Occidentalism
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Was Justice Served?

July 3rd, 2007 . by Gerry-Bevers

The following is a link to a video showing a sheriff’s deputy shooting a man after telling him to get up. The deputy was charged with attempted involuntary manslaughter, but was acquitted in spite of the video. Was justice served?

Link to Video

The following is a link to a another video and an article reporting on the acquittal:

Link to Article

 


18 Responses to “Was Justice Served?”

  1. comment number 1 by: GarlicBreath

    I don’t think justice was served. I wonder what the jury was told that made them come to that conclusion, I also wonder why it wasn’t bigger news.

    Mr Bevers, I have a question for you, if you don’t mind. It seems that on occasion you or Mr Matt will blog about issues like this, which cast a negative light on the US or Australia. Do Americans or Australians ever accuse you of hating or having anti-US/Aust feelings?

    When I read this blog or other Korea focused blogs that sometimes discuss US issues, even ones that show the US in a negative light, most people are in agreement that the situation was wrong, or bad, or systemic of a bigger problem. But I never read people calling you anti-US or hating US or having been dumped by some US woman. However, anytime you discuss issues about Korea that is anything less then admiration, people, mostly Korean, make all sorts of accusations. I have felt the wrath of the Korean netizen many times so I know what I am talking about.

    Have you noticed this? What do you think about it. Do you find it odd, that Korean- “Americans” will raise hell anytime anything non-flattering about Korea is discussed, however, as “Americans” these same Koreans have nothing but ill will regarding their adopted “home”. Many are gleeful when the US is looked at in a negative light. Naturally I don’t mean all Koreans are the same, in that regard.

  2. comment number 2 by: Matt

    Good lord. That was a policeman? It looked more like a gangland execution.

    Mr Bevers, I have a question for you, if you don’t mind. It seems that on occasion you or Mr Matt will blog about issues like this, which cast a negative light on the US or Australia. Do Americans or Australians ever accuse you of hating or having anti-US/Aust feelings?

    Garlic Breath, no, no one accuses me of anti-US or anti-Aust feelings, or racism, or anything else. I see what you are getting at – which is that Koreans are particularly sensitive and tend to see things as “us or them”, or perceive specific criticisms or commentary on specific issues as categorical racial attacks. There definitely seems to be a siege mentality, or circle the wagons mentality among many (ok, probably most) Koreans.

  3. comment number 3 by: Fantasy

    Matt and Garlic Breath are fully on spot here – this attitude is so prevalent in Korea and among Koreans abroad that it could just as well be described as a national characteristic…

  4. comment number 4 by: GarlicBreath

    Thanks Mr Fantasy, I get a lot of heat for being the guy who is not afraid of telling the truth. Its my hope that I can give some honesty and balance to peoples perception of Koreans. I just find it odd that, for example, Korean Americans will fight to the death to shut you up, if you say something unflattering about Korea, yet many are at the head of the line to say bad things about the USA. And they are Korean- “Americans”. Mr Fantasy, do Korean-“Germans” hate Germany? I have no doubt that many hate USA and Japan, like their kin in Korea.

  5. comment number 5 by: Fantasy

    Garlic Breath:

    Do Korean-”Germans” hate Germany?

    Well, some of them of them certainly do, particularly those who, for whatever reason, didn’t really make it over here.

    What I find really funny is that the ISE (as the second Generation Korean immigrants term themselves here) generally seem to have quite limited knowledge of the country of their ancestors – on the basis of my own 5 years of experience in the ROK I quizzed a good number of them about how they perceive Korean society – and the answers I received rather seemed to refer to some kind of “Republic of Utopia” than to the actually existing “Republic of Korea”. Thus, in the view of many German Gyopos, Korea is the country of friendliness, mutual respect and unbroken harmony where each and every individual is willing to give up their ambitions for the sake of the greater good and where no real evil, let alone serious crime, could ever be imagined to exist. A most weird perception of the country that is…

    When I attempted to disabuse them of these twisted notions I made myself quite unpopular. Never mind – luckily I’m in no way dependant upon them and my (Korean) wife does not give a damn about the ISE. So, who cares ?

