Occidentalism
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Which side?

December 10th, 2005 . by Matt

robert kim
Robert Kim, an American citizen and traitor to the United States. He sold top secret information to the South Korean government. Koreans think he is hero.

The excellent marmot reports that Koreans are being asked which side they would fight for in their US citizenship interviews.

Some officials from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services have apparently been sent for retraining after asking Koreans applying for U.S. citizenship which side they’d take if Korea and the U.S. were to fight, reported the U.S. edition of the JoongAng Ilbo (and reprinted in Yonhap). Late last month, a Korean man in his 40s named Yun was asked during his citizenship interview which side he’d fight for if the United States and Korea ever went to war. He declined to give an answer, saying he had family in Korea. The interviewing officer then got tough, saying he had to answer or he would have no choice but to turn down Yun’s application for citizenship.

Head over to marmots to comment, as I will be commenting there as well under my pseudonym, shakuhachi.


21 Responses to “Which side?”

  1. comment number 1 by: Katz

    Don’t make up minds here, Matt, nobody thinks he’s a hero. I’m sure everyone who think so is despised.

  2. comment number 2 by: CON

    Korean Newspaper English version

    Robert Kim Released to Home Confinement After Eight Years
    http://english.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200406/200406020044.html

    Biography of Robert Kim Released
    http://english.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200407/200407230050.html

  3. comment number 3 by: Katz

    *correction: make up people’s minds.

  4. comment number 4 by: Bob Reemus

    Man alive, Matt, your blog is the #1 bastion of truth about Korean happenings. Amazing.

    This may be odd, but how about a retro-blog piece on the Korean “hero” who was a petty criminal who ended up killing a Japanese citizen, gets out of prison, is welcomed to Korea as a “national hero” ’round 1999, only to get into trouble at home for stabbing an elderly man in Pusan?

    Your take would be refreshing.

  5. comment number 5 by: Matt

    This may be odd, but how about a retro-blog piece on the Korean “hero” who was a petty criminal who ended up killing a Japanese citizen, gets out of prison, is welcomed to Korea as a “national hero” ’round 1999, only to get into trouble at home for stabbing an elderly man in Pusan?

    Wow, I never heard of that one. Can you point me in the right direction?

  6. comment number 6 by: takeshima

    What are you talking about Katz? The gyopo Robert rim recived a heros welcome and is treated similar to Dr Mengle.. oops.. I meant Dr Hwang. RobertGim was paraded around like a visiting head of state. In a way he is king of the gyopos the way he has their respect and admiration. You admire him dont you Katz?

    http://times.hankooki.com/lpage/nation/200511/kt2005110622341511950.htm

    Pics of a grinning gyopo robert gim. And teaful supporters.
    http://news.naver.com/hotissue/read.php?hotissue_id=823&hotissue_item_id=17826&office_id=047&article_id=0000072852&section_id=3

  7. comment number 7 by: ponta

    Matt
    Maybe Bob Reemus is talking about this guy.
    http://www.alpha-net.ne.jp/users2/knight9/kimuhiro.htm
    I am not sure though.

  8. comment number 8 by: eli

    First, that’s exactly the kind of question they SHOULD be asking during citizenship interviews. Second, we should be executing spies like Kim and Jonathan Pollard the moment they’re caught.

  9. comment number 9 by: Sonagi

    Robert Kim did indeed receive a hero’s welcome on his whirlwind trip to Korea. The media followed him everywhere from his teary reception at the airport to his brother’s birthday party to his courtesy calls upon religious leaders and a former president to his filial bows at his parents’ graves. I watched the nauseating coverage on YTN, including an interview in which Kim talked about how busy he was because everybody wanted to meet him. The guy has collected hundreds of thousands of dollars from entertainers and other sympathetic Koreans. I don’t know why the US doesn’t revoke the citizenship of this convicted spy.

