Occidentalism
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Videos of a squirrel, a balut, & Korean nationalism

September 18th, 2007 . by Gerry-Bevers

A squirrel showing off

Closeups of a Filipino snack, balut

Korean nationalism and an old song of “The Monkees”

 


42 Responses to “Videos of a squirrel, a balut, & Korean nationalism”

  1. comment number 1 by: GarlicBreath

    Oh man that is a funny video. I found this funny video too (familygay, I hope you dont mind if I post this link). Maybe its “lame”.. 🙂

  2. comment number 2 by: HanComplex

    I think the group’s name is “The Monkees” but maybe it doesn’t matter either way. 🙂
    .
    Last video link was the funniest. Any way to make that into a viral video? That and this one should be a good intro to Korean culture:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaKnJ6TWBcM

  3. comment number 3 by: General Tiger

    *After laughing*
    I guess I should start producing some videos aimed at all nations 😛

  4. comment number 4 by: Gerry-Bevers

    You are right, HanComplex. I have corrected the mistake.

    General Tiger,

    I was debating with myself on whether or not to post the link to the Korean nationalism video, but it was too well made not to post.

  5. comment number 5 by: alec931

    you sound like an angry man, Gerry Bevers.

  6. comment number 6 by: alec931

    Just wondering how was this video too well made? a bunch of photos with music on the background. you seem to get very amused with everything anti-Korea, Gerry Bevers.

  7. comment number 7 by: Phil2Musashi

    Regarding the fetal duck breakfast: I think I could probably manage it if it was offered at a friends house or something, but the little half-formed feathers are just too much for me.

  8. comment number 8 by: egg

    I hope that this nationalism shown in the last link stays at the present level and, doesn`t lead to painful results such as those which Japan experienced already. And if it can be helped, I wish we will not get involved, or be the target.
    Though the insults towards my country is quite annoying, still I feel happy if this nationalism stays at the present level of funny… But seeing the pictures that the children have drawn about Dokto(Takeshima), knowing the fact that there are many S.Korean kids thinking that Korean(Chosen) war was fought between S.Korea and Japan, it frightens me. What will happen when they begin to vote? What are the teachers doing? Aren`t there ones who are aware of the danger?

  9. comment number 9 by: General Tiger

    Gerry-Bevers:

    I was debating with myself on whether or not to post the link to the Korean nationalism video, but it was too well made not to post.

    Probably well made in getting the worst out of Korea.
    .
    egg:

    What will happen when they begin to vote? What are the teachers doing? Aren`t there ones who are aware of the danger?

    Not to worry, since there’s this “so-called” iron pot mentality, so people wouldn’t be so “angry” once they get older.
    .
    Believe me, the previous generation were more “anti-Japanese” than the kids of today.

  10. comment number 10 by: Gerry-Bevers

    General Tiger wrote:

    Believe me, the previous generation were more “anti-Japanese” than the kids of today.

    I disagree with that, depending on what generation you are talking about. I have never seen so many anti-Japanese Koreans as I see today.

    I came to Korea in 1982 to study Korean at Yonsei Korean Language Institute. During my first three months in Korea, I stayed for free with a Korean family in Gangnam with the condition that I speak English each day with their high-school-aged son. He was a great kid, and what I remember most about him was that he loved everything Japanese. He would spend all of his allowance on Japanese magazines and was in love with Japanese teen idols. Today that young boy would be about forty-two years old. Is that the generation you think was more anti-Japanese than the young people today?

    I think the anti-Japanese sentiment we see in Korea today was taught in only the last ten years or so, with the really hateful stuff coming in the last five or six years. I think President Roh Mu-hyun is one of those most responsible for poisoning the minds of Korea’s youth because I do not ever remember hearing as many anti-Japanese statements as I have heard in the last few years. It is hard for me to believe that Roh Mu-hyun was once a human rights lawyer.

  11. comment number 11 by: GarlicBreath

    What will happen when they begin to vote? What are the teachers doing? Aren`t there ones who are aware of the danger?

    Coreans will do what ever they can to move to better nations like Japan and the USA. They will continute to have loyalty to Corea. Coreans make very disloyal citizens in Japan and the USA, despite self serving propaganda.
    .
    Jason lim sounds like a north corean mole. I hope homeland security gives him regular lie detector tests.

