Occidentalism
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Subtitled videos about Korea

February 26th, 2007 . by Matt

JapanProbe made a great find with these English subtitled Japanese videos about Korea and its relations with other countries. Some of them I have posted before, but without the English Subtitles.

South Korean Anti Japanese Education

Colonial period and comfort women

Takeshima/Dokdo

Korean historical perceptions VS China


31 Responses to “Subtitled videos about Korea”

  1. comment number 1 by: HanComplex

    Great find by JP. Is it any wonder why they’re so brainwashed with anti-Japan sentiment–indoctrination starts at a young age. My favorite part was when the kids were asked what they thought of Lil’ Kim: “He’s a good man.” ROFL!!

    Ah yes, of course Confucius was Korean and so are Chinese characters. We all know this to be true because Samurai, Kendo, Sakura, etc. are also all Korean. Yes. There can be no doubt.

  2. comment number 2 by: mitaker

    The translations aren’t very good. They get the general gist of what is being said correctly, but a lot of the details are incorrect, making it very painful for the native speaker to watch. Many times, they translate in favor of the Japanese or against the Koreans. Exaggerating the points is not going to help get the message across better. It’s only going to make the translations lose credibility.

  3. comment number 3 by: pacifist

    Although the translation is not completely right, such information for English speaking (English reading) people is useful to make the world understand the problem of Korean education system.
    I suspect the teachers’ union 全教組 is a tool of North Korea. If the unification of NK and SK under the leadership of this kind of group, the whole Korean system should be Kim Dynasty, which resembles the Yi Dynasty.

  4. comment number 4 by: nighthawk

    mitaker,

    That’s a shame. It would be great if more Korean native speakers like you could help improve the translations so that people in the world would get a better sense of the anti-Japan education in Korea.

  5. comment number 5 by: Phil2Musashi

    Scary.

    I can only imagine how embarressing this stuff will be for Korea and Koreans in the future.

    How long until they appropriating American treasures, such as The Constitution, Statue of Liberty, and Clint Eastwood?

  6. comment number 6 by: Gerry-Bevers

    There was a mistake made in the Takeshima/Dokdo video. I think the Japanese producers wanted to show how the Dokdo Museum had switched the locations of Ulleungdo and Usando on a map in their museum, but they compared the wrong maps in the video.

    The maps in the video were two separate. legitimate maps that just happened to show Uleungdo and Usando is reversed positions. Neither was the problem map, which does exist at the museum. In fact, it has been shown and discussed here at Occidentalism.

    I think the Japanese producers of the video had heard that there was a problem map at the museum and mistakenly assumed that because the islands were reversed on the two maps, one was the problem map.

  7. comment number 7 by: pacifist

    Gerry,

    I thought that they only intended to show the incosistency in the location of the same island (Usando), sometimes west of Ulleungdo and sometimes east of Ulleungdo.

  8. comment number 8 by: Gerry-Bevers

    Pacifist,

    Maybe that is what the video of the two maps was trying to show, but the man who came on after the two maps said the following:

    “Is there any other name for this besides historical fraud?”

    There was no “historical fraud” involved with the two maps shown on the video, if they are what the man was referring to. However, there is a display at the museum that misrepresents an old Korean map by switching the positions of the two islands. I think that is the map he was thinking about when he referred to “historical fraud.”

  9. comment number 9 by: fruitbonbon

    A couple of people said the translation is not right. I wonder if anybody can make it better.

  10. comment number 10 by: Kaneganese

    Gerry,
    Yes Mr.Aoyama was reffering to the display at Dokdo museum in Ulleundo not the maps in the video (apperently, he was interviewed in other place, not in the studio). The display of 八道総図 map made of plaster in the museum is freud, but I don’t think the old Korean maps in the video are not freud at all. The program maker simply wanted to show the Usando moved to east in latermaps, but when you air together, it is confusing and misleading.

  11. comment number 11 by: pacifist

    Gerry,
    .
    I saw the video once again.
    As Kaneganese wrote, Mr. Aoyama was giving a comment after the scene of the maps illustrating the movement of Usando.
    .
    He actually said that “historical falsification” (歴史の改ざん), maybe talking about Korean insistence about Takeshima/Dokdo referring to the Korean claim about Japanese textbooks.
    .
    I suppose that he wanted to say, “They were using this uncertain record of moving island to insist the ownership of Takeshima/Dokdo, it is a historical falsification.”