  10. comment number 10 by: Bob Reemus

    I can’t read the Japanese link, but The guy (whose name escapes me) returne in 1999 and less than a year later was arrested for assaulting another old fart over something petty. Korea inda shut the fuck up about the guy after that, but it was sickening that they rallied behind a failed, ethnic-Korean, petty yazkuza torpedo whom his own boryokugan had booted out (pinkies intact, I believe).

    As the story goes (and in Korea it was hard to ever get the full story, with facts conveniently thrown out the window), he took people hostage and off’d some local ainiki, or a banker. It’s really hard to get the facts (in English, since I think the words “Korean journalism” are a ruse for “fabricating bullshit and outright lying.”).

    Anyone who can help me get some straight facts on this: I’d really appreciate it.

    In my opinion, the Korean media would make a child-raping, child-eating, child-killing heathen a “national hero” if his victims were Japanese and he shouted out the mantra, “Uri nara! Uri Nara! Dae Han Min Goog! Uri Nara! Dokdo! Uri Nara!”

    Matt, do you have any info on the Kim Sun-il family horseshit, where his step-mother who hated him and treated him like shit and forced his biological father NOT to give him any money for education (so he took the job in Iraq) and then put on a 4* display of hysteronics once the media cme down to Pusan, acting as if he was borne from her own, cobweb-riddled, rancid womb?

    Sorry for the vitriol, but I have a serious contempt (outright hatred) for the Korean propaganda/social circle jerk of hubris.

  11. comment number 11 by: Chris

    What a B-L-O-O-D-Y outrage!!!!!

    Robert Kim should be spending the rest of his life rotting in a prison cell at Fort Leavenworth for espionage. This is yet another glittering example why the “alliance” with South Korea NEEDS to be dissolved as soon as possible. This man basically got of scot free and is/was being idolized by the South Korean media AND members of the South Korean government. He should have been shot. Instead, the Department of Justice, the FBI, and/or the State Department decided to go easy on him in some perverted effort to please people like President Noh.

    Several months ago, there was an official, whose name I can’t remember (Momo, Ponta, Mika, can you help?) in the national intelligence agency of Japan who told a visiting group from South Korea that it was impossible to work with South Korea because the United States (and Japan) didn’t trust South Korea in regards to North Korea. The South Korean media and government went into a frenzy. Washington officially denied the Japanese official’s assertion. However, the statement is true no matter how much people in Washington want to deny it.

    Why, ask our South Korean “friends”. The answer is simple. Everytime we, the United States and Japan, share any sensitive information with the South Koreans about, say, North Korea, the information always gets leaked.

    It’s basically time to end this “alliance”. No more sharing of intelligence with South Korea. No more technological sharing. (This goes on all the time here in South Korea.) No more favorable trade terms for South Korea. No more KATUSAs. No more US taxpayer dollars for the ROK Army. No more favoritism for visas, etc, etc, etc. Nothing for poor, little South Korea.

    The sooner this happens, the better.

    Chris
    Yongsan Garrison, Seoul

  12. comment number 12 by: Matt

    No more technological sharing.

    Chris, I am pretty sure the technological sharing has almost ceased. In fact, I think its the biggest secret about the state of the alliance. I am going to do a post on it soon, but it is clear the US no longer trusts South Korea.

  13. comment number 13 by: Chris

    Matt,

    Technological sharing is alive and well here in South Korea. I have personally seen it. The South Koreans copied/reverse engineered/stole a computer system that American contractors have been trying to sell them for years. When I asked an American contractor about what I saw, he acknowledged that the South Koreans ripped off the system. He said that it “didn’t matter” because it lead to better sharing of information. I was shocked when the contractor said that. If it was up to me, I wouldn’t be so charitable.

    Oh, by the way, the South Koreans claim that their system is better than the system they ripped off. Why? Because theirs was “programmed” by Koreans. Funny, don’t you think?

