well meaning but somewhat dim witted in realizing the amout of hatred and contemp koreans have for them. For an example just look at some of the k-blogs and read what the likes of JK, young rocco, bluejives or etc say.

    One thing is for certain, anything that helps end the one sided relationship between Korea and the USA is good. Also note that Koreans go berzerk over any and everything. To see them go apeshit over a boycott is really nothing new.

  10. comment number 10 by: mattrosencrance

    At the risk of sounding really radical, not only is purchasing SoKo technogoodies indirectly supporting the NorK regime, but the US-ROK alliance itself is culpable of the same due to what the SoKos are doing with it.

    If we take another example, after the Marshal plan was enacted and the US rebuilt Europe, two things happened: 1) the US developed a military that can act as an umbrella for about 20 countries and 2) the Europeans invested in a socialist system, basically creature comforts, since they didn’t have to really invest in their military.

    The SoKos, in their own corrupt fashion, build their country up from nothing while imagining that they did it all on their own without extensive American funds and know-how. At least the Europeans acknowledge our contribution, even if the French do so begrudgingly. I don’t think it’s enough to boycott SoKo products. I think the US-ROK Alliance has failed because it supported the Sunshine policy, which in turn has failed. Their designs and the US designs for the NorKs are so incompatible that the Alliance should be dissolved. In this way, the US is free to defend Japan and take whatever action we like against the NorKs without worrying about the ingrates south of the 38th.

    I taught at Konkuk University in eastern Seoul and got to see plenty of banners similar to the NorK art on this posting. Let’s let the SoKos in Iraq go home. They’d rather be in a PC bang than talking to girls; not indicative of quality soldiers. They intentionally have the easiest beat anyways. Let’s save the billions that we give them yearly for their defense. If we don’t give that, then they’ll have to rethink throwing money into Kaesong and Geumgangsan.

  11. comment number 11 by: GarlicBreath

    The SoKos, in their own corrupt fashion, build their country up from nothing while imagining that they did it all on their own without extensive American funds and know-how

    They did it because of Japanese infrastructure and after the Korean war, because the USA gave them preferential trade policies. Furthermore, japan and the USA built up the Korean economy by aid and allowing free riding.

    The list goes on and on, but the miracle on the Han is just a myth. Korea owes its development to Japan and the USA.

  12. comment number 12 by: mattrosencrance

    @ garlicbreath

    Right you are. I had college students there who told me how the Japanese annexation of Korea was worse than the Nazi Holocaust. When I took images from this site to show them in class of how the Japanese built infrastructure and then Nazis basically just destroyed cities, they were unmoved. When I explained to them that the Nazis did something worse than kill Jews, that they killed their own loyal countrymen who just happen to be Jewish, amongst the millions of victims at the death camps over three years and that only 200,000 some odd Koreans were disappeared over 35 years (not that that’s a walk in the park), the numbers couldn’t sway them. After explaining how the Nazis worked for the detriment of the world, even the German people, whereas the Japanese developed infrastructure and doubled the Korean lifespan, I showed them another picture from this website of a Korean actress sipping a coffee in a posh Seoul cafe. I asked them if they thought that a Jewess could casually sip a latte in an upscale Viennese or Berlin cafe between 39 and 45, let alone 42 and 45. They didn’t flinch.

    I had a lot of good smart students, but this inability to recognize simple causal relationships and a willingness to perpetrate and dwell within myths (as you rightly call them) are a feature of their failed educational systems and self-defeating propaganda.

    So again I say, let us (the US) take our troops and money out of there so that they and we can be freer to do as we like. It’s not so suprising that a people so low in self-efficacy would pass the buck and claim to be hindered by their allies. Let’s let them be. In 1905 Roosevelt called Korea a failed state. Now North Korea is a failed state just over 100 years later. Let’s let them do what they do best on their own.

  13. comment number 13 by: YoungRocco

    Matt:

    What’s up?

    That is a huge sum of money invested in North Korean infrastructure. Surely this new infrastructure was either used for, or freed up the resources for, the North Korean nuclear program.

    Surely you have proof for this claim!

  14. comment number 14 by: YoungRocco

    Errol:

    This should call the Korean Peninsula’s bluff. Those damn’d yankees know what they’re doing.

    If only they did.

    The only complication is that Kim Il Sung gave uncle sam a run for his money back in the fifties. His son, Kim Jong Il, in the current era continues to snub his nose at Bush while building nuclear weapons.

    And all the while, America makes bluster about imposing sanctions.

    While begging China to pitch in.

    The fact of the matter, is that Uncle Sam is still reeling from the shock of being bested by some poor yellow folks.

    Bottomline: Uncle Sam has no idea what it is doing, which is why America’s erstwhile allies are forced to devise their own foreign policies with respect to North Korea.

