Occidentalism
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The Korea Society: For “Greater Awareness” or Propaganda?

September 25th, 2006 . by Gerry-Bevers

On its Web page here, The Korea Society describes its organization as follows:

The Korea Society is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan, 501(c)(3) organization with individual and corporate members that is dedicated solely to the promotion of greater awareness, understanding and cooperation between the people of the United States and Korea….

That description may be the goals of the The Korea Society, but that does not mean that those goals are always achieved or are even desired in certain situations. For example, I wonder if The Korea Society is really interested in promoting “greater awareness” when it comes to “Dokdo” (Liancourt Rocks). I am curious because I notice on its Web site here that one of the recipients of its 2005 scholarship was a man named Steve Barber from Scottsdale, Arizona.

If the Steve Barber who received The Korea Society scholarship is the same Steve Barber who wrote this letter and who has been posting as Wedgie, and possibly other names, on this blog and others, then I fear that the goals of the society are not being achieved when it comes to the issue of “Dokdo.”

I believe that Steve Barber’s goal is leaning more toward promoting Korean propaganda on “Dokdo” than toward promoting “greater awareness.” I do not know if he is is working alone or if he has the support of The Korea Society, but if he is “Wedgie,” then I think he was a poor choice for the organization’s 2005 scholarship.

And what is really disturbing is that it looks like Steve Barber (Wedgie) may be a high school teacher:

“Can we talk the talk?”


67 Responses to “The Korea Society: For “Greater Awareness” or Propaganda?”

  1. comment number 1 by: pacifist

    YoungRocco,

    What about the Samjeondo Monument and the Yeongeunmun Gate? Did you study yourself and learn that Korea was a tributary to China (Min and Qing) for 500 years?

  2. comment number 2 by: pacifist

    YoungRocco,

    You are still in the brainwahed state by Korean government.
    After the liberation of Korea from China (after the Sino-Japanese war), Japan wanted Korea to be independent, as Hirobumi Ito intended, but Korea had no such ability as you can see in many texts I showed you.

    There were great Koreans who thought Korea should be independent but their will was trampled by concervative faction in Korea. It’s a pity that Korea couldn’t stand alone but this was a fact.

    They should choose the way whether they let Russia or some other big power occupy the peninsula after the collapse, or annexed by Japan. And they chose the latter.

    I recommend you to read the letter by 李完用. Then you will understand the situation of Korea in those days.

    BTW, I don’t mind about ages of you and I – though I know Korean people always worry about ages, but I think I am older than you, YoungRocco.

  3. comment number 3 by: GarlicBreath

    How old are you Miss Young R?

  4. comment number 4 by: ponta

    My claim was that coercion was used to enforce the treaty.

    Japan-Korea Annexation Treaty
    01AccountingSupport.com
    We Support Intl SMEs in Tokyo Bilingual Accountant & Tax Solution
    http://www.01AccountingSupport.com
    Wikipedia

    Oh my it is from your favorite wiki.

    In his last testament in 1926, Emperor Yung-hui affirmed that the treaty was forced through by ministers threatened and bribed by the Japanese.

    Looks like Koreans have not changed a bit. They take no responsibility for what they have done. Anyway you forget the fact the king authorized Lee wan yon link

    Emperor Yong Hui did not sign the proclamation himself, and in his last statement, written at a time when he was not subject to coercion or threats of violence, he stated that the treaty was coerced.

    That is the most unfair, timid thing King can do as King..
    Japanese emperor said, “you can kill me but save our nation” when he met MacArthur.

    1. The king’s signature is required to make the law formal.
    2. The treaty does not have the king’s signature, therefore it is illegal.

    What’s “therefore” functioning for?
    The treaty without king’s signature is valid in veiw of international law.
    You have to prove the king was forced as he shamelessly claimed. There is a signature by him. The burden of the proof is on you.

    140,000 not 1,000,000.

    Furthermore, you neglect to attribute the quotation you’ve cited. The quotation in question was written by the president of IIchinhoe

    The point is that the largest political party supported the annexation, and King authorized the PM to sign.

    Korea was already independent before the treaty of Shimonoseki”……..Nothing that I’ve written is false. Korea was not a colony of China.