    Another example is the K-1 tank. It’s basically the Abrams tank. There is even a plaque on the grounds of the War Museum that boldly claims that the K-1 is the world’s best tank. (It must be true, right?) The South Koreans even ripped off the M-16. It has to be the best, right?

    Chris
    Yongsan Garrison, Seoul

  14. comment number 14 by: ponta

    Bob Reemus
    I don’t know how much details you want to know, but here is an outline.
    The kim hiro incident
    Kim was born 1926 in simizu, Japan.
    He had criminal records like theft, fraud, robberybefore.
    He had a trouble with Japanese yakuza one day.
    He shot the two yakuza, one is shot dead, another got injured.
    He run away and on the way he got into hotel and hold 10 people hostage.
    He himself called the police, he demanded that the media came to him to an interview.
    In the interview he said that he had recieved remarks that descriminated Koreans from a detective Koizumi because he was an ethinic Korea he wanted the detective to apologize.
    There were a long negotiations, but Kim released the hostage.He was arrested.
    Kim appealed to the society at the local court that in Japan there are descriminations against Koreans, I want people to know that.
    He was sentenced imprisonment for life
    Some ethnic Korean intellectuals in Japan sympathised with him, and some even applauded him.
    In 1999, he was released on parole, on condition that he would go to Korea.
    Koreans welcomed him as a hero.
    Even the film based on his story was produced.
    (kim’s war)

    In 2000, he broke in an apartment at the Pusan city and threaten a man with bamboo spear of 1 meter long.The man got injured.Kim was arrested.
    The Pusan district court sentenced him to penal servitude 2 years 6 months.
    One ethnic Korean in Japan criticised other ethnic Koreans in Japan, saying he was just a criminal, victim mentaliry will get us nowwehre.

    Chris
    I think his name was yachi
    http://times.hankooki.com/lpage/nation/200505/
    kt2005052520085810510.htm

  15. comment number 15 by: ponta

    Chris.
    It seems the link above is not working,

    http://www.prisonplanet.com/articles/may2005/270505doesnttrust.htm
    http://times.hankooki.com/lpage/nation/200505/kt2005052520085810510.htm

    i agree wth you.
    It seems some Koreans want to go with China, as had been so for thousands years. i do not see why they should not.

  16. comment number 16 by: Chris

    Ponta,

    Thank you for the links. I couldn’t remember his name. What Mr. Yachi said took a lot of guts in my book. Instead, he got pilloried in the media for telling the truth. Sometimes that happens. As the article you found points out, the very same South Korean delegation also got a royal drubbing from a US defense official in Hawaii (a general, I think). Intestingly enough, the South Koreans didn’t ask for an apology from the Pentagon for that. It’s just another case of the South Koreans asking for yet another apology from Japan for something/anything, if you ask me.

    It should also be noted that the head of the KCIA, the Korean Central Intelligence Agency, is also a well-known North Korean sympathizer. The head of the Korean Broadcasting System (aka KBS) is another well-known North Korean sympathizer as well. No wonder Washington and Tokyo have such a hard time with trusting the South Koreans.

    The faster this corrupt sham of an alliance is over, the better.

    Chris
    Yongsan Garrison, Seoul

  17. comment number 17 by: Yooklid

    The punishment for treason should be death.

  18. comment number 18 by: Bob Reemus

    Ponta – Thank you. That was the person I was talking about.

    Matt, how about your thoughts via a post?

    Vive L’Occidentalism.

  19. comment number 19 by: Reader2

    Bob Reemus
    you are welcome.

  20. comment number 20 by: Ponta

    I’ve bought this book today.It is a interesting book. I wish the author had listed the sources (such as pages, the title of the books, publishers, etc)more clearly when he counterargued against Koreans’ claim.

  21. comment number 21 by: Ponta

    woops, By “this book” I mean” manual for repelling anti Japanese abusive language” (Sory,I put the comment in the wrong comments section.)