    The Korean economies are already imploding simultaneously

    You’ve failed to do your homework.

    Korean economic growth from the last quarter alone was 0.9% Korea’s year to year economic growth(GDP) is slated to grow at about 4.8 percent this quarter.

    References: http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=a.zmzOfXypW4&refer=home

    This is basic economics, my friend. You should have the humility to check your facts before you speak. Do the due-dilligence.

    As for the rest of your theories…

    I’ll regard them with the same respect I normally accord most ill-informed, wrathful ramblings.

  15. comment number 15 by: YoungRocco

    Garlic-Breath:

    Hello, Comrade 😉

    You never cease to amaze me. No matter how many times I disprove your speculations, you continue to repeat them.

    That’s tenacity if I’ve ever seen it.

    Take this for example:

    Nominal is right in that Korea is an ally of America in name only.

    False.

    I’ve already mentioned South Korea’s involvement in aiding the United States in the Vietnam and Iraq Wars, as well as South Korea’s steps towards implementing the new sanctions imposed under UN resolution 1718. However, you keep on harping on about how South Korea is not an ally of the United States. Garlic Breath, stop ignoring facts and have the courage and humility to admit when you’ve made a mistake.

    He is also correct in that there is a direct relationship in south korean aid and the development of the N korea bomb. (no amount of proof will satisfy the Korean natioalists on the connection)

    How would you know? You have thus far not even offered a shred of evidence to support this claim.

    Give me some numbers, Garlic-Breath. How many centrifuges did the KWP import? Was there an increase in uranium mining? How about growth in spending for North Korea’s nuclear program? You don’t even have these basic numbers, comrade, and thus anything you say on this issue is without traction.

    All you do is speculate.

    His suggestion is to dump stock of S Ko companies. I agree. Divest Korea.

    I sincerely hope you are not a fund advisor for a mutual or hedge fund.

    I doubt you could even beat the Dow Jones utilities index.

    With South Korea having grown for 14 straight quarters at a rate exceeding 4% per year, and with projected economic growth at 4.6% this quarter South Korea is indeed an attractive place to invest. Japan, on the other hand, is just emerging from a decade long recession and is expcected to grow at less than 2% this year. Furthermore, with renewed growth in semiconductors, mobile handsets and flatpanel LCDs, Korean electronics firms are solid places to place money. (Samsung electronics posted record profits this year…While Sony’s third quarter profits fell 94%)

    References: 1. http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=a.zmzOfXypW4&refer=home

    2. http://business.guardian.co.uk/story/0,,1932574,00.html

    Bottomline: Don’t listen to Garlic-Breath for investment advice.

    I eagerly await to read your response.

  16. comment number 16 by: YoungRocco

    Errol:

    At first, I thought I knew more than you about politics.

    Looks like I know more than you about economics as well.

    Record amounts of foreign capital are fleeing Korea the result of dumb economic policies; pillorying companies like Lonestar and Starbucks

    ‘Pillorying” Lonestar?

    You have a gift for spin. but I think the readers of Occidentalism deserve better than propaganda.

    Lonestar engaged in illegal business practices under Korean Law. As such, they deserve to be investigated. The idea is quite simple really: When companies conduct business illegally, then they deserve to be punished. When the CEOs of MCI Worldcom and Enron were found to be guilty of defrauding investors, they were sent to jail and their companies were audited.

    Bottomline: Companies that break the law deserve punishment.

    moonshine projects that help Noh’s relatives in various villages across Korea.

    You really demonstrate your ignorance of economics with the above statement.

    “Moonshine” projects transfer money from the public to the private sector. In other words, “Moonshine” projects increase corporate revenues. If Korea’s moonshine projects were as extensive as you imply, that would be reason for managers to invest in the Korean capital market rather than divest.

    There’s about a 30% discount on Korea’s stocks relative to their price-earnings ratios.

    The above statement doesn’t make sense. How can Korean stocks be discounted relative to themselves?

    Surely, you must have meant that there is a discount on Korean stocks relative to similar stocks in developed countries? Or perhaps you meant that there is a discount on Korean stocks relative to their values in previous years, but what you’ve said above needs drastic rewording.

    Perhaps some Koreans with capital reserves could pick up some bargains but it’s more likely they’ll continue buying Chinese stocks

    I haven’t read any stories detailing Sino-Korean Koreans securities investments, so I assume your little side comment about Koreans buying Chinese stocks was for rhetorical effect. The KOSPI index has been a better performer than the HANG SENG over the past couple of years:

    In 2005, the Kospi index reported a gain of 54 percent in U.S. dollars, doubling its points from the previous two years and earning the honor as the best performing stock market in the world. This has left many financial analysts and market spectators arguing that the Kospi has surpassed the trading activities of the S&P index futures contracts, noting the value of the Kospi futures and options contracts, back in the first have of 2003, as $10 trillion vs. $3 trillion of the S&P futures and options contracts. During this same period, the Kospi futures contracts traded $33.4 million, while the Kospi options contracts traded $1.37 billion. South Korea’s accomplishments have encouraged new business ventures and created opportunities for institutional investors to capitalize in the Kospi composite index. The Bank of Korea expects the economy to grow by 5 percent in 2006, an increase from 3.9 percent in 2005.