    Korea was not independent of China. And it was liberated. That is the point of Shimonoseki treaty.

    Article 1

    China recognises definitively the full and complete independence and autonomy of Korea, and, in consequence, the payment of tribute and the performance of ceremonies and formalities by Korea to China, in derogation of such independence and autonomy, shall wholly cease for the future.

    Whether it fits the definition of colonization, it was not independent, and the relation between China and Korea had been insulting and humiliating, hadn’t it?
    II don’t want Abe to
    kowtow to Chinese. And sending Korean comfort wives and other tributes are himiliating. In fact Korea made tributes most among Asian nations.
    Korea was obedient to China, that is why Koreans were called ” Eastern Land of Courtesy” by Chinese.

    After the treaty of Shiminoseki, Japan maintained a heavy military presence in the country in order to intimidate King Kojong, replaced the legislative body with Pro-Japanese reformers, and murdered the Korean Empress.

    Yon don’t need heavy military presence to intimidate King Kojong.He WAS timid. He run away to the Russian legation, leaving his people behind, he says good things to Japan when he met Japan, good things to its people in front of its people, he run away when the important treaties were made. Military presence was to keep China and Russia away.

    After the First Sino-Japanese War, Korea did not become independent because it was controlled by Japan.

    一進会 Ilchinhoe was voluntary association for the pro-Japanese. You can not control 140000 to 100000 people by bribe or force.
    As Bruce comings implied, it is not just a puppet political group as Korean nationalist historian want you to believe.
    Look at this photo, on the gate written “一進会 奉迎”,  Ilchinhoe welcomed Japan, Look at Korean people around the gate; they looks peaceful, they don’t object to its gate.

    The largest Korean political party supported the annexation.
    The King authorized it.
    And it was Korea that suggested annexation to Japan first.

    It was after the end of WWⅡ, Anti-Japanese president, under whose regime , a millions of massacre of Koreans took place, started anti-Japanese propaganda.

    Korean people have right to experience the “moment of truth”
    Don’t ban pro-Japanese sites.
    .

  5. comment number 5 by: pacifist

    Dear ponta,

    Lots of thanks, you wrote what I wanted to write to YoungRocco.

    I hope YoungRocco will know the truth in the end and will work hard to tell other Koreans about it.

  6. comment number 6 by: sqz

    韓国皇帝の署名が必要とする法律が見つかりません。
    I can not find the law that a signature of Emperor of Korea needs.
    けどこんなの見つけちゃいました。
    But I found “大韓国国制(西暦1899年8月22日制定)“.

    第9条 大韓国大皇帝におかれては、各有約国に使臣を派送駐紮させ、宣戦講和及び諸般の約条を締結する、公法に謂うところの自遣使臣である。

    I easily translate it, “The Emperor of Korea dispatches the ambassador to conclude a treaty”.

  7. comment number 7 by: Mika

    After the First Sino-Japanese War, Korea did not become independent because it was controlled by Japan.

    If the Japanese government had controlled Korea after the First Sino-Japanese War, why would they have allowed Koreans to
    build the Independence Gate in 1898? http://park6.wakwak.com/~photo/image/min06.jpg

    It doesn’t make sense.

  8. comment number 8 by: empraptor

    tomato,

    In response to an old comment above –

    About the Korean being split, don’t blame us…you should be blaming the Soviets and her puppet country turned cancer, N Korea.

    If you read carefully what I wrote and GarlicBreath’s comment I was replying to, you will notice that I’m not blaming anyone for Korea being split in two.

    GarlicBreath was implying that Korea, a state that did not exist for the duration of Japanese occupation, is somehow not only responsible for war crimes committed by ethnic Koreans during WWII but that the Korean state had the desire/intention/policy for these crimes and got away with it.

    It’s been pointed out numerous times (as does GarlicBreath in his comment) that ethnic Koreans were tried and executed for war crimes in instances of the “hey, they did it too” excuse. But it’s interesting what GarlicBreath says after mentioning this.

