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Speech at Yasukuni Shrine

March 26th, 2007 . by Matt

Here is a speech by Taiwanese Jin Mei Lin about the importance of Yasukuni shrine to the families of the war dead, and explains why Yasukuni Shrine cannot be replaced by a secular memorial or alternative shrine. The video was put up and subtitled by Occidentalism commenter oniazuma, who has been doing a good job translating Japanese TV into English.


47 Responses to “Speech at Yasukuni Shrine”

  1. comment number 1 by: void

    When I heard this speech, I was very impressed and shame on me not payed much attention on the issue. I’m not a devote Shinto man, but I feld it must be duty of us to hold the shrine for our past soldiers.

  2. comment number 2 by: pacifist

    I once saw Jin Mei Lin at a hotel in Taipei. She looked like a very wise and courteous woman.
    .
    I thank her for commenting adequate comments for Japan like this, but at the same time I feel a kind of shame of the situation that we had to make Taiwanese woman to explain about Yasukuni.

  3. comment number 3 by: SuikaDorobo

    I guess her name is Mei Ling, not Mei Lin. Splendid speech anyway.

  4. comment number 4 by: Gerry-Bevers

    Wow! She is a powerful speaker.

  5. comment number 5 by: kteen

    You people remind me of the telletubbies; jumping around like mad when others don’t give a damn about them.
    Btw, it’s pretty unhealthy to sit in front of your computer 24/7. Why don’t you get some fresh air?

  6. comment number 6 by: void

    You are so lovely, kteen 🙂

  7. comment number 7 by: Calagatha

    It amazes moi how some individuals
    (such as kteen) tend to troll around blogs or websites that they do not approve of.
    Personally when I don’t agree with a message or
    an agenda that a given website may have.
    I usually just act as if the site in question doesn’t exist.

    Personally I’m getting sick & tired of seeing every post that deals with Japan being degenerated into a bitch fest.
    What’s sad is that this seems to be common behaviour lately regarding almost every Japanese related site,forum or blog that I visit.

    Way too many asian teens these days are nothing than armchair politicians…

  8. comment number 8 by: Calagatha

    typo should say *nothing more than*

  9. comment number 9 by: kteen

    ‘When in Rome, do as the Romans do’….
    I’m just sticking to the word.

  10. comment number 10 by: sayuri

    Hi, Gerry,

    Just for your information:
    http://www.sdh-fact.com/CL02_3/result.php

  11. comment number 11 by: empraptor

    It seems contradictory, her being Taiwanese and telling Japanese what to do with Yasukuni all the while telling them that they should not let non-Japanese telling them what to do with Yasukuni.

    I suppose she feels she still has some ties to Japan? If she has some say in Yasukuni for this reason, what is fundamentally different about what other formerly Japanese <insert nationality> persons or governments representing them say about Yasukuni?

  12. comment number 12 by: ponta

    empraptor
    IMO, It is not Taiwanese telling Non-Japanese what to do, but it is believers telling non-believers not to interfere with the prayer.

  13. comment number 13 by: empraptor

    I’m watching it again. It still sounds to me like she’s saying all Japanese should go to Yasukuni and that all non-Japanese should keep their opinion about Yasukuni to themselves.

    I suppose she does relate religion into it in saying that a Japanese is not entitled to be a Japanese if they do not go to Yasukuni. Do you have to practice Shintoism in order to be Japanese? Why can they not pay respects according to their religion or lack thereof?

  14. comment number 14 by: ponta

    Okay I have watched it again.
    She is saying that Japanese are ungrateful if they object to them praying for the war-dead, and she tells non-Japanese who oppose them, “not your business”
    Sure there is a part in which she says Japanese are not entitled to be Japanese if they oppose their prayer, but it seems clear that is a figure of speech.

    Basically she is not saying you should pray for the war-dead, but she is saying mind just your own business if you don’t want to pray.

