Occidentalism
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What, you mean Japan DOESN’T SINK?!

October 2nd, 2006 . by Darin

“Japan Sinks” You call that thrilling?

At the end of the movie the kid stands up and says, “wait Dad. Let’s see just how much Japan sinks before we go.”

After saying this he stayed and watched all the way through the ending credits. And then the look of disappointment came over his face. “Are you serious? Half of Japan was still left!” The child wasn’t satisfied with so little. It seems that for the child, even in the world of film, all of Japan must sink, and all Japanese must die.

…cut…

Japan is the image of conquest, they are the enemy, they can never become a neighbor in union. If it was possible, we want to ‘take them out’ once and for all in great form with our own power, but we’ll have to rely on nature to do our bidding in the form of a great natural disaster. We could never be more thankful for anything else.

Of course those are just the best parts. The author goes on to talk about Yasukuni and of course Takeshima like anyone else on the propaganda department’s pay roll would.  Furthermore, if Japan were to sink, 54% of Korean netcitizens would not help in anyway.


25 Responses to “What, you mean Japan DOESN’T SINK?!”

  1. comment number 1 by: ponta

    At the end of the movie the kid stands up and says, “wait Dad. Let’s see just how much Japan sinks before we go.”

    After saying this he stayed and watched all the way through the ending credits. And then the look of disappointment came over his face. “Are you serious? Half of Japan was still left!” The child wasn’t satisfied with so little. It seems that for the child, even in the world of film, all of Japan must sink, and all Japanese must die.

    I don’t care if there are insane adults, but I think it is cruel to educate kids the hatred so that they may not consider it immoral at all for human beings , Koreans or Japanese or anybody, to be killed.
    And if Korean adults do not think the kids like this need to be reeducated, who can say South Korea is different from North Korea?

  2. comment number 2 by: James

    Damn it man, you just ruined the movie for me! I was waiting until it came out on DVD to rent it, but now that I know I won’t be able to watch all of Japan sink and Japanese person die, what’s the point?

  3. comment number 3 by: Darin

    Have ya seen the Passion yet? Here’s a spoiler for ya, Jesus dies.

  4. comment number 4 by: nou

    why did you cut the important parts of the article? here goes the ‘cut’ part.

    참으로 끔찍하다. 그런 아이의 태도가 끔찍했고, 그런 아이의 태도에 동조하는 듯한 태도를 보여주는 어른들의 모습이 끔찍했다. 허구인지 뻔히 알면서도 ‘일본이 침몰한다’는 한마디에 그 통쾌함을 맛보러 어른 아이 할 것 없이 개봉 첫 주 47만 8,000명이나 우르르 달려가는 현실이 어찌 생각하면 끔찍하다.

    it was horrible. the attitude of the child was horrible and the adults who were in unison with the child were horrible. it is horrible to see 478,000 people go to see the movie to have pleasure of sinking of japan within a week although they know well that it’s a fiction.

    Matt said:

    Of course those are just the best parts. The author goes on to talk about Yasukuni and of course Takeshima like anyone else on the propaganda department’s pay roll would.

    it was a verbal irony. the author said…

    여전히 군국주의 망상을 못 버려 총리가 야스쿠니 신사를 참배하고, 과거 식민지에 대해 반성할 줄 몰라 역사왜곡이나 일삼고, 그것도 모자라 독도까지 자기네 땅이라고 우기는 일본. 그들은 극복대상이자, ‘적’이지 결코 함께 살아갈 우리의 ‘이웃’은 아닌가 보다. 할 수만 있다면, 기분 같아서는, 우리 힘으로 한번 멋지게 거꾸러뜨리고 싶은데. 그것을 자연재앙이 대신해 준다니 얼마나 고마운 일인가.

    Japan, whose prime minister still visits Yasukuni without overcoming militarism. Japan, who distorts history. Japan, who claims Dokdo on top of these.
    They are something to overcome and an enemy, not a neighbor. We wish to topple them on our own. How grateful it is that a natural disaster does the job for us!

    the author said later…

    실제 이 일어나면 영화와 같은 상황이 재연될지는 아무도 모른다. 그러나 적어도 그것이 영화를 보는 것처럼 우리에게는 너무나 통쾌한 일만은 아닌 게 분명하다.

    the author is wrapping up his article by saying

    이는 정치적, 감정적 문제가 아니라 윤리적, 이성적 문제
    this is not a political or emotional matter but an ethical and rational matter.

    No one knows the same things as the movie would happen, if there were a real . However, it is evident that it’s not a refreshing event for us like watching a movie.

    people who did not read the whole article would think the author was engaging in ‘let’s hate japan’ propaganda because you picked only those parts which would make people misunderstand.

    did your korea hate blind you again? or it was just misinterpretation of the text? i hope it was the latter.