    Japan was caught and punished for her crimes, Japan had atoned and been forgiven. Korea walks freely like a grinning rapist

    So hang on tight and try to follow the logic there. Ethnic Koreans were punished for war crimes. So obviously there were Koreans who committed war crimes during WWII. Therefore, Korea is responsible war crimes. Since the Korean state was not punished for whatever war crimes ethnic Koreans committed during WWII, Korea got away with rape.

    But never mind the flaws in his logic. What I was pointing out was that unlike a “grinning rapist” freely walking away, Korea was dealt a fate that resembles Germany’s in that it was split into two states. As reference, following is part of what you quoted from me –

    I hardly think it was all smiles and cakes for Korea once WWII was over. After all, it was Korea, not Japan, that was split in two just as Germany was.

    And also in your comment, you wrote –

    Are you serious? You don’t know how much Japan paid Korea after the war and the extent of technology transfers that Japan has done?????? For example, POSCO was made by Japanese aid…now a major competitor.

    About apologies being made, it’s amazing you don’t know anything about it….

    The rest of my comment @GarlicBreath was asking how Japan was punished and what she was punished for. I did this because I found GarlicBreath’s admittance that Japan was responsible for some crimes committed during WWII out of place, as I generally read here about how Japan didn’t do anything wrong or how it’s not responsible for anything. So that part of my comment was framed partly to ask in what ways Japan was punished and also to confirm his opinion about Japan’s responsibilities on its actions during WWII.

    You are one of those guys who think it was simply a war for freedom and democracy punishinig the axis states, perhaps?

    No, I think Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. Then US went and invaded Japan. This is the first time I can recall anyone refer to American campaign against Imperial Japan as one to spread freedom and democracy. I think you’re attributing recent American propaganda regarding the Middle East to me for no good reason. Maybe there was similar propaganda back then, but I would think that counts for diddly squat as real motivation.

  9. comment number 9 by: empraptor

    Mika,

    You wrote –

    If the Japanese government had controlled Korea after the First Sino-Japanese War, why would they have allowed Koreans to
    build the Independence Gate in 1898? http://park6.wakwak.com/~photo/image/min06.jpg

    It doesn’t make sense.

    I don’t know how much influence Japan had over Korea in 1898, so I don’t have any opinion to impart on this issue.

    But you have said yourself previously that Korea was a tributary to China and that Japan wished to remove Chinese influence there. The fact that this Independence Gate was built is neither an evidence for nor an evidence against Japanese control of Korea, as I assume the structure commemorates Korean independence from China.

    Essentially, where your argument goes wrong is that building this arch named Independence Gate is evidence that Korea was independent or that Japan would prevent such construction merely because of the name if it had control over Korea.

  10. comment number 10 by: tomato

    So that part of my comment was framed partly to ask in what ways Japan was punished and also to confirm his opinion about Japan’s responsibilities on its actions during WWII.

    Well, Japanese leaders were convicted and sentenced for war crimes by the allies in the Tokyo Tribunal right after the war…quite a few were executed…7 in all. One of the persons convicted was an ethnic Korean who was the Japanese foreign minister at the end of the war and endeavored to end it (he was sentenced to imprisonment and died in prison). For war crimes that were commited in the front lines, far more were convicted and nearly 1,000 were executed (many more received imprisonment sentences). Like someone had pointed out, ethnic Koreans and Taiwanese were also convicted and sentenced (including execution) by the allies. You might know that Japan is blamed by the Koreans for this, but I must note that the tribunals were set up by the allies (US, China, Australia, UK, etc.) and they did not recognize the defense that they were forced to commit war crimes by their superiors.

    And of course, the country and her people suffered the fate that I explained to you ealrier. It’s a miracle that Japan even emerged as the number one economic power in Asia. I think Japan received a very tough punsihment.

    Also, you don’t seem to be aware of how many times Japan had apologized to China and Korea and other Asian Countries. Do you know the scale and depth of the economic and technological aid Japan provided to these countries, especially China and Korea after the war? It not unfair to say that China and Korea would never had their economic miracle without aid from Japan. This is one of the many ways that Japan paid for WWII (for Korea, it was for Japan’s annexation, not WWII).