    On the other hand it must also be stated that many Korean immigrants, as well as their children, have actually been doing quite well in Germany – considerably better than most other immigrant groups. So, if, in the German political landscape, reference is made to the problems deriving from immigration, Gyopos are rarely ever mentioned. Whereas other immigrant groups, most notably those from Eastern Europe (including Russia and, in particular, my birth country of Romania), from the Middle East, and from the Central Asian Republics feature highly on the list of potential troublemakers…

    So the experience with Gyopo here adds up to a rather mixed bag – but all in all Gyopos can be said to be considerably better integrated here than in the US. I believe that the main reason for this is that German law and social mores, unlike those of the US, discourage immigrants and their descendants from too strongly identifying with their countries of origin.

    At the peril of going off topic here I want to give an example of this from my own experience:

    When I was seven years old boy and a student in a German primary school I was in my own personal childish “I want to be different” phase, so I tried to make a big deal of it that I am an adoptee from Romania (and additionally belong to a non-white national minority resident in this country).

    This, however, did not get me very far. I was called to the primary school’s headmaster who gave short shrift to any such behaviour. He told me in unequivocal terms

    1) that nobody was allowed to discriminate against me on account of my Romanian origins or non-white appearance – and that I should feel encouraged to report all incidences of any such thing happening

    but

    2) that I myself was in no way entitled to emphasise my “foreign” origins nor my non-white appearance, as this kind of self-exclusion of immigrants from the majority of the population was considered most unhealthy over here and deemed to be in extremely bad style. Under certain circumstances it could even lead to expulsion from the country.

    And, of course, the headmaster was right – I should not have tried to pass myself as Romanian, as I knew pretty little about the country, and my dark skin was of no relevance, either…

    It may be permissible for actual immigrants (those who came here as adults, not the 1.5 generation) to identify with their countries of origin, but for 1.5 or second generation immigrants, or for adoptees, this should be regarded as an absolute no-no. And those immigrants who mention their “non-white race” over here in Germany in the attempt to derive some unfair advantage from it (as is the case as in the US with its affirmative action programmes) will be silenced more quickly than they can finish pronouncing the word…Do Korean-”Germans” hate Germany?

    Garlic Breath:

    Well, some of them of them certainly do, particularly those who, for whatever reason, didn’t really make it over here.

    What I find really funny is that the ISE (as the second Generation Korean immigrants term themselves here) generally seem to have quite limited knowledge of the country of their ancestors – on the basis of my own 5 years of experience in the ROK I quizzed a good number of them about how they perceive Korean society – and the answers I received rather seemed to refer to some kind of “Republic of Utopia” than to the actually existing “Republic of Korea”. Thus, in the view of many German Gyopos, Korea is the country of friendliness, mutual respect and unbroken harmony where each and every individual is willing to give up their ambitions for the sake of the greater good and where no real evil, let alone serious crime, could ever be imagined to exist. A most weird perception of the country that is…

    When I attempted to disabuse them of these twisted notions I made myself quite unpopular. Never mind – luckily I’m in no way dependant upon them and my (Korean) wife does not give a damn about the ISE. So, who cares ?

    On the other hand it must also be stated that many Korean immigrants, as well as their children, have actually been doing quite well in Germany – considerably better than most other immigrant groups. So, if, in the German political landscape, reference is made to the problems deriving from immigration, Gyopos are rarely ever mentioned. Whereas other immigrant groups, most notably those from Eastern Europe (including Russia and, in particular, my birth country of Romania), from the Middle East, and from the Central Asian Republics feature highly on the list of potential troublemakers…

    So the experience with Gyopo here adds up to a rather mixed bag – but all in all Gyopos can be said to be considerably better integrated here than in the US. I believe that the main reason for this is that German law and social mores, unlike those of the US, discourage immigrants and their descendants from too strongly identifying with their countries of origin.