  15. comment number 15 by: stannn

    Hey, weren’t the war criminals enshrined in yasukuni? Isn’t that the reason why japanese PM was criticized to visit and pray for them there?
    Will german president be criticized if he/her goes to Hitler’s tomb and pray for him?

  16. comment number 16 by: egg

    stannn,

    Hey, weren’t the war criminals enshrined in yasukuni? Isn’t that the reason why japanese PM was criticized to visit and pray for them there?

    I think that is not the reason of criticism. The main reason of criticism is the fear of violataing our constitution about the seperation of politics and religion. The government is prohibited to interfere against or support religion. The ones who criticise have the same intention as you in their heart but I think it is not the main point of our arguments.

    Will german president be criticized if he/her goes to Hitler’s tomb and pray for him?

    War criminals are enshrined there but they are not the only ones who are enshrined. Anyway I think that war criminals conpensated by their lives already, and I don`t like to beat a deadman`s body. I don`t mind Korea or China beating them in their country but do it in their own country. I wish people in the world stop claiming a groundless suspition of Japan going back to militerism and so on. And the reason for their claim is that the prime minister went there.
    I wonder why the Korean and Chinese people are criticising about militarism growing in Japan when their countries are spending more to the military in their budget. (I mean the growth of money spent compared to the previous year.)
    Which country admires militarism more now? It is quite obvious, at least to me.

  17. comment number 17 by: empraptor

    Basically she is not saying you should pray for the war-dead, but she is saying mind just your own business if you don’t want to pray.

    Now I see that that’s what she is saying. Is there a big opposition to Yasukuni within Japan? I’d imagine there is a memorial built by the Japanese government that anyone could visit.

  18. comment number 18 by: ponta

    Is there a big opposition to Yasukuni within Japan?

    There IS a big opposition.
    In general, the leftist, and those who side with China opposed it.

    I’d imagine there is a memorial built by the Japanese government that anyone could visit.

    There is a war memorial run by non-governmental organization.

  19. comment number 19 by: stannn

    egg,

    The main reason of criticism is the fear of violataing our constitution about the seperation of politics and religion.

    I didn’t know about that, quite interesting.

    Anyway, why don’t japanese people separate those war criminals from others?
    until then, japanese PM’s visiting and praying in the yaskuni will only strain the relations between japan and neighbors.

  20. comment number 20 by: egg

    stannn, thank you for your reply. My comments were emotional and I would like to apologize for that. Sorry.

    Anyway, why don’t japanese people separate those war criminals from others?

    It is a difficult problem. We may if we could. But we can`t.
    I may be able to explain it like this.
    In Japan, people are burned before funerals when they die. Nowadays some people want their ashes to be spread in the sea or in the forest and so on. Now, after that is done, can you separate and collect the ashes from the nature? If you think you can, I think you can separate the war criminal`s spirit from the others. But they say they can`t. At least, that is the doctrine which Yasukuni shrine is claiming. Once it is enshrined and mixed? with other spirits, you cannot separate it.
    They have a freedom of religions and I can`t change their doctrine. It is so complicated, tangled and difficult. Don`t you have any good idea?

  21. comment number 21 by: empraptor

    I watched it yet again, and something else stands out.

    She speaks of soldiers protecting Taiwan and Japan. What did they protect these lands from? Wasn’t invasion (e.g. of China), not defense, the soldiers’ main task back then?

    egg mentioned separation of church and state. I don’t see how constitutional issues come into play if Yasukuni is a private shrine with no government ties.

    But I call BS on not being able to separate spirits. As if there were some inflexable physical law to spirits. They are a private organization. If they don’t want to do it they should just say that.

  22. comment number 22 by: egg

    empraptor thank you for your comment.
    I hope I understood your intention correctly and you can take the meanaings of my words.

    I don’t see how constitutional issues come into play if Yasukuni is a private shrine with no government ties.