  12. comment number 12 by: egg

    General Tiger

    Believe me, the previous generation were more “anti-Japanese” than the kids of today.

    What Gerry wrote sounds more persuasive to me, but I hope so, and I will believe you under the reservation that it is based on your personal experience(As you live in S.Korea, your experience must be far more accurate and deep, compared to mine though.). I am not sure but maybe you and Gerry are focusing on different spot, or from some different degree, on S.Korea.
    If what you are saying should be weighed more, our relations might change for the better in the future.
    Well, I will try to keep my hope, though sometimes I can`t help being skeptical…

  13. comment number 13 by: alec931

    gerry,
    .
    “I came to Korea in 1982 to study Korean at Yonsei Korean Language Institute. During my first three months in Korea, I stayed for free with a Korean family in Gangnam with the condition that I speak English each day with their high-school-aged son. He was a great kid, and what I remember most about him was that he loved everything Japanese. He would spend all of his allowance on Japanese magazines and was in love with Japanese teen idols. Today that young boy would be about forty-two years old. Is that the generation you think was more anti-Japanese than the young people today?”
    .
    mmm……so you think the people of that generation are less anti-Japanese….because of that one guy? Your thinking is truly narrowminded.
    .
    btw, if you look hard enough, I’m sure you can find just as much on Japan-loving Koreans as much as you have found on Japan-hating Koreans. But, as they say, ignorance is bliss, eh bevers?
    .
    (btw, just so you know, I don’t like Roh and the Korean left 😉 )

  14. comment number 14 by: GarlicBreath

    Your thinking is truly narrowminded.

    This is great irony, comming from a corean nationalist.

    btw, if you look hard enough, I’m sure you can find just as much on Japan-loving Koreans as much as you have found on Japan-hating Koreans. But, as they say, ignorance is bliss, eh bevers?

    You must be very blissful, because you are very very ignorant lil’al. No matter how hard you look you won’t find 50/50 split of japan lovers/haters in Corea. It seems that corea is still taking orders from china, becasue the rest of asia likes and loves japan.

    Japan
    Japan remains one of the most positively viewed countries worldwide. On average this year, 54 percent gave Japan a positive rating, while just 20 percent said its influence in the world was mainly negative. Out of 27 countries polled, 24 gave Japan a positive rating, with just two giving it a negative and one divided. Among the 19 countries polled in both 2006 and 2007, positive views of Japan slipped slightly by 1 percentage point.

    The two exceptions to this positive reputation for Japan continue to be its neighbours China and South Korea, where majorities rate it quite negatively. Views are somewhat less negative in China compared to a year ago (71% down to 63% negative) and slightly more negative in South Korea (54% to 58% negative).

    While the overall picture remained the same, positive views of Japan increased significantly in Turkey (42% to 51%), France (47% to 55%), Canada (62% to 74%), and Great Britain (57% to 63%); while positive views decreased somewhat in India (48% to 37%) and Brazil (73% to 64%).

    In contrast to China and South Korea, other countries in the Asia/Pacific region have quite positive views of Japan including Indonesians (84%), Filipinos (70%) and Australians (55%). Indians also lean positive (37% positive to 16% negative).

    lil’al… kaakkkkakaka

  15. comment number 15 by: Gerry-Bevers

    This song is dedicated to you, Alec.

    “We are the World”

  16. comment number 16 by: General Tiger

    Gerry:

    I disagree with that, depending on what generation you are talking about. I have never seen so many anti-Japanese Koreans as I see today.

    The generation that you (and I) are talking about is the same generation that is in the Roh Government. It’s just that the internet allows things to spread faster, making it “seem” the current generation is more anti-Japanese.

  17. comment number 17 by: GarlicBreath

    This song is dedicated to you, Alec.

    “We are the World”

    Spot on Mr Bevers, Lil’alec got B-slapped.

    KA-KAKA-KAW

  18. comment number 18 by: GarlicBreath

    It’s just that the internet allows things to spread faster, making it “seem” the current generation is more anti-Japanese.

    Then where are all the pro japanese coreans spreading friendship? Coreans hate the USA and Japan and will push their way to the front of the line to live in those same nations. No not all coreans are backstabbers, but almost all hate the USA and/or Japan.