  12. comment number 12 by: Paul89

    if it werent for dokto and other problems those communists in south korea wouldnt have an excuse to stir up things.

    I am for unification with north korea, but in the future and without kim jong il and the communists.

    anti-us and anti-japan sentiments are a big problem in south korea but japan isnt helping the situation either.

  13. comment number 13 by: pacifist

    I’m not so optimistic about the unification of NK and SK because China won’t let their son go without any crops. China thinks all the Korean peninsula is their territory.

  14. comment number 14 by: Kaneganese

    Paul89, how do you think Japan can help Korea?

  15. comment number 15 by: dynamica

    Anyone who has ever spent any amount of time in South Korea knows that Koreans are extremely discriminating and racist towards the Japanese. This Dokdo issue only gave them yet another avenue to justify their hate for the Japanese.

    I was living in Seoul at the time, and I clearly remember taking the sidetrip to see these posters first hand…yes, they were real!

    The South Korean education system is severely flawed, yet no one at the education offices know how to fix the problem…nor really care to be bothered with the repairs. Basically, whatever the teacher says is law and truth…so if the teacher says “Hate Japan,” the students do as they are told. I am not sure how to word it but it is sort of like one mind brainwashing the masses…sort of like Kim Jung Il in the North does.

    We should also not forget, children are not born with hate…it is something thrust upon them.

    Such hatred is only the tip of the iceberg….how many times have I witnessed South Koreans discriminate against ‘outsiders’…too many times. Koreans are known to be extremely xenophobic and have a grand misunderstanding of other cultures and people. Korea may have been a Hermit Kingdom in the past, but such obvious examples like these posters will do nothing but push South Korea to the sidelines in today’s world of understanding and tolerance.

  16. comment number 16 by: crypticlife

    The violence of some of these saddens me. I mean, even if I were convinced Japan was filled with racist lying xenophobes I wouldn’t wish the nation to sink, dooming millions of children (even racist lying xenophobe children). Nor would I wish it on fire, or to be blown up with nuclear technology.

    Nor do I think it necessarily represents a majority view in SK (it may or may not, AFAIK) — but that a wall of children’s posters could be found which includes so much of this sentiment suggests it’s prevalent opinion, even if it’s not a majority one.

  17. comment number 17 by: MarkA

    Ethnic Coreans are still pimping their own blood in China today.
    Comfort women…the self-inflicted wound of Corea.

  18. comment number 18 by: oniazuma

    Wow i followed the link thing off my youtube page didnt think so many people would be interested in this. Anyways, Hi i’m oniazuma I posted this video subscribe to my youtube profile for more i should be posting.

  19. comment number 19 by: Matt

    Wow i followed the link thing off my youtube page didnt think so many people would be interested in this. Anyways, Hi i’m oniazuma I posted this video subscribe to my youtube profile for more i should be posting.

    Good job, oniazuma.

  20. comment number 20 by: kjeff

    Ethnic Coreans are still pimping their own blood in China today.
    Comfort women…the self-inflicted wound of Corea.

    Wow, I’ve never thought of it that way… What an original argument… Brilliant…Clap everyone…LOL

  21. comment number 21 by: ponta

    I’ve never thought of it that way… What an original argument… Brilliant…Clap everyone

    Maybe it needs to be condemed by the US resolution?. It is not only in China, but also in Korea that modern Korean comfort women are suffering.

  22. comment number 22 by: kjeff

    It is not only in China, but also in Korea that modern Korean comfort women are suffering.

    Wow, I applaud your efforts to equate systemized sexual slavery with modern day prostitution. Let’s not forget that Korea had prostitutes before and after Japan’s rule. That 12 year-old ‘comfort girl’, she wanted to be one, and there were thousands like her. If they didn’t want to, they could have just said no. No, Japanese didn’t threaten them, well, not all of them. Really, if they didn’t want to, they could have just starved to death. Hey, I heard it’s a great way to go with all that endorphin getting you high.
    That poor 1 million strong sex workers in Korea right now. They got what? 4.4% of GDP, billions of billions dollar.(Fuzzy math if you ask me, but hey…) Let’s do some calculation: 1M/48M = roughly 2%. What? Did I count that right? 2% of population making 4% of GDP. Arghh, they only making twice per capita income. No wonder those “comfort women” are suffering.
    하하하…히히히…호호호…

  23. comment number 23 by: Matt

    That 12 year-old ‘comfort girl’, she wanted to be one, and there were thousands like her. If they didn’t want to, they could have just said no. No, Japanese didn’t threaten them, well, not all of them. Really, if they didn’t want to, they could have just starved to death. Hey, I heard it’s a great way to go with all that endorphin getting you high.

    kjeff, where were the 12 year old comfort women? Do you think 여자 정신대 = comfort woman?