    If Abe went to a christian church or somewhere which is concidered to have no ties with the government, as a Japanese prime minister, I think it would be a probrem too. I interpret Japanese constitution that way and those who think like me is not a minority among the scholars about the constitution, I think.

    As if there were some inflexable physical law to spirits. They are a private organization. If they don’t want to do it they should just say that.

    I think the Yasukuni shrine is just saying that. I mean they are saying they cannot separate the spirits. I suppose the Yasukuni shrine thinks the doctrine as a “some inflexable physical law to spirits”. Anyway it is their doctrine and no one can interfere with them without violataing the Japanese constitution.

  23. comment number 23 by: ponta

    What did they protect these lands from? Wasn’t invasion (e.g. of China), not defense, the soldiers’ main task back then?”

    where there is a war, solider do not fight, believing they are invading, they believe they fight for, say, freedom, democracy, protection of the land, life-line.

    I don’t see how constitutional issues come into play if Yasukuni is a private shrine with no government ties.

    Consititutional issues come into play at least in two senses.
    (1)when someone, China, Korea, or any citizen, complains of the spirit of A criminal enshrined, does government have right to order the shrine, private entity, to remove it?
    The answer is no.
    (2) When PM visit the shrine, does it not violate the principle of the separation of s state and religion?
    The court have used test smililar to the lemon test to examine it.
    So far, roughly, it is judged that unless PM follows the ritual of shinto, it is not unconsitutional.

    But I call BS on not being able to separate spirits. As if there were some inflexable physical law to spirits.

    There is no physical law, the souls are not physical, and impossiblity is based on the their religious belief.

    For the record, I am not a believer of shinto, I have never visited yasukuni except once: I just wanted to know what the war museum the media was talking about was like.

    They are a private organization. If they don’t want to do it they should just say that.

    They are saying that.

  24. comment number 24 by: egg

    My post at 22

    I think it would be a probrem too

    should be

    I think it is a probrem too

    Sorry.

  25. comment number 25 by: empraptor

    Why does it become unconstitutional for Abe to visit Yasukuni he practices Shinto? Doesn’t he, as an idividual, have freedom to practice his religion of choice?

    I’d have expected that it is more problematic if he didn’t practice Shinto yet went to Yasukuni. Not necessarily unconstitutional, but you’d get to thinking that if he’s not there for religious purposes he’s not there as an individual but rather as representative of the government.

  26. comment number 26 by: egg

    I think you have misunderstood his meanings here.

    So far, roughly, it is judged that unless PM follows the ritual of shinto, it is not unconsitutional.

    Sorry, I should mind my own business, I know..

  27. comment number 27 by: ponta

    # empraptor s
    the lemon test

    The purpose of the Lemon test is to determine when a law has the effect of establishing religion. The test has served as the foundation for many of the Court’s post-1971 establishment clause rulings. As articulated by Chief Justice Burger, the test has three parts:

    First, the statute must have a secular legislative purpose; second, its principal or primary effect must be one that neither advances nor inhibits religion; finally, the statute must not foster “an excessive government entanglement with religion.”

    link

    It is judged that when PM follow the ritual as required by shinto, it might promote shinto.

    you’d get to thinking that if he’s not there for religious purposes he’s not there as an individual but rather as representative of the government

    He visits there as an individual and he probably visits there for a “religious”i purpose in mind, but not to promote any particular religion.

  28. comment number 28 by: ponta

    and of course, PM has a freedom to faith as an individual.

  29. comment number 29 by: mattrosencrance

    I liked her speech, but was a little surprised that her first reaction to her hecklers was to order the US out.

    Is this just a silly knee jerk reaction?

    It’s a pity that America can’t support the Taiwanese as openly as we do the Japanese, but doesn she not appreciate all those fancy weapons that her people will get to use if the mainland ever follows through on its rhetoric?

  30. comment number 30 by: Lily

    The woman’s right. The dead (except for the war criminals) deserve their respect. Think about it this way: No amount of praying will save the war criminals from the eternal suffering they are most definitely going through. That should be retribution enough.

