Occidentalism
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Teaching History in Korean schools…

June 18th, 2005 . by Matt

Gord has attracted a lot of interest with his pictures of Korean elementary school kid hate (One hundred and twenty thousand hits). No doubt the kids were whipped into a frenzy by their parents and teachers. Here are some samples from Gords site. The pics are supposed to support Korea’s unlikely claim to an Island called Takeshima (Dokto in Korean) in the Sea of Japan, which is currently under military occupation by Korea, and contested by Japan.

gangbeat
“Who does it belong to?”

liar
“Japanese are liars”

stomping
“Dokto belongs to Korea!”

As usual, Gord is insulted by a bunch of Koreans and ethnic ‘Korean Americans’ (the usual suspects) that came out calling Gord a racist for posting the pics. Gord delivers a righteous beatdown that is worth reading.


7 Responses to “Teaching History in Korean schools…”

  1. comment number 1 by: mashimaro

    good first post.. they start the xenophobia young in korea thats for sure.
    no wonder it’s so hard to break them out of it. congrats on the new site dude

  2. comment number 2 by: randomcow

    Dude, these pictures are crazy!

    I showed the pictures to a Japanese person to see what they thought. I think most Japanese are like the bully when it comes to this – they’re like “oh that? I’d forgotten about that,” and they don’t really care about it. They’ve long forgotten about it. Wheras the Koreans are like the kid who got bullied – they’re not going to forget that they got bullied for as long as they live.

    Does Korean society have institutionalised bullying like Japanese society? If so then they should know that the Koreans should be taking some of the blame for being “bullied” over the centuries.

    RC

  3. comment number 3 by: RGM-79

    Korean society does have institutionalised bullying.
    Especially against foreigners and handicapped people.

    In fact, Japanese children in overseas are oftenly bullied or assaulted by Korean children in the schools and it’s becoming a local social problem.
    That’s what heard from my friend who lives in Canada.

  4. comment number 4 by: quansh

    We should pay attention to Koreans and their leftwing diet which is close to North Korea and China. Korean government diverts her people away from their complaint against her by telling the historical matters over and over again. It is dangerous for the Western countries as well as Japan.

  5. comment number 5 by: Matt

    We should pay attention to Koreans and their leftwing diet which is close to North Korea and China. Korean government diverts her people away from their complaint against her by telling the historical matters over and over again. It is dangerous for the Western countries as well as Japan.

    I think that Korea will become the servant of China again. Korea was following Chinese ways for 1000 years, and in the future will probably follow China for 1000 more. If North and South Korea are united, they will be allies of China, not of the U.S., I think.


  6. […] I dont want to be negative, but is not the result of this kind of ‘education’ going to be a repeat of this kind of thing? Posted by Matt Filed in Racist Industrial Complex, diplomacy […]


  7. […] The recurrent themes of Occidentalism (the site started about a year ago, here’s the first post) in a nutshell seem to be a) Koreans are still to this day using fake, doctored atrocity photos to drum up anti-Japanese hatred (see posts here, here and here); b) the whole issue of “comfort women” has been vastly inflated or distorted (no specific posts but see the end of this post plus various comments littered throughout the site); c) Koreans were not forced to serve in the Japan Imperial Army or as workers for Japan’s industrial giants, but rather volunteered (here and again in various comments); and d) that Japan’s occupation of Korea was not nearly as brutal as Koreans today make it out to be, that such policies as forcing Koreans to adopt Japanese names or banning Hangul didn’t happen, and that the developed South Korea of today owes a big debt to the colonization of Korea by Japan (see here, here, and here). […]