  5. comment number 5 by: nou

    i correct the messed up b-quote above.

    the author said later…

    실제 이 일어나면 영화와 같은 상황이 재연될지는 아무도 모른다. 그러나 적어도 그것이 영화를 보는 것처럼 우리에게는 너무나 통쾌한 일만은 아닌 게 분명하다.

    No one knows the event described in the movie would ever happen. However, it is evident that it would not be a refreshing event for us like watching a movie.

    the author is wrapping up his article by saying

    이는 정치적, 감정적 문제가 아니라 윤리적, 이성적 문제
    this is not a political and emotional matter but an ethical and rational matter.

    (i also corrected ‘or’ to ‘and’)

  6. comment number 6 by: Matt

    Matt said:

    nou, who are you addressing this to?

    did your korea hate blind you again? or it was just misinterpretation of the text? i hope it was the latter.

    The jury is still out on that particular photo. I do not really see that the person holding the US flag moved to the center at all, when comparing to the Sankei Shinbun photo.

  7. comment number 7 by: tomato

    this is not a political or emotional matter but an ethical and rational matter.

    Yeah, right…ethical and rational.

    Koreans are just paranoid. They really think Japan is a militant power trying to take Korea all the time. And some (if not, most) of them are always dreaming their country might have been more developed and “greater” than Japan if not for the annexation…but it never was and never will be, so they curse Japan…how constructive of them!

    Who hates who? This question is so obvious….like I said, Korea is for Japan like Iran and Cuba is for the US. Their death call is getting annoying.

  8. comment number 8 by: nou

    my apology, sir! i didn’t recognize it was written by someone else. i thought everything else apart from Dokdo article was written by you. i will look the name more carefully.

    The jury is still out on that particular photo. I do not really see that the person holding the US flag moved to the center at all, when comparing to the Sankei Shinbun photo.

    the video showed a scene like below. (i’m too lazy too capture the scene.)

    M.A.
    US F F F F F F F Ko. UN F F F F F F F F F F

    (US=US flag, F=other flags, Ko.=Korean flag, UN=UN flag, M.A.=MacArthur statue)

    no photographer in this world can’t take the statue and the US flag in a close shot. the US flag holder had to move to the center to be included in that close shot you showed us.

    i think the silence of your allies in this forum also tells the video was a countproof to your speculation. if i had committed a tiny mistake, your allies must have jumped on me like wolves on sheep.

    i also wonder why you didn’t include that video as your UPDATE 3. wasn’t it because the video didn’t support your speculation? a video showing the whole situation must have been registered there i guess.

  9. comment number 9 by: nou

    oops i redo my drawing.

    ————- M.A.—————
    US F F F F F F F Ko. UN F F F F F F F F F F

    (US=US flag, F=other flags, Ko.=Korean flag, UN=UN flag, M.A.=MacArthur statue, —=just air)

  10. comment number 10 by: nou

    my text picture doesn’t seem to work. anyway MacArthur statue was right behind the center stage where korean and un flags stood on.


    greetings, tomato.
    i don’t know whether you celebrate thanksgiving day in japan. i started my holidays and that’s why i’m writing in a bulk. i hope you can calm down little bit with a cup of sakke and have a merrier thought than something like korea. too much occidentalisming will make you depressed.
    (my greetings also go to ponta and matt, too!)

  11. comment number 11 by: YoungRocco

    Nou:

    Wonderful job on pointing out young Matthew’s preferential editing. I do hope that he won’t be so sloppy when he presents articles in the future.

    I’ve tried to instill in Matthew the value of due dilligence and unbiased fact finding. Unfortunately, he seems wedded to his bad habits.

    I won’t quit on him though.I will work with him until he gets things right.

    Nou:

    if i had committed a tiny mistake, your allies must have jumped on me like wolves on sheep.

    Yeah, these guys are really good at teamwork. They hunt in packs!

  12. comment number 12 by: nou

    greetings to you, too. YoungRocco.
    you seem to be addicted to Occi just like tomato. i also cautiously advise you too much occidentalisming can have undesirable side effects. (we may need to organize occidentalismers anonymous.)
    happy chusok to you!

  13. comment number 13 by: tomato

    i don’t know whether you celebrate thanksgiving day in japan. i started my holidays and that’s why i’m writing in a bulk. i hope you can calm down little bit with a cup of sakke and have a merrier thought than something like korea. too much occidentalisming will make you depressed.
    (my greetings also go to ponta and matt, too!)