  19. comment number 19 by: egg

    General Tiger
    Talking about the Dokto(Takeshima) picture incident, do you know whether the teachers who made the kids draw, got warned or punished, for chosing such an inappropriate theme?
    Was it just a scarce, accidental incident, or is it common in your country?
    Were there criticisms against this incident at that time?
    .
    Going off topix again but what do you think about high school kids coming to Japan on a school excursiont and taking photos in front of famous touring spots, holding a banner written “Dokto is our land”? (I can`t read Korean and I am not sure whether the article is trust worthy or not. If I have misunderstood something, please correct me. And I will appologize.)

  20. comment number 20 by: General Tiger

    GarlicBreath:

    Then where are all the pro japanese coreans spreading friendship?

    Buried by the “louder” music of anti-Japanese and anti-Korean sentiments.
    .
    egg:

    Talking about the Dokto(Takeshima) picture incident

    To tell the truth, that’s the only time I’ve seen such a thing in my short life; most of the time, it’s usually something like “Becareful of fire” and such.

    Going off topix again but what do you think about high school kids coming to Japan on a school excursiont and taking photos in front of famous touring spots, holding a banner written “Dokto is our land”?

    My reply: *Facepalm*
    Idiots…. The original purpose was to stop school trips from being just entertainment, but they (the school) got the target wrong -_-

  21. comment number 21 by: GarlicBreath

    Buried by the “louder” music of anti-Japanese and anti-Korean sentiments.

    What “anti-Corean sentiment”? Yes its true that people around asia are learning to despise coreans but that is a separate issue brought on by a backlash of experiencing true corean culture. But that is totally different then Japan. In Japan there is no wide scale anti-Corean education or an anti-corean bias in the Japanese media like the anti-corean media bias in corea.

  22. comment number 22 by: egg

    General Tiger
    I feel sorry if I had embarrassed you.
    If those incidents are just rare accidental cases, (I must admit it is quite annoying but,) I won`t care.
    But I can`t help wondering, “Aren`t these incidents just a tip of the iceberg?” I feel happy if they are not, but I am quite anxious what the teachers are doing in your country.
    Aren`t they pouring all of their enthusiasm to grow hatred against Japan, among the kids?
    Even if not, can I talk or argue calmly with them like I can with you, considering they are taught by such enthusiastic (or one-sided) teachers?
    .
    I am not saying I don`t believe you, but isn`t there a chance that your observations (that anti-Japanese people are decreasing) apply only to (say) highly educated people like (I feel) you are?

  23. comment number 23 by: kjeff

    egg,
    I’m asking you because I think you are sensible person, and I’m really curious how people get the idea of this “widespread” anti-Japanese among Koreans. Do you usually get your info from the internet, or other mediums, such as TV, radio, or literature? I agree with GeneralTiger that anti-Japanese-ism is probably less today than that of the previous generations. The only thing that is different, which may make it seems that it’s more these days, is the internet. Think about it, if I were a hard-core anti-Japanese in the 70s or 80s, what could I do? Aside from hassling the Japanese embassy time to time, there’s probably not much I could do. Now, I can have my own blog, or I were too lazy to do that, I can comment to blog like this one. And since practically there’s no accountability, anyone can say anything…
    .
    (Sorry, going off-topic, but in face-to-face conversation, I’d demand an explanation(with a fist handy otherwise) if I were being called “dishonest,” but in the internet world, one can only hope…)
    .
    Also, with the advent of YouTube, anyone with half a brain, a video-editing software, and an internet connection can publish a video. BTW, have you noticed when you see new anti-Japanese videos, you pretty much see the same old things(including this subway drawings) rehashed, repackaged, again and again. You could probably watch dozens of those videos featuring only half a dozen different incidents. And, as often the case with everything else, it’s not the majority that you heard it’s simply the loudest voice.
    .
    Another point that I want to make is that, when you see these so-called anti-Japanese movement, it usually falls into two categories, Dokdo and the comfort women. Dokdo is really just a territorial dispute, and I would say most Koreans, if not all, believe that it’s their land. But that shouldn’t make them anti-Japanese. Even holding a banner written “Dokto is our land” shouldn’t make them anti-Japanese, it’s simply their opinion, no? I guess the point that I’m trying to make , terms like “anti-Japanese”, or “anti-Korean” for that matter, are thrown around too easily without really thinking what it means. (One regular commenter on this blog however are alarmingly anti-Korean, most are simply misinformed or misguided)
    .