    At the peril of going off topic here I want to give an example of this from my own experience:

    When I was seven years old boy and a student in a German primary school I was in my own personal childish “I want to be different” phase, so I tried to make a big deal of it that I am an adoptee from Romania (and additionally belong to a non-white national minority resident in this country).

    This, however, did not get me very far. I was called to the primary school’s headmaster who gave short shrift to any such behaviour. He told me in unequivocal terms

    1) that nobody was allowed to discriminate against me on account of my Romanian origins or non-white appearance – and that I should feel encouraged to report all incidences of any such thing happening

    but

    2) that I myself was in no way entitled to emphasise my “foreign” origins nor my non-white appearance, as this kind of self-exclusion of immigrants from the majority of the population was considered most unhealthy over here and deemed to be in extremely bad style. Under certain circumstances it could even lead to expulsion from the country.

    And, of course, the headmaster was right – I should not have tried to pass myself as Romanian, as I knew pretty little about the country, and my dark skin was of no relevance, either…

    It may be permissible for actual immigrants (those who came here as adults, not the 1.5 generation) to identify with their countries of origin, but for 1.5 or second generation immigrants, or for adoptees, this should be regarded as an absolute no-no. And those immigrants who mention their “non-white race” over here in Germany in the attempt to derive some unfair advantage from it (as is the case as in the US with its affirmative action programmes) will be silenced more quickly than they can finish pronouncing the word…Do Korean-”Germans” hate Germany?

    Garlic Breath:

    Well, some of them of them certainly do, particularly those who, for whatever reason, didn’t really make it over here.

    What I find really funny is that the ISE (as the second Generation Korean immigrants term themselves here) generally seem to have quite limited knowledge of the country of their ancestors – on the basis of my own 5 years of experience in the ROK I quizzed a good number of them about how they perceive Korean society – and the answers I received rather seemed to refer to some kind of “Republic of Utopia” than to the actually existing “Republic of Korea”. Thus, in the view of many German Gyopos, Korea is the country of friendliness, mutual respect and unbroken harmony where each and every individual is willing to give up their ambitions for the sake of the greater good and where no real evil, let alone serious crime, could ever be imagined to exist. A most weird perception of the country that is…

    When I attempted to disabuse them of these twisted notions I made myself quite unpopular. Never mind – luckily I’m in no way dependant upon them and my (Korean) wife does not give a damn about the ISE. So, who cares ?

    On the other hand it must also be stated that many Korean immigrants, as well as their children, have actually been doing quite well in Germany – considerably better than most other immigrant groups. So, if, in the German political landscape, reference is made to the problems deriving from immigration, Gyopos are rarely ever mentioned. Whereas other immigrant groups, most notably those from Eastern Europe (including Russia and, in particular, my birth country of Romania), from the Middle East, and from the Central Asian Republics feature highly on the list of potential troublemakers…

    So the experience with Gyopo here adds up to a rather mixed bag – but all in all Gyopos can be said to be considerably better integrated here than in the US. I believe that the main reason for this is that German law and social mores, unlike those of the US, discourage immigrants and their descendants from too strongly identifying with their countries of origin.

    At the risk of going off topic here I want to give an example of this from my own experience:

    When I was seven years old boy and a student in a German primary school I was in my own personal childish “I want to be different” phase, so I tried to make a big deal of it that I am an adoptee from Romania (and additionally belong to a non-white national minority resident in this country).

    This, however, did not get me very far. I was called to the primary school’s headmaster who gave short shrift to any such behaviour. He told me in unequivocal terms

    1) that nobody was allowed to discriminate against me on account of my Romanian origins or non-white appearance – and that I should feel encouraged to report all incidences of any such thing happening

    but

    2) that I myself was in no way entitled to emphasise my “foreign” origins nor my non-white appearance, as this kind of self-exclusion of immigrants from the majority of the population was considered most unhealthy over here and deemed to be in extremely bad style. Under certain circumstances it could even lead to expulsion from the country.