    Kinda early for thanksgiving, isn’t it? More like Halloween.

    Don’t worry, I’m swell….

  14. comment number 14 by: nou

    koreans celebrate thanksgiving on Aug 15 by Chinese calendar. the day can even come to September of gregorian calendar.

    this year you can have seven day holidays if you can make a good bridge between public holidays. the thanksgiving came in just right time. i actually wanted to visit Kyoto profiting the holidays and ever falling yen but i have a big test next month. poor me.

  15. comment number 15 by: Darin

    nou and YoungRocco, I’ll respond to your comments later (my head is pounding right now, so much that it caused me to wake up), but for now at least have the courtesy to realize that Matt did not write this article, but that I did.

  16. comment number 16 by: wiesunja

    Korea is nothing but a 3rd world country. Read the article below in Wikipedia about Korean nationalism and its stark difference to nationalism found in most first world developed nations. First world nationalism can be healthy and done with modesty. Korean rationalism reeks of that which characterizes the Korean mentality to at T: inferiority complex, jealousy, self-hatred, feelings of insecurity, lack of confidence and love for oneself, blaming one’s own faults on others, immature 5 year old anger and rage.

    The best quotes are the following:

    Nationalism in Korea may be seen as third world nationalism. Third world nationalisms are fundamentally at odds with the first world nationalisms seen in nations such as the United States, Britain, Germany, and other former colonial powers. First world nationalism, by its definition, assumes privilege and entitlement, and often is imperialist. Third world nationalisms, by contrast, occur in those nations that have been colonized and exploited. The nationalisms of these nations were forged in a furnace that required resistance to (neo)colonial domination in order to survive. Korea is among these nations.

    and the this:

    This phenomenon when it fully and visibly manifests itself as it did in the 2002 World Cup is a sight like none other. What probably makes it possible is:

    * the mono-racial composition of the people
    * one common language
    * social structure based on literally calling (and hence thinking of) each other as “brother, sister, mother, father, uncle, aunt”
    * a wireless connected population over the relatively small geographic area that is the Korean peninsula.
    * Seoul as the single most important hub for culture, technology, fashion, and education

    This all means that they are quicker to agree on things, more likely to think of things the same way, more likely to not harm each other and even to take care of and be considerate of each other, and more likely to gather and rally to a cause if there is reason to do so, as any location in the country is mere hours away by expressbus. The fact that Seoul is a central location of culture and fashion that can radiate and transmit itself instantly across the entire country also helps. Also, virtually the entire population aspires to be educated at universities in Seoul, making even education more or less centralized.

    So true..damnit, so true.

  17. comment number 17 by: nou

    Korea is nothing but a 3rd world country.

    what a new finding! didn’t you know it yet?

    The best quotes are the following:
    …The nationalisms of these nations were forged in a furnace that required resistance to (neo)colonial domination in order to survive. Korea is among these nations.

    the main idea of your quote is that the nationalism in korea was born because of ‘some’ colonial power. it didn’t intend to stress out that korea is 3rd worldish. korea being a third world was already an assumed premise. you seemed to quote unintentionally another blaming japan article.

  18. comment number 18 by: ponta

    It was horrible. the attitude of the child was horrible and the adults who were in unison with the child were horrible. it is horrible to see 478,000 people go to see the movie to have pleasure of sinking of japan within a week although they know well that it’s a fiction.

    The author is right It IS horrible. I am glad to see one Korean person among 478,000 Koreans realized it.

    Japan, whose prime minister still visits Yasukuni without overcoming militarism. Japan, who distorts history. Japan, who claims Dokdo on top of these.
    They are something to overcome and an enemy, not a neighbor. We wish to topple them on our own. How grateful it is that a natural disaster does the job for us!

    The author is wrong here.
    He should rather write:
    “Korea, whose president still interferes with Japan’s domestic issue, ignoring North Korea’s militarism and falsely painting Japan as militarist, Korea who destroy history by banning pro-Japanese sites, by whitewashing history textbook, Korea , who claim Dokdo based on no evidences, deceiving its own people. They are something to overcome, but Japan is the ally of Japan. they are neighbor, we should be friendly. We wish we get over the ultranationalism. How grateful it is that no war in the peninsula is happening and it is not sinking . All we have in front of us is the bright future, it is unwise crying over what is in the past.”

    this is not a political and emotional matter but an ethical and rational matter.

    What does he mean here?

    koreans celebrate thanksgiving on Aug 15 by Chinese calendar.

    Hmmmmm Thanksgiving on August ? by Chinese calendar? interesting.

    your allies must have jumped on me like wolves on sheep.