    I am not saying I don`t believe you, but isn`t there a chance that your observations (that anti-Japanese people are decreasing) apply only to (say) highly educated people like (I feel) you are?

    Unlike the popular misconception, Koreans don’t think about Japanese or Japan every single day…and for me, that’s sort of the key ingredient for one to become an anti-Japanese. “Out of sight, out of mind,” is said about love, and the same can be said about hate. The only Koreans that I can think of who are constantly thinking about Japanese/Japan are those who frequented the Japanese version of blog like this, finding out and monitoring every negative aspects, and at times made-up, of Japanese/Japan. I mean, should I think that all, or most, or many, Japanese are anti-Korean from GarlicBreath’s writings? If he’s in fact Japanese…I have a nagging feeling that he’s either a closeted Korean or a wannabe Japanese.

  24. comment number 24 by: General Tiger

    GarlicBreath:

    What “anti-Corean sentiment”? Yes its true that people around asia are learning to despise coreans but that is a separate issue brought on by a backlash of experiencing true corean culture. But that is totally different then Japan. In Japan there is no wide scale anti-Corean education or an anti-corean bias in the Japanese media like the anti-corean media bias in corea.

    1. You seem to think that people “despise only” the Koreans. GO over there and see if they don’t despise the Japanese, Chinese, and Americans. The type of despise you speak of is a common thing that happens when any culture starts going into a country in the masses.
    .
    2. Is there formal anti-Japanese education in Korean Schools? No, there isn’t. Unlike what people like you think, the anti-Japanese sentiment among Koreans is produced from what the society considers about the Japanese, just as an American would hate the illegal Juans coming across the border and such.
    .
    egg Says:

    I feel sorry if I had embarrassed you.
    If those incidents are just rare accidental cases, (I must admit it is quite annoying but,) I won`t care. But I can`t help wondering, “Aren`t these incidents just a tip of the iceberg?” I feel happy if they are not, but I am quite anxious what the teachers are doing in your country.
    Aren`t they pouring all of their enthusiasm to grow hatred against Japan, among the kids? Even if not, can I talk or argue calmly with them like I can with you, considering they are taught by such enthusiastic (or one-sided) teachers?

    As I have said above, there IS no formal anti-Japanese education, unlike what the Nazis taught back in the 1930’s. The overall anti-Japanese “education” is due to what the “386” generation (those that are in Roh’s government, for example) feel about Japan, which gets reflected into the media and such.
    .
    Also, about that exhibition: What people tend to ignore about it is that that was drawn and shown in 2005, when Shimane prefecture designated Takeshima Day, causing the diplomatic chaos. Due to the short-term high interest in Dokdo, the teachers believed that getting the kids interested in the issue would be good, and had them draw what they felt about Japan. In the hightened feelings of the time, the result was the extreme “hatred” shown in the pictures. You can compare it to all the patriotic flag waving that happened in the US in the wake of 9/11

    I am not saying I don`t believe you, but isn`t there a chance that your observations (that anti-Japanese people are decreasing) apply only to (say) highly educated people like (I feel) you are?

    An open minded person like you will probably be able to talk to most Korean calming when meeting face to face. However, given that this is the Internet, I highly doubt that you’ll be able to talk with most people (any nationalities) calmly when it comes to sensitive issues.
    .
    Oh, and don’t consider me “highly educated”: I think that a better word would be “highly aware.”
    .
    kjeff Says:

    If he’s in fact Japanese…I have a nagging feeling that he’s either a closeted Korean or a wannabe Japanese.

    I believe we’re thinking the same thing: Garlic’s use of “C”orea is slightly getting on my nerves

  25. comment number 25 by: egg

    kjeff
    I have noticed your post but I don`t have time to answer it now and maybe this weekend. I will, so please wait for a while. Sorry.

  26. comment number 26 by: General Tiger

    egg:

    I have noticed your post but I don`t have time to answer it now and maybe this weekend. I will, so please wait for a while. Sorry.

    Don’t worry, it’s not like we’re on the net 24 hours a day 😛 just answer at your convinent time.