  24. comment number 24 by: GarlicBreath

    Kjeff, if you like the idea of 12 year old hookers, you are sick in the head.

  25. comment number 25 by: kjeff

    Matt,

    Do you think 여자 정신대 = comfort woman?

    I don’t know what you mean.

    GarlicBreath,

    Well, read again…

  26. comment number 26 by: ponta

    , I applaud your efforts to equate systemized sexual slavery with modern day prostitution.

    Do you think so?

    There are two types of kijich’on prostitutes, the registered and the unregistered, or so-called streetwalkers…..In order to work in the clubs, a woman must go to the local police station to register her name and address and the name of the club where she will be working. She must also go to the local VD clinic, undergo gynecological and blood examinations and receive a VD card. To maintain her status as a”healthy” hostess, she must go once a week for VD examination and get her card stamped”healthy” by the clinic;”healthy” means she is free of VD infection

    Once in the club, the woman’s life revolves around the schedule of the local GIs and the business demands of the club owner or manager, who serves as her pimp.

    Selling drinks, however, has never been the mainstay of the women’s earnings: Women are expected to sleep with GIs for the bulk of their income

    American Town is a camptown developed with the collusion of both the Korean and American governments. Built by a South Korean general and landowner in 1969 during the height of the Park Chung Hee regime

    ttp://kalaniosullivan.com/KunsanAB/8thFW/Howitwasb11d6.html#Prostitution

    in the 1970s the Korean government was also engaged in the surveillance and authoritarian control of the prostitutes servicing the US military. At the request of the latter that complained of the unhealthy conditions of the kijich’on sex industry, the Korean government started a clean-up campaign in 1971 that included infrastructural improvements and enforcement of regular medical examinations of prostitutes

    ttp://www.icasinc.org/2000/2000s/2000scss.html
    Japanese troop also licenced comfort station
    run by private citizens Koreans included, and carried out VD test. And there were unlicensed brothels.

    Are the bar girls contracts fair and legal? YES AND NO!!!

    The contracts are legal and binding under Korean law

    ttp://kalaniosullivan.com/KunsanAB/8thFW/Howitwasb11d6.html#Questions
    Contract bound comfort women under Japanese
    rule.

    people coerced into prostitution was apparently not uncommon up until the 1980s. The movie ‘Chang’ starring the main actress in “My Wife is a Gangster” depicted this kind of thing. It’s worth seeing

    Kushibo at Asian pages

    The employment agencies usually lure young women into working at room salons and coffee shops (in Korean, ‘dabang’). The women agree to the job, after having been told the work will require simply pouring drinks or delivering coffee to offices. While the women think they’re simply being hired, the employment agencies are selling them to the room salons and ‘dabang’ for sums well over $10,000 a head.

    As for loan sharks, women who fail to pay off debts in the required amount of time (usually quite short) are sold off to the likes of room salons and ‘dabang.

    Ming at Asian pages.

    Many comfort women under Japanese rule were reported to be deceived. And comfort women were pressured into brothel out of poverty.
    ttp://www.newstown.co.kr/newsbuilder/service/article/mess_column.asp?P_Index=41690
    Some women reported they were forced.

    And, in the early 80’s when I first got to Korea, about half the girls in the clubs were sold by their loving parents into servitude so mom and dad could live well. The girls were stuck in the clubs/on their backs until the agreed amount was paid off

    ttp://www.rjkoehler.com/2006/07/07/at-least-5000-korean-prostitutes-in-usa-cal-state-professor/#comment-42696
    ShiGye at marmot
    Many comfort woman under Japanese rule were said to be sold by their parents.

    Korean sex industry thrives despite—or because of—Special Law

    ttp://www.rjkoehler.com/?p=2774

    Illegal pimps were active despite the regulations Japanese troop imposed.