    Reference: http://secure.imn.org/~conference/im/index2.cfm?page=agenda.cfm&sys_code=20060930_IM_0024&header=on

    Errol, these are basic facts that anyone can search through Google.

    I mean…aren’t you the least bit embarrassed that you publicly make such baldly false statements?

    Expect another upsurge in the number of oppas and namdongsaengs living off the earnings of their girlfriends.

    Well, with the knowledge of economics you’ve exhibited today, you certainly must be one of those oppas!

    Unless of course, you are an English teacher.
    🙂

  17. comment number 17 by: YoungRocco

    Mattrosencrance:

    Your posts are full of inaccuracies.

    I mean, either you don’t know what you’re talking about, or you’re outright lying just to make a point.

    Either options are disrespectful to the readers of this board.

    Let’s begin:

    If we take another example, after the Marshal plan was enacted and the US rebuilt Europe, two things happened[…]the Europeans invested in a socialist system, basically creature comforts, since they didn’t have to really invest in their military.

    This stands out as the most ridiculous of your claims. The Europeans didn’t have to invest in their military? What history books have you been reading, Matt? Looking at the world’s top military spenders throws cold-water on what you’ve said:

    1 United States 478,200,000,000 2005
    European Union 220,000,000,000 2006 est.
    2 United Kingdom 48,300,000,000 2005
    3 France 46,200,000,000 2005
    4 Japan 42,100,000,000 2005
    5 China 41,000,000,000 2005 est.
    6 Germany 40,200,000,000 2005
    7 Italy 27,200,000,000 2005
    8 Saudi Arabia 25,200,000,000 2005
    9 South Korea 21,600,000,000 2005

    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_military_expenditures

    All your talk about how South Koreans don’t know history…and yet…

    Anyways.

    Let’s address the rest of your errors.

    In this way, the US is free to defend Japan and take whatever action we like against the NorKs without worrying about the ingrates south of the 38th.

    This statement also reflects another failure in reasoning on your part. Matt, there are two key reasons why your claim fails to make sense:

    1. If the U.S. withdraws its troops from Korea, it will be interpreted by North Korea as a sign of weakness. This will in turn increase the bellicosity of the North Korean regime.

    2. The U.S. has implied that containing China is one of its future objectives for the region. Matt, When one country wants to contain another, it increase the number of troops around its target, it doesn’t decrease that number.

    Bottomline:

    Mattrosencrance, Errol, Garlic-Breath, etc, you guys need to let go of your victim mentality. Stop blaming Koreans for your emotional dysfunctions:

    1. Fear:

    If you’re afraid of North Korean nukes, stop whining and get proactive. Stop blaming South Koreans for your fears of Kim Jong Il.

    2. Under-Appreciation

    You guys complain a bit too much. Must you guys wail in every post about how much gratitude you feel you deserve from Koreans?

    Does it make you feel good when you read about American contributions to Korean economic development? Does it make you feel sad when American contributions aren’t mentioned? I mean, if you feel that every single article about Korean economic development must pay tribute to the United States, perhaps you should see a counselor about boosting low self-esteem.

    I eagerly await to read your responses, Gentlemen.

  18. comment number 18 by: tomato

    Wow…three long comments in a row!
    I would say that this would count as “hijacking”.

    Are South Koreans ultranationalists still mansei-ing themselves? Distrorting history to show that Koreans are somehow smarter and better than the Chinese and Japanese? And what if the Koreans are better than the Chinese and Japanese? Does it make S Korea richer or more technologically advanced than Japan? Or does it make Korean civilization more influential than China’s?

    Is the Roh regime helping the same-blood regime in the north while turning faces away from the fact that the same regime is torturuing those of precisous same-blood? Is the SK regime still yapping to the world that Japan is the agressor in the Far East? All the while China is entering good relations with Japan and US congressman thinking about boycotting S Korean industries that are supporting the despotic N Korean regime?

    May there be peace to the world, YoungRocco.

  19. comment number 19 by: Errol

    Tomato Youngrocco has a lot of free time because he’s a YoungKoreanman. As can be seen from the attached link in 2004 65.3 % of YoungKoreanmen and YoungKoreanwomen had a lot of free time. Perhaps they’re in the army, studying or otherwise deferring joining the workforce, living off their girlfriends or mommy.

    2004 data 2006 is worse for Youngkoreans

    in 2004, only 32.8 % of young Australians were not in the workforce which neatly matches tertiary education rates in Australia.