  31. comment number 31 by: egg

    By the way, I don`t agree with separating the war criminal`s spirits, so my post 20

    We may if we could. But we can`t.

    should be

    I don`t think we should but even if we wanted to separate the spirits, we can`t.

    They have a freedom of religions and I can`t change their doctrine. It is so complicated, tangled and difficult. Don`t you have any good idea?

    shold be deleted.
    Sorry for misleading.
    stannn

    japanese PM’s visiting and praying in the yaskuni will only strain the relations between japan and neighbors.

    I understand what you say and I think, your saying so, is reasonable for you. And I don`t want to see the relationship strained.
    But on the other hand, including the war criminals, they are our ancestors and I believe they did what they thought to be good for Japan. The result of their act ended in a catastrophe for Japan and such a
    great disaster for Asian people. But still, how sinful they are, they are our ancestors.
    I have no intention to honour them, or to be proud of them, but still I want them to rest in peace.
    I understand that the victims will feel unpleasant about the enshrining though.

  32. comment number 32 by: empraptor

    He visits there as an individual and he probably visits there for a “religious”i purpose in mind, but not to promote any particular religion.

    Right. So I don’t see how whatever the PM does at the shrine in his free time can be seen as the government sponsoring Shinto. Why the restriction that he shouldn’t follow Shinto rituals?

  33. comment number 33 by: ponta

    Why the restriction that he shouldn’t follow Shinto rituals?

    The court judgement is that if he followed the ritual as reuired by Shinto, and if he showed he was doing it in public, it would promote a specific religion as against other religions.

  34. comment number 34 by: stannn

    hey egg,
    I can see your point that after the death, all crimes are resolved in japanese culture(or religion).
    I am not going to argue against that.

    But I am a little surprised that japan doesn’t have a national memorial like other countries.

    Also according to wiki, there seems to be some controversy in 2006,

    On 20 July 2006, Nihon Keizai Shimbun front-paged an article about the discovery of a memorandum detailing the reason Emperor Hirohito stopped visiting Yasukuni. The memorandum, kept by former chief of Imperial Household Agency Tomohiko Tomita, confirms for the first time the enshrinement of the 14 Class A War Criminals was the reason.

    Wiki also says

    the revelation clearly shifts the focus of the controversy to the enshrinement of class A war criminals, meaning that the issue of the separation between the state and the church is no longer the main focus. The public opinion is split between those on the left who advocate the removal and those on the right who nonetheless object to the removal.

    So wiki says that the issue of the separation between the state and the church is no longer the main focus.

    I am not 100% sure whether wiki is a reliable source. So I want to know your opiniion about this memorandum thing?

    I also checked out Yasukuni’s webpage and found out this article from the main page,
    “The worship of ancestors by the people of Japan.”

    And in this article, there’s a subsection titled “A CORRECT VIEW OF HISTORY”.

    And it says that

    “Isn’t it a fact that the West with its military power invaded and ruled over much of Asia and Africa and that this was the start of East-West relations? There is no uncertainty in history. Japan’s dream of building a Great East Asia was necessitated by history and it was sought after by the countries of Asia. We cannot overlook the intent of those who wish to tarnish the good name of the noble souls of Yasukuni.”

    If Yasukuni is just a religious place, then
    Why this kind of controversial political view is expressed in its webpage?

  35. comment number 35 by: Toshiharu Honda

    Not only leftists but many of the other faith
    followers like christians do not like Yasukuni.
    I, an atheist, regard Yasukuni as a cult and
    do not vist Yasukuni.

  36. comment number 36 by: egg

    stannn, nice to see you. Thank you for your reply.
    There may be points that I have misunderstood, but I will try my best to answer your questions.

    But I am a little surprised that japan doesn’t have a national memorial like other countries.