    And there is no evidence that Japan government systematically forcibly mobilized Korean women into brothel.
    ttp://www.ohmynews.com/ArticleView/article_view.asp?at_code=377687

    Arghh, they only making twice per capita income. No wonder those “comfort women” are suffering

    So you approve of Korean comfort women because they have higher income?
    Comfort women under Japanese rule were paid much more than average soldiers.(A comfort
    women filed the suit in Japan to return the enoumous money she earned, but some others says more than 50 years later, they didn’t recieve any money. Brothels took it)

    As a side note, here is the US report in 1944 on the comfort women
    ttp://www.exordio.com/1939-1945/codex/Documentos/report-49-USA-orig.html
    And here is what Korea scholar has to say about testimony of Korean comfort women more than 50 years later.

    This book was begun in March 1992, when members of the society began speaking to about 40 former comfort women who had given their addresses and had indicated a willingness to be contacted. In the processor recording testimonies, the number of women we decided to include here was narrowed down to 19. We eliminated those who were reluctant to talk about the details of their experiences, those whose stories contained inconsistencies and those who contradicted themselves. The surviving comfort women are now quite old, and have lived through so much adversity that many can faintly remember the sufferings they endured. To help them remember their experiences more clearly, all the researchers compared the details of the accounts with what we know about the military history of Japan through documents .

    ttp://www.amazon.com/gp/product/030433264X/103-1096385-2718212?v=glance&n=283155

  27. comment number 27 by: kjeff

    Ponta,

    As usual, I can always count on your elaborative comments. Frankly, I’m overwhelmed by your knowledge. To me personally(I’m not an expert in history or contract law or anything), all the discussion about the similarity between during and after the occupation is moot. During, I view those, regardless of circumstance, as at the very least comparable to statutory rape. You are the colonial power, such that any such sexual activity is assumed to be coercive since the colony subject is as unable to give consent to the acts. After, they were just your garden variety criminal activities. “With power comes responsibilities” Spidey’s uncle?
    .
    “contained inconsistencies” and “faintly remember”, if these are what you rely your defence on, well… you’ll never understand.
    .
    I read your posting again, and it sort of remind of those episodes of ‘Law and Order’ when the rich defense lawyers bombarded the prosecutor office with motions after motions to keep them busy…At the risk of sounding unappreciative of your works, could you tell me, in a few sentences, what you’re trying to say?

  28. comment number 28 by: hardyandtiny

    “if it werent for dokto and other problems those communists in south korea wouldnt have an excuse to stir up things.”

    Waaad?! Then how do arguments exist?

  29. comment number 29 by: ponta

    Kjeff
    Thanks

    I view those, regardless of circumstance, as at the very least comparable to statutory rape

    So Do you say Korean prostitutes who had little choice but to be prostitutes raped everyday in Korea? And you ignore it because they contribute to GDP?

    You are the colonial power, such that any such sexual activity is assumed to be coercive since the colony subject is as unable to give consent to the acts. After, they were just your garden variety criminal activities.

    Not really.
    there were many Korean governors, policemen, Korean pimps, Korean soldiers .
    It is not colonized=Japanese vs Korean women, but in my opinion it is rather men vs women or have vs have not.

    At the risk of sounding unappreciative of your works, could you tell me, in a few sentences, what you’re trying to say?

    Study history. Examine evidences carefully.
    Be self-critical/reflective. If this is too long, just don’t be afraid
    of doubting Korean nationalistic assumption.
    Is that too long too?

  30. comment number 30 by: empraptor

    I started the first video posted and found the following translation mistakes.

    Writings on the pictures. I don’t know whether the translation went bad from Korean to Japanese or Japanese to English.

    The first picture shown of a person shooting another with the machine gun should read “I will kill all…” (I assume it says “Japanese” where the Japanese caption was placed) rather than “Let us kill all Japanese”.

    The second picture of Japan in flames reads “Would you like things to turn out this way?” rather than “Lets turn the Japanese islands into an ocean of fire”.

    Wouldn’t know if translation of spoken Korean went bad as they are dubbed and can’t make out the speech.

  31. comment number 31 by: oniazuma

    30 empramptor>>>
    Are you reading the korean written on the signs? The Japanese to English is how it should be.
    2 mitaker>>>
    where?