    About Korea, its separation into two countries had nothing to do with punishment for cooperating with the Japanese during WWII. I don’t get what you’re trying to say here. Are you trying to blame Japan for the separation?

    BTW, I’m not taking the position that Korea got away with war crimes during WWII…there was no Korean state anyways, and ethnic Korean members of the Japanese Empire did pay. But I get concerned when Korea’s position during WWII is confused with China’s. The frontline was far,far from the Korean penninsula.

    No, I think Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. Then US went and invaded Japan. This is the first time I can recall anyone refer to American campaign against Imperial Japan as one to spread freedom and democracy.

    This is amazing, because you’re the first person I’ve heard that actually denies it. Where do you come from? I was trying to point out that WWII is much more sophisticated than some purport it to be, and like all wars, evil was all over. If you want to blame Japan for everything, it’s fine with me, because I rather not talk about it.

    BTW, about my comments being Korea being split, I’m not talking about the North/South split, I’m talking about the split within S Korea. There seems to be pro-NK people and pro-US people being split (of course, nobody seems to be pro-Japan). The present regime seems very pro-NK, and anti-US.

  11. comment number 11 by: tomato

    One little addition:

    War crimes were catrgorized in two. One for starting and leading the war, and the other one for classical war crimes (torture, massacre, etc….the type you see happen in the war front). The Tokyo Tribunal was for the first one, and the tribunals that were held all over Asia any Oceania were the the latter. It was the first time in human history that the first type was considered a “crime”.

  12. comment number 12 by: empraptor

    tomato,

    No, Korea being split into N and S was not a punishment for ethnic Koreans participating in WWII. If you would read what I have written, you might see that I’m not trying to blame Japan for this.

    What I was saying is that Korea being split into two states invalidates the already poor analogy relating Korea to a grinning rapist walking away freely after his crime. If he must compare Korea to a rapist, GarliBreath could have compared Korea to a rapist who runs into a armed robber who chops him in half.

  13. comment number 13 by: tomato

    What I was saying is that Korea being split into two states invalidates the already poor analogy relating Korea to a grinning rapist walking away freely after his crime

    Well, I don’t agree with such a view of Korea “walking away free” or a “grinning rapist”. So I don’t think we have any disagreement on that issue.

    I just think Koreans should not emphasize Japan as being the defeated evil in WWII too much, because they happened to be on the Japanese side during WWII no matter if they liked it or not, and I don’t think it’s desirable for the Koreans to have this aspect focused.

  14. comment number 14 by: GarlicBreath

    If the Steve Barber who received The Korea Society scholarship is the same Steve Barber who wrote this letter and who has been posting as Wedgie, and possibly other names, on this blog and others, then I fear that the goals of the society are not being achieved when it comes to the issue of “Dokdo.”

    Is this the steve you know Mr Bevers?

  15. comment number 15 by: toadface

    It’s not me Garlicbreath.

    BTW I never played for the Orioles either.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Barber

    I live in Korea and I run my website about the Dokdo-Takeshima dispute that’s all.

    Garlicbreath, a better question might be. Who are you? Y’know there are a lot of computer savy Korean friends here and abroad. Maybe they would like to meet you and say hello!! Then maybe you could tell Koreans how to better themselves in person. The internet is so impersonal don’t you think?

    Why don’t you tell us a little about yourself?

  16. comment number 16 by: GarlicBreath

    Maybe they would like to meet you and say hello!!

    Is that your way of making a not so subtle threat.
    .
    I seem to remember many times you made attacks on Mr Bevers, under differnt names, and once caught, still denied it.

  17. comment number 17 by: toadface

    Threats? I don’t understand. Personal attacks on Gerry Bevers? That’s nonsense Garlic

    But again you’ve avoided the issue. Why don’t you tell us a little about yourself Garlicbreath? You seem like a man very interested in helping Koreans better themselves. This is a very noble cause indeed.

    I think it would be a good idea for you to arrange a meeting with some local Koreans, Garlicbreath. This would be a very positive measure bridge the differences between the Korean community and their host country.

    Please don’t be so shy or modest and introduce yourself. Garlicbreath. Everyone looks forward to your correspondence!!