  27. comment number 27 by: Gerry-Bevers

    I live in Korea, and have lived here for a long time. Koreans never used to come up to me, and, out of the blue, tell me they hate Japan, but now they do, especially little kids. If Japan comes up in conversation, Koreans, in general, feel some sort of obligation to tell you right up front that they do not like (hate) Japan. Where did they learn this hate? On the Internet? I don’t think so. Most probably learned it in school, and from the Korean media. Anyone who says the anti-Japanese feelings in Korea is not serious has his or her head buried in the sand.

  28. comment number 28 by: General Tiger

    Gerry:

    Koreans never used to come up to me, and, out of the blue, tell me they hate Japan, but now they do, especially little kids. If Japan comes up in conversation, Koreans, in general, feel some sort of obligation to tell you right up front that they do not like (hate) Japan. Where did they learn this hate? On the Internet? I don’t think so. Most probably learned it in school, and from the Korean media. Anyone who says the anti-Japanese feelings in Korea is not serious has his or her head buried in the sand.

    It seems we’re dealing in different spheres of society, because seriously, do people come out of the blue to talk about Japan to you? Maybe the people you talk to reflects on what kind of people you deal with (not meant as an insult, Gerry.)
    .
    Also, a question: are you sure that anti-Japanese sentiment are taught in schools? Given that I attended 2 years of elementary school and all of middle/high school, and attending university in Korea, I can certainly say that such an idea of schools indocturing such sentiments into children is unbelieveable.

  29. comment number 29 by: Gerry-Bevers

    How old are you General Tiger? What years were you in school in Korea? Maybe that will explain why you are ignorant of what is going on?

    Numerous times over the last few years, elementary-aged children have come up to me while I am walking home from work or going to or from a store and say, “Hello. I hate Japan (Japanese).” And believe it or not, some have even said, “Fuck Japan.” I wonder where they learned that from?

    South Korean schools used to have plaques in their classrooms that read, “Anti-Japanese, Anti-Communist” (반일반공). Korea’s history books are riddled with anti-Japanese propaganda with little or no explanation of any of the good things Japan did in Korea. The video I posted above (HERE) of of all the hateful pictures drawn by Korean school children was a school project. I did not see any pictures saying anything good about Japan.

    What are school trips to the old Japanese prison in Seoul supposed to teach? In a BBC article HERE, an elderly Korean man makes the following comment:

    “I’ve overcome my hard feelings towards Japan. It’s often the younger people who are more hostile. They’ve been fed only the worst stories about the colonial period but they don’t know the reality the way we do.”

    Pro-Japanese sites have been harrassed and censored in Korea. (See HERE) What do you think would happen if a Korean were to stand up and say, “I think Liancourt Rocks (Dokdo) belongs to Japan”?

    In a 2005 survey, 521 Korean students (See HERE) were asked which country they felt least friendly toward. Here were the results:

    Countries Korean Students Feel Least Friendly To:

    Japan (44.9 %)
    United States (42.8 %)
    China (7.5 %)
    ———————–
    Total: (95.2%)

    Countries Korean Students Feel Closest To:

    Turkey (16.1 %)
    The Netherlands (15.1 %)
    North Korea (13.6 %)
    ———————–
    Total: (44.8 %)

    Can you imagine the results if the US had been excluded from the survey?

    There are other stories, but I do not have time to look for them. Maybe other readers of this blog will do that for us.

  30. comment number 30 by: Ken

    The Chinese are more pissed off by Korean nationalism, racism and irritated at Korean fabriction of history, plagiarism than Japanese people.
    Those who can understand Chinese had better read original sentences of following site.
    http://bbs.enjoykorea.jp/tbbs/read.php?board_id=teconomy&nid=3127394
    It would not be wiser of Koreans to upset the only fellow people.

  31. comment number 31 by: General Tiger

    Gerry-Bevers Says:

    How old are you General Tiger? What years were you in school in Korea? Maybe that will explain why you are ignorant of what is going on?

    20, with 8 years of school in Korea (I lived in the US for about 6 years before that). It seems you’re more ignorant than I am of what’s going on, Gerry.

    Numerous times over the last few years, elementary-aged children have come up to me while I am walking home from work or going to or from a store and say, “Hello. I hate Japan (Japanese).” And believe it or not, some have even said, “Fuck Japan.” I wonder where they learned that from?