    Yasukuni was built in 1869 to enshrine the one`s who fought and died for the Meiji government in the Boshin war(internal disturbances right after the Edo period). From then all who served for the government were enshrined there. It was “a national memorial” for Japan. It sounds like playing with words but there were even times that shintou was thought not to be a religion but an activity of the country.
    After Japan lost WW2 and occupation by the GHQ started, they tried to destroy Yasukuni. But by cutting the ties with the government off and becoming a private shrine, Yasukuni managed to survive(This explantion, I am not so sure). Even after the Yasukuni became a private shrine, I guess the Japanese people thought no other place was fit for the memorial, as many soldiers who went to the war said to each other “Afer we die in the battle, let`s meet at Yasukuni” . Japanese people might have thought that if they changed the memorial, the soldier`s spirit cannot come home. And there are arguments now but still there is no concensus among the Japanese people to build a new national memorial or not. So, there are other memorials like Chidorigafuchi which is organised by the half private sector but I think there is none which is operated by the government.

    So I want to know your opiniion about this memorandum thing?

    The ones who oppose against the prime minister`s visits, first mentioned to the constitution to strengthen their arguments. After the constitutional issues failed to get their supporters(Many public opinion poll showed the number of the Japanese people who aprove to the visits, compared to those who oppose, were the majority. But I personally think the way he goes now has a probrem.), they seem to use the emperor`s comment although they dislike the emperor. I don`t think it an honourable attitude but I admit they had some impact on Japanese society(The polls turned.). I didn`t think the incident important but thinking twice, my reply16 was subjective. I want to apologize for that. But still I think the essential part of the argument is the constitutional probrem. If it can be cleared I think there is no good reasoning for the opposing ones.

    I kind of honour the emperor and the emperor is the symbol of Japan, but he is no longer a supreme ruler. He has no political rights and he is not allowed to make a pollitical comments and decisions. When he is acting politicaly, he is acting under the strict control of the Japanese cabinet. Of course as a private man he may express his opinions(but not against the public), but those should not be revealed. At least our constitution says so.
    I understand Hirohito`s emotions but what relations does it have to the controversies? The Yasukuni will decide the ones whom they will enshrine. If the constitutional probrem is solved, then the people of Japan will decide whether it is politicaly apropriate for the prime minister to go or not, but again I think there is no good reasoning to oppose.

    If Yasukuni is just a religious place, then
    Why this kind of controversial political view is expressed in its webpage?

    It may sound kind of double standard but they are a private shrine and they are trying to speak aloud for their believers, I guess. For the war bereaved, it is hard to think their family died meaninglessly. Don`t you agree with me? But I think we should face the both sides of history. And I think Yasukuni should stop telling those one sided stotries.
    But on the other hand, it doesn`t mean that the ones who visit there have the same idea with Yasukuni. There is a logical leap.

    My conclusion is that our constitution prohibits the government to suport a private religion. So, if the prime minister wants to go there, he should go there silently and if he is asked, he should make it clear that he goes there as a private man and has nothing to do with his official position. The mass media should ignore his act. If the mass media ignores it, his act will not cause much effect.
    I think the way Yasukuni thinks is not apropriate but at the same time I cannot accept a foreign country interefering with this matter.
    Sorry if my words sound harsh, I have no intention of offence and I am loking forward for your reply.

  37. comment number 37 by: ponta

    Why this kind of controversial political view is expressed in its webpage?

    What is wrong with Bible talking about crazy history of the world?
    What is wrong with the US site of Arlington cemetery talking about the Iraqi invasion as the pursuit of freedom and democracy?

    They would say “not your business”

  38. comment number 38 by: egg

    ponta,

    They would say “not your business”

    Are you saying Yasukuni is not the appropriate place to face the dark side of our history?