    Do you mean you are sheep and us wolves?
    The Koreans like to say that their peninsula is like “a small shrimp surrounded by big whales.” but now you are sheep? It is interesting how how you want to imagine yourself.
    But I enjoy the discusion anyway.
    Have a good holiday!!

    From Japanese wolf ーーーーーgaoooooo!!!!—–that is Gozilla.hehe..

  19. comment number 19 by: Malaclypse

    That’s funny…

    Americans created disaster movies, where some unforseen disaster strikes America.

    Japan created movies like Godzilla where huge beasts ravage Japan.

    Now Korea creates a disaster movie where disaster strikes… Japan.

    It kind of reminds me of when you hold out two fingers, and look through them at somebody further away, then pinch your fingers together and say “haha! I’m squishing your head!”

  20. comment number 20 by: Two Cents

    Malaclypse,
    This is a Japanese movie. The posters are for its release in Korea.

  21. comment number 21 by: YoungRocco

    Darin:

    Get well soon. I hope the headache is not too serious.

  22. comment number 22 by: void

    It is a remake of “Tidal Wave” (1973, Japan), based on Sci-Fi written by Sakyo Komatsu. Personaly, I prefer the orignal film.

    BTW, do you know the movie “World Sinks, exept Japan” 🙂
    It is a parody of “Japan Sinks”. In the movie, all of the world sink, exept Japan. But…

  23. comment number 23 by: Darin

    nou:

    Sorry it’s taken me this long to respond to your comments; although the actual headache itself did go away, the many headaches that come with school remain 😉

    First, your question as to why did I leave the part out where the author criticized the child.

    I can see why you would want to include that, but I choose not to because my purpose of sharing this article was not to say that one journalist does get it, but that the current youth has come to think that the appropriate reaction to political difference between two countries is to wish for the extinction of those that disagree with you. Although this one journalist may get that this is not correct, it does no good because he has already grown to adulthood, has chosen his path as a journalist, and is not in politics. His chance is already gone, where as this child and his generation will have their chance soon, and just like the drawings from the subway where children wish for the death of all Japanese shows, this particular child and his expectations (as well as the perceived expectations of others going to see the movie) of this move show that his generation isn’t looking too promising for when it is their turn to rule the country. This is to the fault of this journalists generation as they are the ones that made the decisions to raise their children to believe killing those who disagree with you is appropriate. His voice is now too little, too late.

    Next, your concern about what I described as “The author goes on to talk about Yasukuni and of course Takeshima like anyone else on the propaganda department’s pay roll would” you described as “verbal irony”. The part in question, through your translation is:

    Japan, whose prime minister still visits Yasukuni without overcoming militarism. Japan, who distorts history. Japan, who claims Dokdo on top of these.
    They are something to overcome and an enemy, not a neighbor. We wish to topple them on our own. How grateful it is that a natural disaster does the job for us!

    Mine is:

    Japan is the image of conquest, they are the enemy, they can never become a neighbor in union. If it was possible, we want to ‘take them out’ once and for all in great form with our own power, but we’ll have to rely on nature to do our bidding in the form of a great natural disaster. We could never be more thankful for anything else.

    I don’t personally see what’s ironic about that unless you want to interpret the irony as being something like, ‘although the author is critical of the child (and any others that go in search of a feel-good-movie about the extinction of the Japanese race and disappearance of the land), he too himself would like to see something happen in reality if it all possible.’

    If you could please elaborate on that section on the terms of what is ironic about it, it would be much appreciated.

  24. comment number 24 by: ponta

    Third, and sadly, the most significant point that I have to make, deals with my own personal encounter with a “death-wish” toward Japan

    However, several of my students recently asked me about how much damage could be inflicted on Japan, if North Korea were to “nuke” it. Rather shocked, I responded, “Lots.” To that I heard, “Yeah, but how many people would die.” I then told them that the problem with a nuclear bomb is that people can die from it even 50 or 60 years later. I specifically pointed out that there are people dying in Hiroshima and Nagasaki today as a result of the bombing half a century ago. To this, one student responded, “Good

    Learning to Hate/oh my news

  25. comment number 25 by: Darin

    Yes, I know it’s weird to quote yourself… but…

    If you could please elaborate on that section on the terms of what is ironic about it, it would be much appreciated.

    I just got done with class and was thinking, “what could possibly be ironic about that article’, and I think I may have finally gotten it. You mean that the irony is that Koreans want to, essentially, kill all Japanese people on their own, but can’t so they have to hope for a natural disaster to do it correct? While I can see how that could be considered ironic, I think I would use a word like ‘pathetic’ instead.

    Is this the part you mean to be ironic, or is there something else that I’m missing yet?