    And, of course, the headmaster was right – I should not have tried to pass myself as Romanian, as I knew pretty little about the country, and my dark skin was of no relevance, either…

    It may be permissible for actual immigrants (those who came here as adults, not the 1.5 generation) to identify with their countries of origin, but for 1.5 or second generation immigrants, or for adoptees, this should be regarded as an absolute no-no. And those immigrants who mention their “non-white race” over here in Germany in the attempt to derive some unfair advantage from it (as is the case as in the US with its affirmative action programmes) will be silenced more quickly than they can finish pronouncing the word…

  6. comment number 6 by: Fantasy

    Sorry Matt, I do not know why this formatting error happened – would you please be so kind as to delete the repetitive parts of my comment…

  7. comment number 7 by: GarlicBreath

    Fantasy- Thank you so much for the information. I really wish you would make a blog so people like me can read more about your experences. Thank you.

  8. comment number 8 by: kjeff

    The one that shall not be named,

    Have you noticed this? What do you think about it. Do you find it odd, that Korean- “Americans” will raise hell anytime anything non-flattering about Korea is discussed, however, as “Americans” these same Koreans have nothing but ill will regarding their adopted “home”. Many are gleeful when the US is looked at in a negative light. Naturally I don’t mean all Koreans are the same, in that regard.

    Have you noticed that the thread has nothing to do with Korea/Korean/Korean-American? Do you find it odd, that you managed to make it about Korea/Korean/Korean-American again? And then you wonder why we “deflect”? Hmmm…. Except the three line comments(2 from you and 1 from Matt), nothing here is about the content of the thread, and here I am, adding 10 more lines of nothingness to defend(is it?) nothingness.

  9. comment number 9 by: John.

    The thing that I find really odd is that GarlicBreath says he’s “the guy who is not afraid of telling the truth” and that it’s his “hope that I[he] can give some honesty and balance to peoples perception of Koreans”, when in the topic about the dog meat industry in Korea, GarlicBreath shows himself as a biased fool who just mindlessly bashes Koreans without addressing major arguments (probably because he has nothing to say against them). It’s really funny how the lad thinks that bashing Koreans and being clearly biased and irrational is “telling the truth” and giving “some honesty and balance to peoples perception of Koreans”, don’t you? 😉
    Wow, I just wrote a whole paragraph that adds nothing to this topic in order to argue against something that someone else wrote that also adds nothing to this topic.

  10. comment number 10 by: GarlicBreath

    Wow, I just wrote a whole paragraph that adds nothing to this topic

    Do you find it odd, that you managed to make it about Korea/Korean/Korean-American again?

    Yes TheJohn, your comments on this topic, like all your comments add nothing. But you will notice that our friend will not preach to you. He just does that with me. What a hypocrite.

    And then you wonder why we “deflect”

    We? At least you admit that you all read from the same playbook.

  11. comment number 11 by: John.

    First off, it’s you who adds comments about nonsense the most on this blog. Also, kjeff himself admitted that what he wrote was not on topic and was just written to show how what you wrote was equally not on topic. If you didn’t catch my last bit:
    “Wow, I just wrote a whole paragraph that adds nothing to this topic in order to argue against something that someone else wrote that also adds nothing to this topic.”
    I also admitted that I wrote something that wasn’t on the topic for the same reasons as kjeff, and I think my point made some sense. If I already explained myself, then of course he would not have to “preach” to me. I think that kjeff thought that what you wrote both added nothing to the topic and also didn’t make sense, which is why he “preached” to you, so no, that doesn’t make him a hypocrite after all, I’m afraid.
    “At least you admit that you all read from the same playbook.”
    The same way as you read from the same anti-Korean playbook?

  12. comment number 12 by: GarlicBreath

    THEJOHN, I see you are stalking my comments.

    The same way as you read from the same anti-Korean playbook?