    YoungRocco Said:

    October 27, 2006 at 12:56 pm

    Well, with the knowledge of economics you’ve exhibited today, you certainly must be one of those oppas!

    Unless of course, you are an English teacher.
    🙂

    Your English is real good
    Youngrocco and we sure all appreciate that you visit Occidentalism for free English lessons.

    Now have a good hard look at the linked graph … talk to mommy … and we sure all would like to see how good you are at mathematics.

    All those young Australian women working in the legitimate labour force. Australians sure don’t know much about economics, history or biology too. Shall we start counting Nobel Prizes for Medicine?

    Nothing to learn from Australians? Such arrogant pride.

  20. comment number 20 by: Errol

    YoungRocco Said:

    October 27, 2006 at 1:57 pm

    Errol:

    At first, I thought I knew more than you about politics.

    Looks like I know more than you about economics as well.

    Then yada. yada, yada then,

    I assume your little side comment about Koreans buying Chinese stocks was for rhetorical effect.

    10,923 cases of South Korean investments had been made in China, with a cumulative actual base investment value of US$14 billion.

    South Korea ranks as the fifth largest FDI source of China. Although South Korea’s FDI to China started at a later stage, following the establishment of diplomatic relations in 1992, the number of cases as well as the proportion of FDI to China in South Korea’s total FDI has far exceeded that of Japan, reaching even 60 per cent in some instances, and nearly 40 per cent in value in 2003.

    Chinese investment in South Korea is also relatively minor.

    According to Chinese figures, the number of approved Chinese-invested enterprises in South Korea reached 72 by the end of 2003, with a total investment value of approximately US$300 million. In contrast, according to South Korean figures, the number of Chinese-invested enterprises in South Korea reached 3,624 by the end of 2003, with a total investment value of approximately US$522 million.

    Economic Factfinding Lesson No. 1

    Chinese data says 300 million invested in Korea while Koreans say the Chinese have invested 512 million. What is it with this arrant boosterism by Korean public servants?

  21. comment number 21 by: tomato

    What SK did to “cooperate” since the UN sanctions:

    1. Asked US to incorporate the joint SK-NK projects in the FTA. Surely, the SKs must have been joking!

    2. Told China to stop distortion of history regarding ancient Manchuria because it was “part of Korean history”

    3. Claimed Japan to be arming up where no threat exists (and by this Japan was destabilizing the Far East, so they claim), even though an unanimous UN securiteis council sanction has been issued against NK

    4. Claimed US has fought the most wars among other countries…which probably implies that it was the Americans to be blamed for the NK nuclear test…BTW, the person who said this is going to be the next SK foreign minister.

    5. Ruling party leaders danced with NK maids in NK. What a show of unirana friendship.

  22. comment number 22 by: Errol

    Maid? Maid?

    How innocent you are Tomato.

    Room salon culture was invented by North Koreans. A Korean politician showed me his pics of a North Korean room salon, which he rapidly hid when his wife came in the room.

    The clinchers that it was North Korea was that there was no rack of 3×3 TVs, no microphones and one of the sexslaves was playing an acoustic guitar.

    No lecky in Joseon after all.

  23. comment number 23 by: ponta

    Yougrocco
    The problem regarding the US Korea alliance is whether the alliance is worth maintaining for the US.

    To put it roughly and crudely, the US thinks of North Korea as an enemy while many South Koreans seem to consider it an ally rather than an enemy and some Koreans consider the US even an enemy.

    A recent public opinion poll sponsored by the Choson Ilbo revealed that 65.9 percent of Koreans born in the 1980s (ages 16-25) said they would side with North Korea in the event of a war between North Korea and the United StatesTime to End the Korean War: The Korean Nuclear Crisis in the Era of Unification

    .
    And however much you emphasize the contribution South Korea has made to the ally, it is difficult to maintain the alliance when the strategic purposes are different. The discussion of the South Korean contribution should be viewed in this regard.

    And I don’t think you understand the point of American contribution to the Korea mentioned by some commenter.
    I don’t think American people want the words of appreciation from South Korea, but their complains is basically this, do they deserve the blames they receive from South Korean people despite the fact the US has been keeping promises and agreement that the US and South Korea have made, despite the fact the US has been contributing to Korea?

    I think South Korea has been putting their blame in the wrong place.
    Their blame , the first and foremost, should have been on KJI.

    And again it is South Korea that has to prove that the money from South Korea has not been helping North Korea build nuclear weapon.
    It is not sufficient enough to say it is logically possible that that is not the case: With the sufficient indirect evidence to the effect the money from South Korea was vitally important, it is South Korea that shoulder the burden of proof.

  24. comment number 24 by: buy hydrocodone online

    buy hydrocodone online…

    news…