    Interesting. What area do you live in?

    South Korean schools used to have plaques in their classrooms that read, “Anti-Japanese, Anti-Communist” (반일반공).

    “Used to?” What time frame are you talking about? The 1980’s?

    Korea’s history books are riddled with anti-Japanese propaganda with little or no explanation of any of the good things Japan did in Korea.

    You mean just regular books, or school textbooks? Because if you’re talking about regular books, you should open your eyes to more books. If you mean textbooks, read them again.

    The video I posted above (HERE) of of all the hateful pictures drawn by Korean school children was a school project. I did not see any pictures saying anything good about Japan.

    I have already addressed that particular issue above. Read it, then come back to me.

    What are school trips to the old Japanese prison in Seoul supposed to teach? In a BBC article HERE, an elderly Korean man makes the following comment:
    “I’ve overcome my hard feelings towards Japan. It’s often the younger people who are more hostile. They’ve been fed only the worst stories about the colonial period but they don’t know the reality the way we do.”

    The trips are supposed to teach the cruel part of the colonial government. Also, by “younger people” in that article, it means the 386 generation, the same generation that you taught in the 1980’s and the generation that is in Roh’s government.

    Pro-Japanese sites have been harrassed and censored in Korea. (See HERE)

    I’ve been to those sites before they were blocked (as I have said some time ago), and they weren’t just “Pro”-Japanese: they were the same type of sites like Stormfront, piece of trash that will be regulated in most countries. Think again before attempting to think that censored sites are censored because they were “Pro-Japanese.”

    In a 2005 survey, 521 Korean students (See HERE) were asked which country they felt least friendly toward. Can you imagine the results if the US had been excluded from the survey?

    Yes, I can imagine the results, with China getting its fair share of anti sentiments. Also, if you think that South Chungcheong represents all of Korea, you should reconsider your logic.

    There are other stories, but I do not have time to look for them. Maybe other readers of this blog will do that for us.

    Maybe you should consider looking over your examples first before asking for more. Also, get some fresh examples, for Heaven’s sake: you’re using the same examples that has already been torn to pieces. Recycling is good, but there’s a limit to it.
    .
    Ken:

    The Chinese are more pissed off by Korean nationalism, racism and irritated at Korean fabriction of history, plagiarism than Japanese people.
    Those who can understand Chinese had better read original sentences of following site.
    http://bbs.enjoykorea.jp/tbbs/read.php?board_id=teconomy&nid=3127394
    It would not be wiser of Koreans to upset the only fellow people.

    Of course they are more pissed off, since we contradict their Sino-Centric views.

  32. comment number 32 by: Ken

    Result of Koreans opinion poll
    The most hated country : Top is Japan at 38%.
    Beloved counry : Top is the USA and the 2nd is Australia.
    This is good tendency as they will not choose Japan but the USA or Australia to immigrant at upcoming bankruptcy.
    http://japanese.joins.com/article/article.php?aid=91404
    The country to model after : Top is Japan at 27%.
    Japan is not supposed wanting to be imitated, though.

  33. comment number 33 by: alec931

    gorl,
    .
    “It seems that corea is still taking orders from china, becasue the rest of asia likes and loves japan.”
    .
    What does this have anything to do with the topic? Please stay on topic.
    .
    And sorry, the link you posted doesn’t exist. Please go back to your sandbox, unloved child.

  34. comment number 34 by: alec931

    gerry,
    .
    Thank you for posting the video. Unfortunately, this still doesn’t change my view that you are a bored, narrowminded individual with a bitter resent for Korea that stems from your loneliness. Nor does it prove any of your ridiculous claims. If you accept your views about anti-Japanese sentiment in Korea as fact based on one person you lived with for 3 months, a few kids that for some reason go out of their way to express their hate for Japan to you (why do I have a hard time believing this?), and a survey of 521 STUDENTS (which seems to be sanctioned by a notoriously left wing organization, no less), then you need to get your head examined.
    .
    Anyway, I dedicate this site to you, gerry: http://www.lavalife.com/

  35. comment number 35 by: General Tiger

    alec931:

    Anyway, I dedicate this site to you, gerry: http://www.lavalife.com/

    You’re no better than your opinion of Gerry with posts like that.