    Same as who? THEJOHN, I cannot understand anything you write. How old are you? 15? Go back to watching pokemon cartoons. This blog is for adults. Any quit stalking my comments by just repeting the same false accusations.

  13. comment number 13 by: GarlicBreath

    It looks like justice wont be served here either. Letting a child get boiled alive while running errands. … Coreans.

  14. comment number 14 by: kjeff

    GarlicBreath,
    Asked…

    Mr Bevers, I have a question for you, if you don’t mind. It seems that on occasion you or Mr Matt will blog about issues like this, which cast a negative light on the US or Australia. Do Americans or Australians ever accuse you of hating or having anti-US/Aust feelings?

    and answered…

    It looks like justice wont be served here either. Letting a child get boiled alive while running errands. … Coreans.

  15. comment number 15 by: GarlicBreath

    Yes, I wrote that. I also wrote this.

    Its my hope that I can give some honesty and balance to peoples perception of Koreans. I just find it odd that, for example, Korean Americans will fight to the death to shut you up, if you say something unflattering about Korea, yet many are at the head of the line to say bad things about the USA

    I still wonder why Corean “Americans” hate the usa so much and the same with Corean “Japanese”. It seems that Coreans will do anything to immigrate to the USA or Japan and then they (Not all) become a type of 5th columnists.

  16. comment number 16 by: kjeff

    GarlicBreath,
    Think of this as a friendly advice; forget that I’m half-Korean for two minutes, or three. I know this is just a blog. It’s not academic, you don’t provide proof or evidence, but I think at least, to be taken seriously, you need to refrain from impossible-to-defend generalizations. Think of this statement of yours:

    …Corean “Americans” hate the usa so much…

    First, let’s look at middle chunk of it first… What does it mean to “hate the USA.” If I am an outspoken critic against the current U.S. government for example, does that mean I hate the U.S.A.? If I hate a certain longstanding policy of the U.S. government(pro-Israel as an example), does that mean that I hate the U.S.A.? If I hate certain prevalent lifestyle choices, let’s say, sexual freedom, does that mean I hate the U.S.A.? Or, if hate the growing religious conservatism, would that make me a U.S.A. hater? Whatever do you mean? U.S.A. is too big, too large, too diverse that you can really say with confidence that one really hates her, except for those who want to blow things up.
    Second, the latter chunk, “so much.” May I ask what is “so much?” Is it more than an average ‘American-American’ that you mean? And how do you measure that, how do you measure ones’ hatred?
    Last, the beginning chunk, “Corean “Americans”.” I wonder where you encounter this so called Korean-Americans. Given your obvious dislike to anything Koreans, it’s hard to imagine that you actually live amongst, or in close proximity to a Korean community if you’re living in the U.S.? If you live elsewhere, and this is probably more likely scenario, how do you know? What you know as Korean-Americans are limited to those you encounter online, or worse, what you heard/read from a second person online. How do you know they are Korean-Americans? Do you recognize them from their Konglish? For that matter, how do you know who is who online? You, who had the occasion to know my name, but refuse to give me the same privilege, may be a Korean, or a Korean-American… How do I know?
    .
    It’s fun to mock you on occasions, well, actually a lot and a lot of fun, especially your repertoire with HanComplex, “Spot on…,” is priceless(Please don’t change it after this). But, I’m feeling older today, and well…maybe feeling a little sorry for you. The Koreans have a term, MiUnJong(Hatred affinity?; I can’t think of a good translation), I wonder if that’s what I’m feeling.

  17. comment number 17 by: GarlicBreath

    Corean “Americans” hate the usa so much…

    does that mean that I hate the U.S.A.?

    I didn’t know you were a corean-“American”. Its shameful the way Coreans will lie on the internet and claim not to be Corean for the purpose of libal against the USA and Japan. You would not do that.. right..
    .
    kakakak.. don’t answer.
    .

  18. comment number 18 by: GarlicBreath

    kakakak.. don’t answer.

    Actually I changed my mind. I give you permission to answer.