  39. comment number 39 by: ponta

    egg
    As the logical conclusion of Shinto, I think Yaskukuni should pay respect to all the dead, Japanese and non-Japanese, good ones, bad ones.
    For Shinto believer, it is what the dead will
    bring about to us rather what will happen to the dead that matters. There is no final judgement after the death: The judgement is for the living beings. And the dead are “living” somehow somewhere near us.
    The deads are gods for them and the gods can be good and bad just as nature can be good and bad. The gods will bring about troubles unless people worship and pray for them just us nature will bring about trouble unless people worship it. The gods will bring about fortune if we keep paying attention to them just as nature will will bring fortune if we keep paying attention to it.

    That is my interpretation of Shinto.

    In one sense the religion is a myth, insinuating how people lived, how people should live, how people should die in the form of the metaphor. To demand a myth to be history seems to be too much.

    Believing in zombie as a savor, believing the miracles happened especially for the specific race is okay though it does not represent the world as it is. To meddle with the faith is “not your business”.

    Japan needs to know its own dark past just as any other country need to know it. But you can not force the specific religion to do that job.

    That is my two cents.

    .

  40. comment number 40 by: tocchin

    Many families of the US soldiers missing in action(MIA) in Vietnam insist that they are still alive somewhere in Vietnam although very few actually believe what they say. That is because the families can recieve the wages until the death is officially confirmed. Yasukuni is also all about money. The politicians who support the bereaved family organization can get votes from the families. The families are the biggest finacial supporter for Yasukuni. In return for their votes, the politicians enabled the childrens of the dead soldiers to receive half of the pensions their mothers used to receive after the mothers death. All the fuss about Yasukuni will die out when the children pass away. Its all about money after all.

  41. comment number 41 by: stannn

    hey egg&ponta,

    I can see that yasukuni is a sensitive issue
    in japan. BTW, I have a simple quesion.
    How many people are supporting the emperor system in japan?(No offense intended)
    Do you think the emperor system the core of japanese national identity?
    If removed, how the japanese identity would be shaped without it?
    Finally, is there any chance that japan will get rid of the emperor system in the near future?

  42. comment number 42 by: ponta

    How many people are supporting the emperor system in japan?(No offense intended)
    Do you think the emperor system the core of japanese national identity?
    If removed, how the japanese identity would be shaped without it?
    Finally, is there any chance that japan will get rid of the emperor system in the near future?

    I am not sure how many. but younger generation are just indifferent to it, and I think most of Japanese are indifferent to it.
    I don’t understand the sentiment of the older
    generation aged over 80 in my impression,. They still respect the emperor from the bottome of their heart.
    My history teacher who was once the elite in the Imperial Japanese Navy was against it, saying Hirohito was responsible for the war.
    I don’t care about the system.
    But notice the emperor has the authority but no power almost throughout the history. It functions quite well when the regime in power change; because there is a “core”, the society is relatively stable in spite of radical change. Meiji restoration was done through it, and MacArthur also used it.
    The national identity is a myth. China needs it because it is such a big country, and Korean need it because it is such an unstable nation. Japan without the emperor system will
    make up another myth, that is all. But no, I
    don’t think Japan will get rid of the emperor
    system in the near future; there is no felt necessary to get rid of it for now. (The one who opposed the emperor system most was communist party, they don’t like authority above their party, they want the revolution. After the class struggle there should be no place for the emperor)

    As for Yasukuni, “let those who want to pray pray” is my opinion. The issue has been used
    politically by the opposition party, especially leftists and then by China and by Korea. But basically it is a matter of religion, I think. Who wants to interfere with religion in another country?

    As for me, I respect the war dead in my own way.

  43. comment number 43 by: egg

    Ponta, thank you for replying me. It may be mind your own business but you sound rather tired about this discussion. I think you have a good reason for being so, as I have read what you wrote at other places too. I feel sorry for bothering you.

    That is my interpretation of Shinto.

    I think I share the same interpretation.

    But you can not force the specific religion to do that job.