  36. comment number 36 by: alec931

    General Tiger,
    .
    “You’re no better than your opinion of Gerry with posts like that.”
    .
    You can think whatever you want, but although I don’t hold gerry to the highest regard, I never claimed my mud slinging was better than his, did I? (I just prefer mine over his 😉 )
    But, if you saw the link I posted in an earlier post, you would get the idea why gerry is so bitter.
    .
    Anyway, be objective as much as you want, but why do I get the feeling you snickered when you read my comment? 😉

  37. comment number 37 by: General Tiger

    alec931:

    Anyway, be objective as much as you want, but why do I get the feeling you snickered when you read my comment?

    Actually, I rolled my eyes, because it’s such a low blow.

  38. comment number 38 by: alec931

    General Tiger: “Actually, I rolled my eyes, because it’s such a low blow. ”
    .
    I’m not the one who’s bitching about being lonely and wanting to not be alone. I’m simply providing a potential solution, which is certainly better than bitching about D-wars or anything Korean for that matter. Where’s the beef?
    .
    btw, I still stand by my comment.

  39. comment number 39 by: Matt

    btw, I still stand by my comment.

    It is pointless speculation unless you actually know the person. Just because someone holds an opinion that you find to be dull, incorrect, stupid, or pedantic, does not mean he is not getting laid.

    The only time you can make a good guess about someone not getting laid is when they are complaining about other people “stealing” all the women, because it is directly related.

  40. comment number 40 by: alec931

    Matt: “It is pointless speculation unless you actually know the person.”
    .
    You are entitled to your own opinions and thoughts……….as I am, “Mr Matt” 😉
    .
    Matt: “Just because someone holds an opinion….”
    .
    Whoa…….My comments weren’t necessarily in response to his “dull, incorrect, stupid, or pedantic” opinions….although I do believe his ranting ABOUT stupid things is related to the things that gerry himself expressed in the link in question. But, to each his/her own, right?
    .
    Matt: “The ***only*** time you can make a good guess about someone not getting laid is when they are complaining about other people “stealing” all the women, because it is directly related.” (Emphasis mine)
    .
    Again, you are entitled to your own opinions and thoughts. I have already expressed mine.
    .
    Anyway, I’m curious as to what made you tone down on the anti-Korean/Whatever that doesn’t float your boat posts (even your recent post on those Korean d!ckheads in Australia seem softer than your posts from before)…….the same may work on bevers…….just a thought.

  41. comment number 41 by: egg

    kjeff
    Sorry for being late. I was rather busy last weekend and to make matters worse, I have caught a cold and had rather hard times.
    Anyway, I would like to explain what I am thinking and answer your questions in the following order.

    1.What I think to be the probrem when I use the word Anti-Japan.
    2.My beliefs about the anti-Japanese tendency in S.Korea.
    3.Why I think like the above.
    4.My objections against your claim.

    1.What I think to be the probrem when I use the word Anti-Japan.

    First, considering your words,
    “I would say most Koreans, if not all, believe that it’s their land. But that shouldn’t make them anti-Japanese. Even holding a banner written “Dokto is our land” shouldn’t make them anti-Japanese, it’s simply their opinion, no?”
    I admit I might have used an inappropriate word to descrive the probrem.
    What I am anxious about S.Korean society is, observing from outside, the people in S.Korea seem to have a tendency to ignore others claim without examining it. In the S.Korean newspapers (Sorry, it is in Japanese, I couldn`t find the English version.) you can see words like “妄言”(imprudent remarks), “捏造”(fablication) often, but you can`t find out the reason why they think so in the article even in the Japanese version. They seem to try to deny others arguments without explaining their position or why they think so.
    Instead of using the words anti-Japan, maybe I should have used the word arrogance or Korea-centric. I feel these attitudes mainly apear against isuues which are related to Japan (sometimes China) so I guess I have mixed them up unconciuosly. It is not that I don`t feel anti-Japanese tendency in a narrow meaning (that is to deny or object everything Japan does for the only reason that Japan did it), but about this banner case it was not appropiate.
    Now answering your question directly which I quoted above, of course the children have the freedom of speach. Leagaly there is absolutly no probrem in the kids holding the banner. And I agree that will not mean that they are anti-Japanese in a narrow meaning. But at the same time are their actions constructive? If they are attending to a discussion about Dokto(Takeshima) issue with Japanese kids, and explaining their position, I will say nothing. That will mean that the S.Korean children are trying to listen and understand the Japanese position and to explain S.Korean position about the matter. It will lead to better understandings and relationships. But their action is not. It will only bring contempt from Japanese people, I guess. They seem to show the same tendency which I feel to exist in S.Korean society (my observations are only from S.Korean papers so, I am not yet making it my final conclusion), to deny others claim and to declare theirs without reasoning. And I feel that is a probrem.

