Occidentalism
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Visa required for Australians traveling to US

June 3rd, 2008 . by Matt

Have to register online. I guess that is not too painful.

Australians and other travellers who do not need visas to enter the United States will be required to register online with the US government at least three days before they visit, a security regulation set to begin next year.

Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff will announce the rule tomorrow, according to a government official who asked not to be identified because the announcement had not yet been made.

The rule was first reported by the Financial Times today.

Required online registration will begin in January and will be valid for a two-year period.

Those needing to register will be travellers from the 27 countries whose citizens are not required to obtain visas for US entry. The counties include those in most of western Europe as well as Andorra, Australia, Brunei, Japan, New Zealand and Singapore. Eight other countries – the Czech Republic, Hungary and South Korea among them – are expected to be admitted to the visa waiver program.

One has to wonder about how effective this is going to be though, since a million people just walk (illegally) over the border into the US every year.

HT to Errol


6 Responses to “Visa required for Australians traveling to US”

  1. comment number 1 by: Errol

    What will happen to the beef protests by the Sorkizens now that they’re equal partners with the Japanese and Australians in the US Visa Waiver programme?

  2. comment number 2 by: Gerbilbastard

    One has to wonder about how effective this is going to be though, since a million people just walk (illegally) over the border into the US every year.

    If by effective you mean a great way to record private information for god only knows what purpose, then I’m sure it will be pretty effective. If you mean stopping terrorism or preventing illegal immigration, then it has already failed.

    Yet one more piece of garbage legislation from the leaders of my country who feel it’s more important to wear flag lapel pins than actually fix the horrible domestic problems plaguing citizens.

  3. comment number 3 by: Errol

    An internet application system will at least slow down the Norkizens. They have neither electricity nor a server bigger than a Sorkizen cell phone.

  4. comment number 4 by: MarkA

    One has to wonder about how effective this is going to be though, since a million people just walk (illegally) over the border into the US every year.

    We like to assume that certain nations (Australia for example) have more respect for the rule of law than others, and therefore reward them with fewer restrictions.

    Other countries where people find it challenging to obey even the simplest of their own laws (Korea, for example) may find such a self-registration based on good faith and honesty rather daunting.

  5. comment number 5 by: Errol


    MarkA Says:
    June 3rd, 2008 at 5:35 pm

    countries where people find it challenging to obey even the simplest of their own laws (Korea, for example) may find such a self-registration based on good faith and honesty rather daunting.

    Good old Uncle Sam Seonbae and his non-discriminatory legislation.

    A la polémique de boeuf the Sorkizens take to the streets and squawk about not assuming the position of Number 1 Hubae?

  6. comment number 6 by: Gerry-Bevers

    The law sounds like a good one to me. If there is a terrorist or some other criminal trying to sneak into the the US, authorities will have, at least, three days to confirm their identities and prepare for them. That makes a lot of sense in this day and age. In fact, they might even be able to catch them before they get on the plane, which would be very nice. I know I would not want to be sharing a plane with a terrorist.