    I understand what you are saying. I think you are right.
    I am not against your opinion but when Yasukuni becomes to operate under the government, as foreign minister Aso suggests, (He is saying that it would be better if the Yasukuni voluntarily decide to do that. But I think there is a fear of violating the constitution already, saying like that.) it may not be evitable to change their views about history ( I don`t know much about Arlington cemetery, and I cannot decide whether it is good or not to show our good side of history only.).
    To say further, do you think history during WW2 is part of their myth, doctrine or religion? I have no firm views myself about this so it is just a question.
    If it is and as long as Yasukuni stands as a private shrine, I should agree with you. In that point I will change my views at 36.
    Sorry for pestering you.

  44. comment number 44 by: egg

    stannn, if it nelps you my feelings are below.

    How many people are supporting the emperor system in japan?(No offense intended)

    I don`t know and I can`t tell. We won`t talk about it in daily life. But I am supporting it for several reasons.
    1. I want to keep the tradition.
    2. It has some kind of power in diplomacy.
    3. It has some kind of power to stabilise the country.
    Though I think it is very hard for him to live as a emperor. I thank him for playing the roll.

    Do you think the emperor system the core of japanese national identity?

    When I ask to myself what my national identity is, I would say
    1. Following the daily customs of Japan.
    2. At daily life tring to care about others feelings
    3. Having the feelings of awe against nature
    Those kind of things will come before emperor system but still I think it precious.

    If removed, how the japanese identity would be shaped without it?

    I think the changes we will see is going to be merely
    1.Maybe we have to ellect the president
    2.Our taxes may be slightly cheaper
    But there may be changes that we cannot see. For instance we were hit by a earthquake recently. I saw in the television, the emperor expressing his anxiety to those who suffered. When I saw this I kind of felt, even in difficulties, there is someone who is looking at you. He cannot do anything else but that was a kind of relief to me. The best man to play that roll is not the prime minister but the emperor, I feel.

    Finally, is there any chance that japan will get rid of the emperor system in the near future?

    I don`t feel the sound of “get rid of” nice, and I think there will be little chance. If time comes to abandon the system, I think the reason of the change should be that playing the roll of the emperor is too heavy for a man to do. His human rights are ristricted in many ways. I wouldn`t like to sit in his position.
    I am aware that my thoughts are rather conservative but the above is completly like the words of right winged person. mmm.
    Anyway, if it heips you I would be happy.

  45. comment number 45 by: stannn

    ponta&egg,
    Thanks. I haven’t known how japanese view their emperor. Anyway I didn’t mean to disrespect the japanese emperor. If you feel that way, sorry about that.

  46. comment number 46 by: minami562

    What many posters seem to not understand is the Shinto belief that after death, all sins are supposed to be attoned for and the deceaced become kami. Besides, these ‘criminals’ already paid for their ‘crimes’ with whatever price the Allies asked; their lives.

    If their deaths aren’t enough to satisfy China and Korea’s anger, what is? Are their souls supposed to be punished forever? Do they want to piss on the graves? Do they want to execute the decendants as well?

    That’s just not how Shinto works. They die, they become kami, life goes on.

    If you aren’t satisfied with that, well… you can go fornicate yourself. Don’t tell us Japanese how to practice our religeon. You don’t like our religeon, you don’t like our culture. Just admit that you can’t stand the Japanese, no matter how many times we apologize or how much money we pay.

  47. comment number 47 by: egg

    If their deaths aren’t enough to satisfy China and Korea’s anger, what is? Are their souls supposed to be punished forever? Do they want to piss on the graves? Do they want to execute the decendants as well?

    I am not sure but I think that is their culture. They act like that themselves against each other in their country. May be too much generalization though.

    You don’t like our religeon, you don’t like our culture. Just admit that you can’t stand the Japanese, no matter how many times we apologize or how much money we pay.

    I am begining to think that it may be a cultural conflict at some amount, but even if not I think they will never admit that, because they will lose support from rest of the world.