    2.My beliefs about the anti-Japanese tendency in S.Korea

    I believe there is, both arrogance, S.Korea centric views and the narrow meaning of anti-Japanese tendency. I can`t judge whether it has become stronger, compared from the past, but at least I am fearing that it might get stronger in the future.

    3.Why I think like the above

    Since you have asked me ” I’m really curious how people get the idea of this “widespread” anti-Japanese among Koreans. Do you usually get your info from the internet, or other mediums, such as TV, radio, or literature?”, answering your question might be better to explain my ideas.
    I get the informations about S.Korea firstly from the net, secondly from Japanese papers (about political and economical issues) and thirdly from Japanese TV programs. The ratio will be perhaps 9:0.9:0.1 .
    About the net, I want to make it clear that I am not making my decisions from rumors. What I am taking care of is that the original source can be trased to S.Korean papers and such.
    Some examples which I consider to show Korea-centric views or Anti-Japanese sentiment in the S.Korean society.
    http://english.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200504/200504080018.html
    http://english.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200708/200708140006.html
    http://news.naver.com/news/read.php?mode=LSD&office_id=009&article_id=0000597020(A korean actor? criticized for painting a Japanese flag like mark on his bike)
    About the last article I have read it through a translation of Japanese so there may be mistakes. By the way, I can`t understand the representatives treading on other country`s flag if there were no anti-Japan tendency in the society.

    4.My objections against your claim

    I understood your position to be,
    1.There is no or little anti-Japanese sentiment in S.Korea.
    2.It looks as though if there is because of the net.
    About No.1, I cannot share your view. The reason is shown directly above.
    About No.2, I admit that there might be a chance that the net might be exaggerating the anti-Japanese sentiment. But what I feel curious is, the ones who are against anti-Japanese tendency can easily counter-argue the YouTube video too, but there seems to be none. Sending one`s message has become easy both for anti-Japanese people and for pro-Japanese people. (Same with anti-Korean people and pro-Korean people.) Why aren`t there people who are counter-arguing the videos? For example, about the Dokto pictures of kids, you can telephone the school master, what kind of warnings did the teacher get and so on, and you can make the conversation into a video.
    Before mentioning about the power of the net, what kind of results came out to the people who were involveded in the matter, will be a more important and essential objection. And I feel those are needed to decrease the idea of the “widespread” anti-Japanese among Koreans.(If it is wrong as you claim.)

    Sorry for writing long, I guess there are many points where you can`t take my meanings or where I haven`t answered your question properly. I am willing to answer your further questions. Thank you.

  42. comment number 42 by: egg

    General Tiger
    Sorry for my late reply.

    The overall anti-Japanese “education” is due to what the “386” generation (those that are in Roh’s government, for example) feel about Japan, which gets reflected into the media and such.

    If it is official, you can change it by changing the orders or laws. But if it comes from teachers feelings, I can`t figure out how it could be improved, without firing them (which would be almost impossible). In a way, your suggestion is a little frightening to me. It will continue till the teachers change their views…
    I guess that you are intending to mention about some teachers who are suspected to have taught anti-Japanese things, and not about the S.Korean education in general.

    Also, about that exhibition: What people tend to ignore about it is that that was drawn and shown in 2005, when Shimane prefecture designated Takeshima Day, causing the diplomatic chaos. Due to the short-term high interest in Dokdo, the teachers believed that getting the kids interested in the issue would be good, and had them draw what they felt about Japan. In the hightened feelings of the time, the result was the extreme “hatred” shown in the pictures.

    It was the same for us, but I never heard of a similar exhibition taking place in Japan.
    .
    By the way, do you know why (I mean the backgrounds.) Shimane prefecture designated Dokto(Takeshima) Day?